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THE RETURNED ARMY

 

County Louth Servicemen in the Great War 1914 -1918

 

 

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¦ Introduction ¦ Abernethy - Durnan ¦ Earl - Knox ¦ Ladley - Myles ¦ Neary - Wykes ¦

    

NEARY, JAMES

Born in Callystown townland, Clogherhead in c1881 (aged 20 in 1901 Census). Per local knowledge (Mary McDonnell, Newtowndarver) James fought at Suvla Bay during the Gallipoli campaign and was invalided out of the army suffering from frostbite to his feet. He is remembered as wearing special boots after the war and being on an army pension.

He died on the 4th September 1951 and was buried in Mayne graveyard, Clogherhead. His name is on a Neary headstone there (coincidentally not far from Stephen Hardy’s grave).(Source: Declan Quaile)

1901 Census: James Neary, age 20, lived at house 5 Callystown, Clogher, Co Louth. Occupation Farmers Son. Father, Patrick Neary, age 50,occupation Farmer. Mother, Bridget Neary, age 50. Two siblings. All born Co Louth.

1911 Census: James Neary, age 30, lived at house 5 Callystown, Clogher, Co Louth. Occupation Labourer. Father, Patrick Neary, age 74,occupation Farmer. Mother, Bridget Neary, age 71. One sibling. All born Co Louth. Note that both partents have aged excessively in the decade since the 1901 Census.

 

NELSON, THOMAS, Royal Engineers. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

NELSON, Corporal, WILLIAM J, Irish Guards. Son of Mr T Nelson, William Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

  

NEVILLE, C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

NEVILLE, Sapper, E V, 68 Division, Signal Corps, Royal Engineers. From New Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

NEVILLE, Lieutenant, ERNEST W, Royal Engineers (Telegraphist). (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

NEVILLE, Sergeant, W, Royal Army Service Corps. From New Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

NEVILLE, WILLIAM,  HMS Anemone. From 1 Brunswick Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

NEWETT, ANDREW, Royal Engineers. From Mell, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

NIXON,  PAT, from Milestown. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

NOLAN, GEORGE, 51362, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 11 November 1882, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, George Nolan, 20 Brookfield Terrace, Dundalk, Co Louth. Previous military service, 11th Hussars 1901-1906. Currently serving in 50th Gordon Highlanders, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Attested on 7 November, 1914, at Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

 

NORRIS, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Old Hill, Drogheda. Formerly of ‘B’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

NUGENT, EDWARD, 18 Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. Formerly of Peter Street, Drogheda. Tailor, and well known as an official of the old Trades Hall.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

NUGENT, Private, W, Connaught Rangers. From Drogheda. Reported  wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916)

 

NUGENT, WILLIAM, King’s Own Scottish Borderers. From Hardman’s Gardens.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

NULTY, Private, CHRISTOPHER, Irish Guards. From West Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

News has also reached his parents in West Street, that Pte Christy Nulty, Irish Guards, has also won the Military Medal for distinguished bravery in the field. Pte Nulty has seen considerable service, and has been taking part in the recent severe scraps and scrapes of the big pushes somewhere in France, and was by the side of his companion Pte M’Quillan, when the latter fell fighting in the front line trenches. We congratulate Pte Nulty on the distinction he so bravely won. (Drogheda Argus, 15 September 1917)

 

NULTY, Driver, PETER J, 112 Battery Royal Field Artillery. From Drogheda.

Dear Mr Editor – Can you kindly allow a small space in your popular and widely circulated journal? I send a few lines of poetry, and I hope my readers will pardon my first attempt. If they approve of it, I will find some time when I can, and send a bit every week. I have just written this bit after I had bid my horse good night. All the Drogheda men are doing fine, and have on many occasions given the Germans an exhibition of their prowess in the profession of arms, though many will not return again for some time. I hope my poetry meets with your approval, and thanking your past favours. I am dear editor, yours respectfully and obliged

Peter J Nulty, no 23627, Dr. 112th Battery, RFA, B.E. Force.

P.S. You, Mr Editor, may rest assured that if the Kaiser knew that little song, he would say –“Gott strafe Dr. Nulty, R F A”

            (Drogheda Independent, 4 September 1915)

           

            September 4th, 1915

Dear Mr Editor  - Will you kindly give a space to verses enclosed? I see by your issue 28th, that the Drogheda men are not forgetting to tell you of the great popularity your paper enjoys at the front. I myself hardly have it one second until someone else wants to read. Hoping I am not encroaching too much on your kindness, and thanking you for past favours. I am Dear Mr Editor,

Yours faithfully and obliged

P Nulty, Dr No 23657

112th Battery RFA,

British Expeditionary Force (All my own composition)

 

A Kind of de profundis for the German navy

A few lines from the front just to keep the Huns away

Composed and written by P Nulty, R.F.A.

 

The Fleet that once in Heligoland

The fire of kultur spread,

Now lies beside the Kiel Canal

As if von Trip were dead.

So sleeps the fleet of Kaiser Bill

Until this war is o’er,

Those ships he built to raid our towns

Can sail the sees no more

No more to Bill and Tirpy bright

The Kiel Canal will swell

The locks alone will smash some night

            (Drogheda Independent, 18 September 1915)

           

            From the Front, 4th May 1916

Sir – kindly give me a small space in your very popular and very widely circulated journal to say that the local men at the front regret very much the disturbance in Dublin, and are thankful that it did not spread to Drogheda. Every one is quite aware of its origin. Engineered by the Sinn Féiners, who are the Huns of Holy Ireland, they have been a considerable time on the Kaiser’s Pay Roll, and the Apostle of Kultur will not help to defend them at their trials which they don’t deserve at all. John Redmond’s work of years is now flung to the winds; truly a very fitting response to his for loyalty in the country. Hanging is the only means to adopt. Shooting at sight of every known member of the Sinn Fein society might be resorted to with success, a price being put on their heads. If they want to fight let them come out to face their friends the Huns. We will be very pleased to return to Ireland and look after its affairs in a manner becoming a country belonging to the British Empire. Thank God! We have a Navy and Ireland is not yet a Hun Colony and never will be. Jim Connolly, known as the Kaiser of Dublin, did not wear an imperial moustache like his All High Pay Master. The All Highness and Supreme Belly of Potsdam has tried to b create war in the Land of Saints and Scholars as he is not able to put a thorn in the Allies side. All the men from the town heartily agree with the measures taken to stop the rebellion and even that if it comes to shooting down of our own countrymen it would be carried out to the letter. Dublin will give you some idea of what Ypres is like when you see it. Sackville Street will speak but is only a midge compared with the destruction of sacred edifices in France and Belgium. I may close, but I say that there are societies in Ireland  who need to be kept under observation, as the last affair is a disgrace with a blot on the memory of those who have made the supreme sacrifice, as Irish soldiers have done  since this war began, and are every day and night sacrificing life and limb, and the pro-Germans of Ireland live comfortably. Let us hope that pro-Germanism will cease with the destruction of Sackville Street. I now close, dear Mr Editor, thanking you for past kindness and wishing your valuable paper further success

I am, etc

P Nulty, Dr No 23657

104th Bds, A.C. B E Force

France (Late of John Street)

(Drogheda Independent, 13 May 1916)

 

OLIVER, WILLIAM, 25312, 27 Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 23 March, 1890, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Presbyterian.  Occupation Carpenter. Next-of-kin, William Oliver, 6 Balcarres Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. Previous military service, 2 years Royal Scots Fusiliers. Currently serving in 78th Cameron Highlanders of Canada. Attested on 25 October, 1914, at Winnipeg, Canada.

 

O’BRIEN, ALBERT, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

O’BRIEN, Bombardier, F W, Australian Artillery. Wounded 12 September 1916.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

O’BRIEN, JAMES, Royal Field Artillery. From Windmill Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, JAMES, Royal Field Artillery.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, JAMES, 9th Lancers. From Drogheda.

            Drogheda Soldier Hero

            Reported Recommended for Victoria Cross

James O’Brien, a factory worker of Drogheda, County Louth, who joined the 9th Lancers shortly before the war, and was with the regiment at the battles of Mons and Charleroi and the capture of the guns – where the regiment was 600 strong at the Germans and only 200 returned – was wounded in the foot, arm and back and two of his brothers were killed. For carrying off the field and saving three wounded officers he was promoted corporal and it is reported has been recommended for the Victoria Cross – Monitor and New Era

(Drogheda Independent, 24 October 1914)

 

O’BRIEN, M, Royal Irish Rifles. Dublin (sic).

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, Driver, PETER, Royal Field Artillery. From Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, Private, PETER, Military Medal, Royal Field Artillery. From Stabannon, Ardee. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

Peter O’Brien (son of Mr Peter O’Brien, N T Stabannon) who is serving in the RFA, has been awarded the Military Medal ‘for conspicuous bravery in the field’. He has many friends in Dundalk (where he was engaged in business 10 years ago prior to the war) as well as in his native place, all of whom will be interested in hearing of the coveted honour which he secured. Two other sons of Mr O’Brien are with the colours, one with the M C C and the other with the RMLI (Royal Middlesex Light Infantry). (Dundalk Democrat, 2 June 1917)

 

O’BRIEN, Private, T, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, Private, T, Leinster Regiment. From Windmill Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, THOMAS, Irish Guards. Formerly of William Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BRIEN, Private, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From The Dale, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’BYRNE, Lieutenant, DERMOTT McMAHON, Royal Field Artillery.

Dermott M’Mahon O’Byrne, formerly of the reporting staff of the ‘Drogheda Independent’ and who volunteered for the front at the outbreak of the war, has been gazetted  to a commission in the Royal Field Artillery.

(Drogheda Independent, 3 April 1915)

 

O’BYRNE, Private, MATHEW L, 1 Bridging Train, Royal Engineers. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Surviving brother of Private Felix MacHugh O’Byrne,1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers,  killed in action 12 October 1916 and Gunner Edward Michael O’Byrne 76 Brigade Royal Field Artillery, killed in action 25 August 1918. (DH)

 

(Recruiting Meeting in Dundalk) – Mr Felix O’Byrne, N.T. said he had three sons already in Flanders. One had been at the battle of Mons and had been in the trenches since. He wanted the young men of the country to come forward and defend their native land. The country was in danger and the fight was against an unscrupulous and barbarous enemy. Some of the Sinn Féiners said: ‘This is not our quarrel; it is not our war and we won’t fight the English battle.’ Let them for a moment consider what would happen if the Germans came to Ireland and drove the British out. There would be another land war and no Irishman, Englishman, or Scotchman would be allowed to hold an acre of land. Some people said that they would defend Ireland in Ireland. The proper place to defend Ireland was on the battlefields of Flanders. If they came over to Ireland the people who called themselves Sinn Fein would run into a mouse hole.

‘What about ’98?’ asked one of the crowd.

‘At the time of ’98,’ answered the speaker, ‘people of my name were first in the field and last out (applause). A Byrne came to Moira Pass and the name has been in Killeavy ever since.’ (Dundalk Democrat, 6 November 1915)

            (See also ROSYLN, Corporal, R, Royal Field Artillery)

 

O’CALLAGHAN, FRANK, with the RLR (?). In France. From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1915)

 

O’CONOR, of Charleville, Co. Louth.

Mr O’Conor of Charleville, whose three sons are in the army, in driving a Red Cross ambulance at the front. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

           

A meeting of the Castlebellingham Recruiting Committee was held on Thursday, Dr O’Hagan J P, presiding. The work of the Committee was outlined by Lieutenant Thornhill, who stated that every district in Louth was at present organised. The formation of a local Volunteer Defence Corps was also considered, and the aims of that body was explained by Lieutenant Thornhill. A letter was read from Captain Edmund O’Connor (who has three sons serving in the army) stating that after 13 months active service he was more than ever convinced that to win the war every man must do his duty. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 October 1915)

 

(Recruiting Meeting) – Capt O’Connor, D L, Charleville, next addressed the meeting and said he had just returned from 11 months service in the trenches, and the cry from the men there was that more Irish should be sent out. A good many had gone but they wanted more. He had three sons himself, and they were all at the front. Fr McShane, of Castleblaney, had asked him to send out as many Dundalk and Castleblaney men as he could possibly get.

(Dundalk Democrat, 6 November 1915)

           

Captain O’Connor, D L, British Red Cross; mentioned in despatches for gallantry on the 7th October, on the Aisne.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

(‘O’Connors (3)’ are listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

O’CONNELL, JOHN, was the first tenant of 10 Legion Avenue, Dundalk, which was owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Trust.

 

O’CONNOR, Sub-Lieutenant, E H, Royal Navy, H M S Temerain. From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

O’CONNOR, Lieutenant, E J, 3 Battalion D C L I, from Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

O’CONNOR, FRANCIS P, Royal Army Medical Corps. Formerly of Westgate Street, Drogheda, later of New York.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’CONNOR, FREDERICK, Leicestershire Regiment. Formerly of Westgate Street, Drogheda, later of Empress Engineering Works, Loughborough..

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’CONNOR, HENRY J, Royal Army Medical Corps. Formerly of Westgate Street, Drogheda, later of New York.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’CONNOR, Lieutenant, R D, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Dunleer district. Prisoner of war. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

O’DOHERTY, Private, E, Irish Guards. From Dundalk

We had an interesting letter the other day from Private E O’Doherty of the Irish Guards which bears out what another Dundalk soldier told us last week – the pleasure it gives these Dundalk boys to see a face from the old town in the strange land where they are all (in the phrase of yesterday) ‘doing their bit.’ In all these letters we get from Dundalk boys at the front they talk of the Louth football teams and their doings. ‘We have the best officers in the army,’ he says, ‘and as for our clergy, they are the kindest of men. When we are out resting we have Mass and Holy Communion every morning.’ He is good enough to speak of the pleasure he finds in reading the ‘Democrat’ Another Dundalk soldier away in the Balkans picked up a bit of newspaper in a Bulgarian trench, and found it was the same newspaper. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 June 1917)

 

O’HAGAN, Second Lieutenant, CHARLES, Royal Flying Corps. From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1918)

A week or so ago we mentioned that Mr E Ward, solicitor, had joined the ‘fliers’. It appears he did not go alone as he has been joined by Mr Trevor Tempest (younger son of Mr Wm Tempest. J P) and Mr Charlie O’Hagan (son of the late Mr John O’Hagan, Belfast Bank). Mr Tempest’s eldest son, Harry, joined the Engineers about a year ago and has been for months in France.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 March 1917)

 

O’HAGAN, Lieutenant, JOHN, 5 Battalion, Leinster Regiment. From Belfast Bank, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’HARE, A. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’HARE, Private, ARTHUR, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From 19 Cuchulainn Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’HARE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

O’HARE, Private, J, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’HARE, JOHN, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’HARE, JOSEPH, Irish Guards. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Mrs O’Hare, Cuchulainn Terrace, Dundalk, has received an intimation from the War Office that her son, Joseph, was seriously wounded during the recent furious fighting in France. Joe O’Hare, who was well and favourably known by all classes in the Lower end, joined the Irish Guards after the outbreak of war. For some months past he has been with his battalion in France. His comrades will learn the tidings with regret. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 October 1915)

 

Private Joseph O’Hare, 6054, 2 Battalion Irish Guards. Born on 23 November 1891. Son of  Patrick and Margaret, of Castletown Road, Dundalk. Occupation before enlistment was clerk. Enlisted on 23 November 1914. Height 5ft. 9 in, complexion ‘Fresh’, eyes ‘Blue’ hair ‘Brown’. Served for one year and 339 days. With BEF in 1915. Discharged on 26 October 1916, cause given as “no longer physically fit for war service. Later added as Identification Marks ‘Amputation left leg’.

            Letter’

Bailize Hotel

[indecipherable] Road,

London SW7

14/6/20

Dear O’Hare

Your letter of 11th has just reached me. As you can see I am in London do cannot do anything [indecipherable] till I return home which will not be till end of the month. But meantime I am forwarding your letter to our secretary of Pensions Comtee in Dundalk as it seems to me you are entitled to a slight increase in your pension if your amputation is so high. You are misinformed as to there being a fund in Dundalk for helping disabled men. There is the Cliff fund which is to help men disabled through the war who do not receive any pension. This has been used once or twice to help men temporarily. As you have a pension I am afraid yours in not a direct case. If you told me what kind of business you thought of starting & what capital sum you applied for through Pensions Committee I might bring forward your case on my return home Have you applied to Messrs Carroll for a post as clerk again? I have just recently visited Loos where my own brother fell so for this reason of for no other I take an interest in you & shall enquire into your case.

Yrs sincerely

C A Bailey

(Source: Soldier’s small book in possession of DH)

 

O’LEARY, Lance Corporal, HENRY G, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From Ravensdale Park, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

O’NEILL, -, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’NEILL, ANDREW, from Dromin, ‘missing’. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

O’NEILL, BERNARD, 5 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dunleer district. ‘Now at the front’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916) (“From Dromin, Wounded” Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

O’NEILL, DANIEL, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mary Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’NEILL, Private, J. Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

O’NEILL, HUGH, from Dowdallshill, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat attack, 14 October 1918.

Three of the five men who were landed in Douglas on Tuesday – Patrick Moonan, Patrick McCourt and Hugh O’Neill – arrived home on Sunday last and were met at the station by many relatives and friend. All had quite recovered from the effects of the terrible occurrence …

Hugh O’Neill of Dowdallshill, the third of the men, was on his first trip as a fireman on the Dundalk. He jumped into the water half dressed when the explosion occurred, and was picked up as stated. He suffered a good deal from the cold, but appears to have quite recovered. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

O’NEILL, Private, NEAL, 8 Dragoon Guards. From Kilcurry. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

O’NEILL, PATRICK, from Old Abbey, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

O’REILLY, Major, C M, Indian Army. From Knockabbey, Co Louth. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

Sinking of P& O Cruise ship Persia 30 December 1915, in Mediterranean

Dundalk Soldiers escape.

The list of survivors from the lost P and O liner Persia includes the name of Major C M O’Reilly, of the Indian Army, who with Mrs O’Reilly, had booked a passage from London to Bombay. Major O’Reilly is the youngest son of the late Mr Myles W P O’Reilly, Knock Abbey, Dundalk, formerly captain in the 6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, and Assistant Commissioner of Intermediate Education, and brother of Mr William J O’Reilly, resident magistrate for the county of Cavan. He served in the Tirah expedition of 1897-98 and was on service in China in 1900. For some time he has been temporarily attached to the 3rd Battalion Cheshire Regiment, bur his own regiment is the 63rd Infantry I.A. Mrs O’Reilly of whom nothing has yet been heard, is a daughter of the Hon Bryan John Stapleton.

(Ulster Herald, 8 January 1916.)

 

ORMISTON, Sergeant, E J, 2 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

 (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

OWENS, Private, DICK, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Maxim gunner. Formerly of John Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ORPEN-PALMER, Captain, RA  5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). Later Lieutenant Colonel. As a captain and company commander (Orpen –Palmer) was shot in the eye and blinded for several hours on 20th October 1914 when the Germans bombarded Premarques (near Lille). Taken prisoner also was a Captain Whitton who was unable to walk. Abandoned by their captors they stayed with some Germans until nightfall when they stole away. The invalid Captain Whitton was carried by the blind Captain R A Orpen-Palmer and guided him until they reached the British line held by the Royal Fusiliers. Orpen-Palmer was a sone of the biblical scholar Abraham, of Killowen, Co Kerry and the brother of Captain G de M H Orpen-Palmer, known as Opee 1 and Opee 2 (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000 from Tom Johnstone, Orange Green and Khaki, the story of the Irish Regisments in the Great War (Dublin, 1992) In The History of the Prince of Wales Leinster Regiment, this incident is credited to Captain G de MH Orpen-Palmer. RA Orpen Palmer as Lieut-Colonel of the 2nd Leinster Regiment was later severely wounded at the Battle of the Somme in August 1916. He survived the war as was the last officer commanding of the 2nd Battalion when it was disbanded in 1922. DH)

 

PALMER, EDWARD ARMSTRONG, 442244, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 23 August 1889, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Bank Clerk. Next-of-kin, A Palmer, Rathfriland, Co Down, Ireland, (relationship not recorded). Current military service,  one year in 6 Canadian Engineering Field Company. Attested on  29 May, 1915 at Vernon,  British Columbia, Canada.

 

PALMER, Private, P, Leinster Regiment. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

           

PARKINSON, J, Royal Navy. From Lurgangreen, Dundalk.

 

PARR, WB, Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve. William Burleigh Parr son of Dr Thomas and Mrs Anna Emmeline Parr of William St, Drogheda, was born on 21 May 1894. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

PARR, William H, Dental Surgeon, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

PENDERS, JOHN, Royal Navy. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PENDERS, Private, P, Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PENTLAND, ALEXANDER, Major, M O Transport, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda. Age 62 years. Church of England. Occupation  Medical Practitioner. Home Address Ferrigal, Gosford, New South Wales. Next-of-kin, Mrs Annie Pentland, c/o Mrs H Kilby, Labrina, Hunters Hill, Sydney, New South Wales, wife. Enlisted 18 December 1915. Major Pentland’s  duties were on board hospital ships between the Mediterranean, England  and Australia in 1916 and 1917.  Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Major Pentland’s son, Alexander, who was born in Australia, was a distinguished pilot in World War 1, earning the Military Cross and Distinguished Flying Cross. Originally enlisting as a private in the 12th Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force,  he served  as a machine gunner in Gallipoli, before being struck down with enteric fever.  Removed to England, he wrote to his superiors looking for extended leave which he was spending with relatives in Blackhall, Drogheda, Co Louth. (The 1911 Census shows George Henry Pentland, Justice of the Peace, living at house 3, Blackhall, Termonfeckin, Co Louth with family and extended family). Alexander transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, where he became one of Australia’s foremost flying aces, shooting down 23 enemy aircraft, either solo or shared. .

Citation for Military Cross

T./2nd Lt. Alexander Augustus Norman Pentland, Gen. List and R.F.C.
   For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On a recent occasion he flew to an aerodrome fifteen miles behind the enemy lines, descended to within twenty feet of the ground, and fired into eight hostile machines. On his return journey he attacked a train with considerable effect from a low altitude. He has in addition brought down several enemy machines, and has always set a splendid example of fearlessness and devotion to duty in attacking enemy balloons and troops on the ground.

Supplement to the London Gazette, 9 January 1918 (30466/635)

Citation for Distinguished Flying Cross.

Lt. (T./Capt.) Alexander Augustus Norman Pentland, M.C.
 A gallant flight commander, who in the last three months has destroyed two enemy machines and driven down four out of control. Recently, whilst on special patrol, he, single-handed, attacked four enemy aeroplanes; having driven down one out of control, he engaged the leader, damaged his engine, and compelled him to glide to his lines. One of the remaining machines followed the leader, but he attacked the other and drove it down in a steep dive.

Supplement to the London Gazette, 3 August 1918 (30827/9202

PENTLAND, Lieutenant, G C, 10 Battery Machine Gun Corps (Motors). Now at the front. Lieutenant Pentland is the only son of Mr George H Pentland  JP, and Mrs Pentland, Black Hall, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PENTLAND, WILLIAM CHRISTIE,  Sergeant, 175, 5th Mobile Veterinary  Section, Australian Imperial Forces. Age 36 years and 4 months. Born Dundalk,  Ireland.  Occupation Shearer.  Next-of-kin, G Pentland, Colchester, England, brother, (address later shown as Fens Road, Perth, Scotland).  Enlisted 22 February 1915. To Egypt  June 1915, served in Heliopolis,  Ismailia and Alexandria.  Absent without leave 24 June 1915. Awarded 7 days confined to barracks. To France 30 June 1916. Awarded Meritorious Service Medal ,  18 June 1918. See 3rd Supplement  no 30750, London Gazette,  dated 17 June 1918, no citation.  Arrived Australia 29 October 1919. Discharged 31 January 1920. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

PENTONY, HENRY, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Green Lanes Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PENTONY, Sergeant, S, Royal Irish Rifles. From Green Lanes Drogheda. Stationed in Dublin. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

            The Editor has received the following letters: -

16 August 1915

Dear Sir – allow a space in your valuable paper for a few notes from the Dardanelles. I am a Drogheda man, wounded in hospital at Malta. Lots of boys here wish to be remembered in the old paper. Well I don’t expect the papers have published an account of the grand victory he had over the Turks on the 7th, 8th, 9th , and 10th . It was great. We advanced along the whole line for nearly eight miles, and captured any amount of prisoners and booty. The poor devils! Some of them had no boots on but they fight very clean. They shout “Allah! Allah!” whenever we charge them. I should think they would about. When our regiment charges, they know it is all up with them. In our trenches you can hear the German officers swearing and trying to chase them along, but they won’t face us. Sometimes, when all is quiet, we give a big cheer in our trenches; the Turks think we are going to charge them, so they start firing like the devil. We play all kinds of games on them. One Turk who gave himself up to us, said that Germany recalled all her officers, so that shows good signs of the downfall of poor old “Turkey Cock.” We are at present attacking Hill _ . I can’t say, but you might as well be looking down at the spire of the Parish Chapel (not Dawe’s Hill). I am machine-gun sergeant of my regiment, and we had 23 machine-guns on one spot, not much more than 100 yards wide, and we his play h-ll with the Turks. Just imagine 600 rounds coming out of every gun per minute! You couldn’t miss them, they came in bunches. I think this is all. I hope to be home by Xmas, with plenty of “Turkies”. Hoping you find a corner in your paper for this note.

Yours sincerely

Sergeant S Pentony

6th Royal Irish Rifles

St Elmo Military Hospital

Malta. (Drogheda Independent, 4 September  1915)

 

Stephen Pentony joined the army before the war. He married Christina McCullen from Drogheda in 1912. After the war he went on to run one of Drogheda’s first taxi firms and died in 1965, age 75. Source: Tim McCullen, grand-nephew).

 

PERKAM, Gunner, GEORGE J, Royal Field Artillery. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

PETERS, Sergeant Major, 5 Battalion Royal Irish Lancers. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

PHELAN, Private, JOHN, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Cousin of John, Kevin and Martin Phelan below.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PHELAN, Private, JOHN, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment.*

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PHELAN, Private, KEVIN, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment.*

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PHELAN, Private, MARTIN, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment.*

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

*(PHELANS are all brothers from Drogheda)

 

PIGGOTT, PATRICK, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Rope Walk, Drogheda. Came from India with the 2nd  Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers,  and is still in the trenches with the battalion.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PIGGOTT, PATRICK, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 

PLUNKET, Sergeant Major, - , 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PLUNKETT, LAURENCE, Royal Irish Rifles. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PLUNKETT, OTWAY RANDALL, 1000603, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address Rapid City,  Manitoba, Canada. Born 26 April 1892, Ardee, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation  Gentleman. Next-of-kin, Lord Louth, Travellers’ Club, London, England, father.  Previous military experience, trained in Cadet Training Corps, England.  Attested on 4 February, 1916 at Rapid City, Manitoba, Canada.  (Otway Randall Plunkett was 15th Baron Louth from  1941 until his death in 1950)

 

POPE, Colour-Sergeant, C, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PORTER, Second-Lieutenant, A G. Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

Sec Lt A G Porter of the Inniskillings reported wounded at he front, is a son of Mr G E Porter, 107 West Street, Drogheda. (Drogheda Independent, 3 June 1916)

 

PORTER, GEORGE, 21 (Service) Battalion Royal Fusiliers.  Brother of William D Porter (see below). Son of Mr George Porter, West Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PORTER, STELLA, Womens’ Royal Air Force

 

PORTER, WILLIAM D, 21 (Service) Battalion Royal Fusiliers. Son of Mr George Porter, West Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

POWDERLY, JOHN, Royal Naval Reserve. From Downey’s Cottages, Windmill Lane. Survivor of HMS Irresistible that was sunk in the Dardanelles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PRENDERGAST, JOHN, HMS Defiance. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

John Prendergast, HMS Defence,  from Castletown, was killed in action at the Battle of Jutland, 31 May 1916.

 

PRESTON, FERGUSON MYLES, 34657, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 12 February, 1880, Drogheda, Co Louth. . Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Conductor. Next-of-kin  Mrs F A Preston, 13 Clarinda Park North, Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire), Co Dublin. Previous military experience in the Royal Dublin Yeomanry.  Attested on 23 September 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, Canada.

PRESTON, Corporal, Serial No 34657, FERGUSON MYLES, Canadian Contingent.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Ferguson Myles Preston was born 12 February 1880 in Drogheda. Next of kin is given as Mrs F A Preston of Preston Bros Distillers, Drogheda, which address was subsequently crossed out and changed to 13 Clarinda Park N, Kingston (sic. Kingstown? aka Dun Laoghaire?). Trade is “Conductor”. Was a member of the Royal Dublin Yeomanry. Enlisted on 20 September 1914. Height 5ft 7inches, Complexion is dark, eyes blue and hair black. Religion seems to be indicated at Roman Catholic, although there is also a mark against the Church of England option. (Canadian Archives, RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 7966 – 10)

Ferguson Myles Preston was born on 12 February 1878. Son of Matthew Shaw and Frances Anna of New Quay, Drogheda. He was baptised by John Eccles on 15 May 1878 and appears to have been one of seven children born between 1877 and 1886. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

PRESTON, GUS, Canadian Contingent. Son of the late Mr M S Preston, of Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PROLE, Private, S R, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Demesne Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

PRESTON, Private, P, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

PURDY, H K. Came from the United States to join the army, and is a son of Mr James Purdy, V S, ex-Portal Inspector at Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

PURDY, JAMES RINGLANDCanadian Contingent. Returned from Canada, son of Mr Purdy V S, the former Veterinary Inspector  of Drogheda port, under the Department.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

James Ringland Purdy, date of birth 10 November 1890,  enlisted in the Canadian Army on 23 September 1914. Place of birth is stated as Dublin, Ireland. Next of kin is James Purdy, Veterinary Inspector, Gorams (?) Hotel, Dublin. Height 5 feet 9 inches, fair complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair. Member of the Church of England.

(Canadian Archives, RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 8025 - 27

 

QUAILE, PATRICK, North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

QUIGLEY, Sergeant, J, 4117, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment, from 80 Marsh Road , Drogheda.

Sergeant J Quigley, No 4117, 7th Leinster Regiment, 80 Marsh Road, Drogheda, has been awarded the following certificate for gallant conduct in the field. – “I have read with pleasure the reports of your Regimental Commander and Brigade Commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on June 26th, 1916, and have ordered your name and deed to be entered to be entered in the record of the Irish Division – W B Hickie, Major General commanding 16th Irish Division. (Drogheda Independent, 17 January 1917)

 

QUIGLEY, J J, worked in Post Office in Dundalk. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

QUIGLEY, Sergeant,  J, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

QUIGLEY, Rifleman, OWEN, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Distillery Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

QUIGLEY, Private, P, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 7 St. Alphonsus Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(possibly) We have had a letter from Mr Tom Johnston, who is at Salonika or somewhere thereabouts, and is well. He has met one Dundalk man named Quigley who is also “in the pink of condition” (Dundalk Democrat, 15 September 1916)

 

QUIGLEY, Private, PETER, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 4 Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

See Richard Quigley

 

QUIGLEY, RICHARD, 2 Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From 4 Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Richard had two brothers killed – Owen, in August/September 1916 and James  on 10 August 1917.

 

            In the war casualty lists there appears the name of Owen Quigley, 9th Dublin Fusiliers who died in hospital in Rouen of wounds received in battle. He was a son of the late Jas. Quigley of Seatown, and of a family that sent four of its members to fight for a cause that they believed a just one. The other members of this family of soldiers are Peter, who was in the Irish Fusiliers in India when the war broke out and came with his regiment to France, where he was wounded at Arras in August, 1915, by a bullet through the wrist and is now on the retired list: James also of the Irish Fusiliers and wounded in recent fighting: and Richard who enlisted in the Gordon Highlanders (which is full of Irish lads) and is now also in France. This is a record that ought to make the traducers of Ireland blush. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 September 1916)

 

QUILTON, JOSEPH, Royal Irish Rifles. From Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Joseph had two brothers killed – Bernard on 5 November 1914, and Patrick on 20 June 1916.

 

QUILTON, Private, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 December 1917)

 

QUINN, F, Royal Marines. From Bredin Street, Drogheda. Prisoner of war.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

QUINN, F, Royal Marines. From Bredin Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

QUINN, P, Royal Field Artillery. From Lisnawilly, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RADOUGH, WILLIAM. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RAFFERTY, Private, PATRICK, 6 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RAINSFORD, ARTHUR FITZPATRICK, 700848, 101 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address 325 Hargrave Street, Winnipeg, Canada. Born 29 April 1872, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin,  Ross Rainsford, Carrick-on-Shannon, Ireland.  Previous military service, four years three month including one year and three months in South Africa Constabulary.  Attested on 18 January 1916, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

 

RAMSEY, Private, R, Royal Field Artillery. From 23 Vincent Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RATH, J, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

RATH, Private, P, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Clogherhead. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

RATH, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Duleek Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REA, JAMES, Leinster Regiment. Born on 9 December 1878. Son of Henry and Anne of Scarlet St. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

REAY aka REA and RAY Private, BONUS, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Brother of George  and Henry Reay (see below). (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

REAY, aka REA and RAY Private, GEORGE, 1 Battalion, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

REAY aka REA and RAY HENRY, Royal Irish Rifles.  The three REAYS are sons of Mrs Anne Reay, Sunday Gate, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

REDDY. J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REDDY, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From West Gate Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REGAN, JOHN, 2204541, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, handwritten note ‘Forestry Depot CEF’. Present address 23 John Street, Dundalk, Co Louth. Born 9 March 1894, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Stoker. Next-of-kin,  John Regan, 23 John Street, Dundalk, Co Louth, father.  Attested on 15 November 1917, at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

 

REID, Sergeant-Major, J W,  Barrack Warden, Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

REID, Trumpeter, JOHN W, 122 Battalion, Royal Field Artillery. From Military Barracks, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

REID, Sergeant, W, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

REID, Sergeant, WALTER, 2 Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers. From Military Barracks, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

REILLY, -, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, Private, BARNEY, signaller in 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, GEORGE. Attested twice.

249834, 208 Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 350 Front Street East, Toronto. Born 4 June 1872, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Stoker. Next-of-kin Emily Elizabeth Reilly, 350 Front Street east, Toronto. Previous military service, private 3 years in 11th Devon Regiment.  Attested on 4 May 1916 at Toronto, Canada.

 

2433338, Stamped ‘No 1 Forestry Draft Company’, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 169 Arthur Street, Windsor, Ontario. Born 4 June 1872, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Stoker. Next-of-kin Emily Elizabeth Reilly, 169 Arthur Street, Windsor, Ontario.  Previous military service,  12 years Dublin Regiment 3 years South African War.  Attested on  11 May 1917 at Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

 

REILLY, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 20 May 1916)

 

REILLY, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, Private, JOE, Irish Guards, From Bredin Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

REILLY, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Francis Street, Drogheda. Formerly in ‘A’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, JOHN,  born Dundalk, Co Louth. Australian Imperial Force.  Age 30 years and 5 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation Sailmaker.  Next of kin, Mrs  N Reilly, 6 Green Street ?? London, wife. Previous military experience, Volunteer N. Z. (?) Native Rifles. Enlisted 24 July 1915. Application for discharge from John Reilly on the grounds that:  ‘I cannot get separation allowance for my wife and children who are living in London, and I could not afford  to keep them on my present wage’ Discharge approved 9 August 1915.

 

REILLY, M, worked in Post Office in Dundalk. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers

 

REILLY, Private, M. Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

REILLY, Private, P, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

REILLY, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. Baker from George’s Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, PETER, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, RICHARD, Connaught Rangers. From Freeschool Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, ROBERT, Irish Brigade (sic). From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, Private, T, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

REILLY, THOMAS, Irish Guards. From Mell, Drogheda. Formerly of ‘D’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REILLY, THOMAS, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

REYNOLDS, M, Royal Navy, HMS Colussus.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

REYNOLDS, STEPHEN, `15484, Army Service Corps, Australian Imperial Force,  age 32, born Dundalk Co Louth. Roman Catholic. Occupation  Driver. Next-of-kin,  Henry Reynolds, Dowdallshill, Dundalk, Co Louth, father.  Enlisted 29 September 1917.  Discharged 23 March 1918, as medically unfit for further service.

 

RICE, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

RICE, Sergeant, J A, Royal Irish Rifles. From 38 Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RICE, Private, M, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bridge Street, Dundalk. Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Intimation has been received by Mr Patrick Rice, Bridge Street, Dundalk, that his son, Pte. M Rice of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, has been wounded at the battle of Guinchy, and is at present in hospital in Manchester.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 September 1916)

 

RICE, Private, P, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Prisoner of war.

See BENNETT, Private, P

 

RICE, Gunner, P, Royal Field Artillery. From Rope Walk, Drogheda. Was called up at the outbreak of the war on the Reserve, was wounded at the battle of Ypres, is back in the firing line again. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

RICE, Driver, PATRICK,  Royal Field Artillery. From Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RICKARD,  EDWARD BERTRAM, 2203A and 2272D, 1st Machine Gun Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Age 19 years 8 months, born Co Louth. Roman Catholic.  Occupation Clerk.  Next-of-kin,  Mrs Elizabeth Rickard, 389 Cleveland Street,  Sydney, New South Wales, mother. Enlisted  11 January 1917.  Arrived in England 19 July 1917.  To France 10 April 1918. Gunshot wound left arm,  22 August 1918. To hospital in England 24 September 1918. Returned Australia , September 1919. Disembarked 10 November 1919. Discharged 8 January 1920. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal. Died 21 August 1938.

 

RIVERS, Sergeant, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 ROBERTSHAW, ERNEST HIRAM,2293665, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address  246 Colony Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Born 10 August 1888,  Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation  Accountant.  Next-of-kin  R H Robertshaw, 121 South Court Street, Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, brother.   Drafted on 24 November 1917 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

 

ROCK, Private, T, Leinster Regiment. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

RODEN, Captain, EARL of,  North Irish Horse. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RODEN, W, Military Cross. Worked in Post Office in Dundalk. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

RODDY, Lance-Sergeant, J, Irish Guards. From Dundalk Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

ROBERTS, W, Cavalry. From Long Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROBINS, JOHN, Royal Field Artillery. From Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROBINSON, Trooper, - , 8th Hussars. From Market Street, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

RODDY, Corporal, J, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From South Marsh, Dundalk.(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

J Roddy, of the South Merches, who is in the 1st Battalion of the Irish Guards, has written to his relatives from Cambridge hospital, where he is under treatment for wounded received in action. Some extracts from his letter will interest our readers: “It was in Belgium I got wounded. That country is in a frightful state. All the towns and villages I saw were burned down. You may thank God that the Germans can’t get to Ireland. They shoot the priests and smash the chapels and steal the gold and silver altar vessels. If you hear anyone standing up for them tell them that the Germans killed the nuns who were attending the wounded – shot them down in cold blood. Belgium and France are great Catholic countries – nothing but chapels and big shrines along the roads. You would be surprised at the loyalty of these people to their religion.” The write adds and enquiry as to poor Paddy Walsh, who, as our readers know, went down in the “Pathfinder”. (Dundalk Democrat, 7 November 1914)

 

RODDY, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Official intimation has been received that Pte J Roddy, Royal Irish Rifles, has been wounded and gassed. Pte Roddy, who has been close on 18 months fighting in France, was formerly employed in the G P O, Dundalk. His parents reside in Barrack Street. (Dundalk Democrat, 18 November 1916)

 

RODDY, MICHAEL, 6 Battalion Inniskilling Dragoons. From Williamson’s Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROE, Second Lieutenant, P J, 6 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Solicitor. Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

Mr Patrick J Roe, B.A., solicitor, son of the late Mr. Thomas Roe, proprietor and editor of the “Democrat” has received a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 6th Leinsters, and leaves for Cork next year to commence his training. Mr. Roe surrenders for the time being a fine and promising practice at the local Bar, built up by ability, character, and that close attention to detail which is the chief element in the making of a successful career. It is no small sacrifice that he makes, in relinquishing, even for a time, so fine a prospect. It is, however, a sacrifice that has been made by many high spirited and patriotic young Irishmen of his profession, who have followed the insistent call of conscience from a life of ease and comfort to one of unaccustomed hardship and danger. We know that, whatever lies before him Mr. Roe will acquit himself well; and that when he returns to civil life at the end of this war he will have done credit to his name and to his native town.

We think that the example given by Lieut. Roe will not be lost upon other young men of his class who are free to join the army, but who shew no sign of being alive to their responsibility in this crises. Every man, of course, is free to service or to refuse service; and many who would gladly lend a hand are deterred by duties that cannot be evaded. But there are others who prefer ease and personal safety to a higher call of sacrifice. They do not lack good example. Mr. John Redmond’s only son is with the Irish Brigade. Mr. John Fitzgibbon’s son, a class-fellow of Lieut. Roe, has given his life gloriously in the cause of liberty at the Dardanelles. These men, and the 250, 000 other Irishmen now serving with the colours, and under no foolish delusion as to what the duty of an Irishman is in this time of trial. Those others who are living useless and selfish lives – more especially those who boasted a superior (?) brand of what they called “loyalty” but whose activities are still confined to golf links and tennis lawns – ought to examine their conscience. (Dundalk Democrat, 25 September 1915)

           

Some of our young Dundalk men who joined the army in the past year are just gone to the front. They include Lieuts. Roe, Brown, Flynn and Hall who are all serving in the same Irish Battalion. Surgeon Lavery has also gone to France to join the medical corps there. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

Lieut. P J Roe was in Dundalk during the week on a few days leave from the front. Lieut Roe has been in the trenches for several months, with a trench mortar battery, in the region of the famous Hohenzollern redoubt and on the Somme. His many friends were delighted to see him in the pink of condition and in excellent spirits – as indeed are all the ‘boys’ one meets home from the front.

(Dundalk Democrat, 23 December 1916)

           

            Intimation was received during the week that Lieut. P J Roe, solicitor (son of the late Mr Thomas Roe, editor and proprietor of this paper), has been wounded. A subsequent cheery letter from Lieut Roe himself relieved his family and friends of apprehension. He ‘stopped a piece of shrapnel’ is his own cheerful way of putting the matter; and he wrote on his way to a home hospital. Lieut Roe has been nearly a year in France, with a trench mortar battery. His many friends will rejoice that matters are no worse with him. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 March 1917)

 

Lieut P J Roe, who though still in the hands of the doctors, has so far recovered from his wound as to be able to move about, visited Dundalk during the week and received a warm welcome from his many friends.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

 

Lieutenant P J Roe, who is home on leave, visited Dundalk during the week and was greeted by many friends at the Show on Thursday. Lieut Roe who was wounded on the Western front last year, served in Egypt and Palestine after his recovery and was subsequently sent back to the Western front, where he has been for some months. His many friends were delighted to see him looking remarkably fit and in the best of spirits. (Dundalk Democrat, 7 September 1918)

 

Lieut P J Roe, Leinster Regiment (attached Trench Mortar Battery) was slightly wounded in the fighting in France on October 9. This is the second time Lieut Roe has been wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 October 1918)

 

A lot of the boys and girls are drifting home from the battlefields. Captain P J Roe got home yesterday, and is restarting his legal practice at once.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 January 1919)

 

Mr Patrick J Roe who has retired from the army with the rank of Captain, after three years’ service, has resumed his legal practice in Dundalk and Ardee, having entered into partnership with Mr Frank Johnston. Captain Roe saw service not only in France, but in Egypt and Palestine, and was twice wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 February 1919)

 

ROE, RICHARD, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

Brother of William Roe, 2 Battalion Leinster regiment, who was killed in action 2 January 1915.

The brothers Roe are sons of Mr John Roe, Merchant sailor, now employed on Transport Duty conveying troops and provisions to France, and belonging to Rope Walk, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ROGERS, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

ROGERS, J, Royal Navy, HMS Birmingham. Worked in the L and Y Railway Co. Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ROGERS, Corporal, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

The ‘London Gazette’ this week contains the name (s) of … Cpl J Rogers, Dublins (Drogheda) as recipient(s )of the Military Medal.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 January 1918)

 

ROGERS, Private, JOHN, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Nun’s Walk, Drogheda.

Private John Rogers, Nun’s Walk, Drogheda, was charged by Acting Sergeant Flanagan before a Special Court on Tuesday with being a deserter from the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and was handed over to a military escort.

(Drogheda Independent, 1 May 1915)

 

ROGERS, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ROGAN, EDWARD, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROONEY, O. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROONEY, Captain, OWEN, Officer commanding Training Division of No 2 Artillery School. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROONEY, PATRICK, Irish Guards. National teacher from 4 Chapel Street, Dundalk. Discharged 1 December 1914. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

In the battalion of the Irish Guards now undergoing training there are over forty Dundalk lads. One of them, a son of J W Turner, has been raised to non-commissioned rank. Amongst the others who ought to climb the military ladder are Jack Goodman and Patrick Rooney. The latter was assistant teacher in Dromiskin when the war broke out. We notice a statement in yesterday’s papers that owing to the failure of the Educational Authorities to provide substitutes or pay for teachers volunteering, only one Irish National Teacher has joined the colours. Apparently this is Mr Rooney. His uncle holds a captains commission in the artillery, having risen to that rank by sheer merit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 November 1914)

 

ROSLYN, Corporal, R, Royal Field Artillery. From 34 Emer Terrace, Castletown Road, Dundalk

ROSLYN – February 16, 1918, at her residence 34 Emer Terrace, Castletown Road, Dundalk, Mina, beloved wife of Corporal R Roslyn, R F A, after a tedious illness, borne with Christian fortitude and fortified by the rites of the Holy Church R I P. Funeral to St Patrick’s Cemetery on Monday 18th February. Chief Mourners – Corporal Roslyn (husband), F O’Byrne (father),  John  J  and Gunner E O’Byrne R F A (brothers), John and Henry Cousins (relatives). Father Kerr, C C performed the funeral obsequies. (M’Gough, undertaker)

            (Dundalk Democrat, 23 February 1918)

 

(Gunner E O’Byrne, RFA was killed in action on 25 August 1918. See also O’BRYNE, Private, MATTHEW,  Royal Engineers))

 

ROSS, Dispatch Rider, J. From 16 Brook Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROSS, Artifice Engineer, J, Royal Navy, HMS Attention.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ROSS, ROBERT J, Royal Navy, HMS Attentive. Also HMS Prince of Wales

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

 ROURKE, MICHAEL. From Hardman’s Gardens, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

ROWE, Driver, Raymond, Royal Engineers. From McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROWE, T. From 16 Brook Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROWE, Driver, William, Royal Engineers. From McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ROYSE, Chaplain, Rev T, M A, son of Mrs Royse, St Peter’s Place, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

RUSHE, Private, - Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

 

RYAN, Corporal, ROBERT, 7245 1st  Army Troop Engineers, Australian Imperial Force, Born Dundalk, Co Louth. Age 26 years and 5 months. Church of England.  Occupation Bootmaker. Next-of-kin , Eveline Ryan, Station Street,  Victoria, Australia, sister. Enlisted  6 December 1915. Arrived in England 6 June 1917. To France 17 November 1917.  November 20, 1917, charged with being absent without leave from noon until 2.45p.m and with being improperly dressed. Forfeit three days pay.  Admitted to hospital 16 May 1918, Diarrhoea. Rejoined unit 23 June 1918. To England on Leave 6 December 1918. Admitted to hospital 21 December 1918  Rheumatism. Arrived back in Australia 8 May 1919, Discharged 21 July 1919, Medically unfit, disability Chronic Rheumatism. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

SANDYS, J. From 5 Brook Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SCULLY, Private, WILLIAM, 17 Battalion Munster Fusiliers. From Dublin Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SCOTT, Sergeant- Major,  HENRY, 1761, 8 Battery Field Artillery, Australian Imperial Force. Born Tullyallen, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Age 33. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin,  Mary Julia Scott,  PO Guildford, wife. Previous military experience, Royal Field Artillery 15 years,  Royal Australian Field Artillery, 16 months (as instructor). Enlisted 15 September 1914. Embarked for active service abroad  2 November 1914. In Mediterranean area April 1915. To hospital at Mudros, Greece, suffering from  ‘Corcivus and Teeth’. Arrived in England 10 October 1915 for further treatment.  Repatriated to Australia 20 April 1916. Discharged as Medically unfit, 19 August 1916, however there is a letter dated  6 July 1920 from the Commonwealth Military Forces, 5th Military District, Perth, Australia, which states that Sgt Major Scott was at that time ‘a member of the Permanent Instructional Staff, 3rd Military District . Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. Died 25 August 1955.

 

SEERY, Private, M, Lancashire Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

SEGRAVE, MATHEW, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SENDALL, FRANK, 28 Brigade Royal Field Artillery. Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)                  

 

SHANKEY, JOHN, 823, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 6 January 1878, Dundalk, Co Louth, Ireland.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Carpenter. Next-of-kin, Margaret Shankey,  1 Mountain View, Dundalk, Co Louth, mother.  Attested on 1 December 1914 at Montreal,  Quebec, Canada.

 

SHARKEY, OWEN, 2004609, Yukon Infantry Company, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Dawson, Yukon, Canada. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Born 2 December 1883, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Occupation Miner. Next-of-kin, Mrs Kate Sharkey, 1 Savilla Road, Old Swan, Liverpool, England., mother.  Attested on 5 October 1916 at Dawson, Yukon.

 

SHARKEY, PATRICK, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

SHAW, Captain, FREDERICK. Royal Engineers. From Drogheda.

Drogheda Officer’s Promotion – Joining the Royal Engineers in December last as Second Lieutenant, Mr Fred Shaw, Architect, Laurence Street, has now been appointed Captain, his promotion being gazetted some weeks ago with seniority from April 21st. His friends in Drogheda will congratulate him on his success and wish him further distinction. (Drogheda Advertiser, 2 September 1916)

 

The London Gazette of July 29th states that Mr F Shaw, M R I A, of Laurence Street, Drogheda, has been promoted captain with seniority from the 21st April, 1916. Mr Shaw joined the Royal Engineers on December 28th, 1915.

            (Drogheda Independent, 9 September 1916)                                                             (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

                                   

SHAW-HAMILTON, Captain, R C H, 4 Dragoons G(sic). From Ardronan, Dromiskin, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SHEILDS, MICHAEL, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Brother to Messrs Sheilds, West Gate and Freeschool Lane.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHERLOCK, GEORGE, Royal Irish Rifles, wounded. Son of T H Sherlock, Veterinary Surgeon. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

SHERLOCK, Captain, THOMAS, Army Veterinary Corps. Thomas Henry Sherlock was a veterinary surgeon in Drogheda married to Harriet, and lived at Wellington Quay.

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

SHEVLIN, J J. RAMC Carrickmacross and Dundalk.

Mr J J Shevlin R F  S, Carrickmacross and Dundalk, having received a commission as Dental Surgeon attached to the R A M C, will be out of town for some time. His practice in Dundalk and Carrickmacross will be attended to in his absence. (Dundalk Democrat. 7 September 1918)

 

SHEVLIN, J. from Donaghmore, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SHEILS, - , Royal Navy. From Dungooley, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SHEILS, DENIS, Royal Navy. From Dungooley, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SHEILS, FRANK, Royal Navy. From Dungooley, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SHEILS, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

SHEILS, Stoker, JOSEPH, Royal Navy. From Dungooley, Kilcurry, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SHIELS. JOSEPH

The Chairman said the next business was the election of director. The directors retired by rotation, and it was now his turn, but he was willing to be re-elected. However that was a matter for the shareholders. He regretted that one of their directors, Mr Joseph Shiels, was a prisoner of war in Germany. He hoped that he would soon return safely, and that the war would be over before their next meeting, and with successful results (Applause).

(Dundalk Democrat, 30 January 1915)

 

SHEILS, Private, PATRICK, Irish Guards. Late of Murphy’s, West Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHERIDAN, JOHN JOSEPH PATRICK. Born in Newhaggard, Drogheda. He was a railway engineer and volunteered in Feb 1917 with the Royal Engineers in the 25th Light Railway Workshop Company. He was invalided out of France in late 1918 with dysentery. He had been living in the UK before the war, and then he went back there. (Source: Alan Clare)

 

SHERIDAN, Private, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Wounded.

(Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

SHERLOCK, G, Royal Irish Rifles. Son of Mr T H Sherlock, Veterinary Surgeon.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHERLOCK, GEORGE, son of Mr Arthur Sherlock and nephew of Mr T H Sherlock, Veterinary Surgeon. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHERRY, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From North Road, Drogheda. Formerly of ‘A’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHIEL. Private, P, Irish Guards. From Ardee. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

SHIELDS, JAMES. Born in Duleek, Co Meath,  in 1875 and enlisted in the British Army in 1893. He served with the Royal Sussex Regt and then the 3rd Hussars. He was in India and in Boer War. He was discharged in 1912.

He volunteered in Sept 1914 and served with the Royal Fusiliers in France in 1915, 16 and in India in 16,17,18. He was discharged in 1918.(Source: Alan Clare)

 

SHOLDIS, Staff Sergeant, WILLIAM WEIR, 12767, Australian Army  Medical Corps, Australian Imperial Force, born Dundalk, age 26 years and nine months.  Occupation Salesman.  Church of England. Next-of-kin, Mrs Sarah Sholdis, St Mary’s Road, Dundalk, Co Louth, mother.  Previous military experience, Royal Army Medical Corps, three years.  Enlisted 14 July 1915. Arrived in England 21 July 1916. Returned to Australia 23 May 1917, for nursing duties. Discharged 17 July 1917.  Awarded British War Medal.

SHOLDIS, Corporal, WILLIAM, Royal Army Medical Corps, Australian Contingent. From Castle Road, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

James Sholdis and Thomas Sholdis, of Castle Road,  were killed  on 10 June 1916, and 29 May 1918 respectively.

 

SHORT, Private, PATRICK, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) (Lance Corporal) P Short, Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

SHORTREED, Bombardier, A P, Royal Garrison Artillery.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SHORTREED, Trooper, T D, 28 Siege Brigade.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SIGLEY, THOMAS,  Born Philipstown, Ireland ( possibly Co Louth. ). Age 44 years and 8 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation Engine Smith. Next-of-kin, Mrs Margaret Sigley, 82 Herbert Street, Spring Hill, Brisbane, Australia, wife.  Previous military experience, 11 Years Queensland Irish Volunteers (disbanded). Enlisted 3 October 1916. Discharged 13 November 1916 following representations from his wife who said that ‘my health is very bad and that I have five children ranging from twelve years to six weeks  respectively and the salary he receives at present scarcely enables me to provide for them under the present condition. I wish to state that at the time of his enlistment was ill in bed and was unaware of his actions … his age being 47 years…’.

 

SIMPSON, JAMES BOYLE. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

SIMPSON, Private, R, Royal Army Medical Corps. From McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SIMPSON, WILLIAM. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

SLAVIN, OWEN. From 25 Dublin Street. Disabled survivor of the Lusitania. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SMART, Sergeant, DAVID EDWARD, 2313, 22 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force,  Born St Mary’s, Drogheda, Co Meath. Age 30 years. Presbyterian. Occupation Gardener.  Next-of-kin,  Mrs D E Smart,  Green Square, Alva, Scotland, (wife).  Previous military experience, 4 years , 2nd Battalion Black Watch. Enlisted 20 July 1915. To Egypt 1 February 1916. Etaples,  France March 1916. Gunshot wound left arm and face 27 July 1916. To England 31 August 1916. Remainder of war in England carrying out training duties. Charged with neglecting to obey orders in that he was in Swallowcliffe at 12.20.a.m.on 4.11.17 without (permission). Reprimanded.  27 March 1919 ‘Brought to notice of Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered.’ Back in Australia 11 October 1919. Discharged 12 December 1919. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal

Census 1911, at house 21 Coolatin, Co Wicklow, David Edward Smart , age 25, born Co Meath. Occupation Gardener/Domestic Servant. Presbyterian. Mary Smart, wife, age 28, born Scotland, Presbyterian.

Certified copy of marriage certificate on file records  David E Smart of Coolatin, Co Wicklow, age 26, married Mary Birnie, of 24 Green Square, Alva on 3 January 1911, under the rites of the Church of Scotland, in Green’s Temperance Hall, Alva. 

 

SMITH, JOSEPH, Royal Navy. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SLATTERY, Gunner, C, 54 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. From Stationhouse, Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Served in Salonika and France. .

The district of Greenore was searched by Crown forces on Monday after the shooting the previous night of Constable Hay, an Englishman with six months service in the Royal Irish Constabulary, and Charles Slattery, a young ex-soldier who had been employed in the service of the Greenore Railway Company. Two arrests were made by the Dundalk police, Stephen Rafferty and Patrick Larkin, both of whom are in the railway service. The prisoners were brought to Dundalk and were handed over to the military. Constable Hay is still seriously ill in Newry Hospital. (Irish Times, 23 March, 1921)

 

SMITH, Corporal, B, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 20 May 1916) and again (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

SMITH, B, Royal Naval Reserve. Serving ‘somewhere’ in the navy.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMITH, Private, C, Lincolnshire Regiment (16185). From County Louth. Wounded.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SMITH, FRANCIS, Royal Navy. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMITH, HARRY, Royal Irish Rifles. From North Road, Drogheda. Formerly of ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMITH, H St G RAF. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

SMITH, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. Reported missing.

(Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

SMITH, Private, J, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Formerly of the The Dale, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMITH, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

SMITH, J J, Worked in Dundalk Post Office. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

SMITH, JAMES, Royal Garrison Artillery.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMITH, Private, JAMES, Leinster Regiment. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

SMITH, M S S, Women’s Legion

 

SMITH, P, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Colpe, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SMYTH, Private, PATRICK, 1 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Downey’s Cottages, Windmill Lane, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SORAGHAN, Rifleman, THOMAS, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Allardstown, Kilkerley, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

SPEARS, G, HMS Lion. From Mountain View, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

SPEARS, First Lieutenant, REGINALD R, Royal Army Service Corps. From Mountain View, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SPLANE, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Peter Street, Drogheda. Formerly section commander of ‘C’ company Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

STAINES, Bombardier, -, 1 Battalion Connaught Rangers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

STANLEY, Sergeant, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

STANLEY, JAMES, Royal Navy. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

STANLEY, PATRICK. From Blackrock, Dundalk. Discharged. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

STARKIE, Lieutenant, J K, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk.

Mr. Starkie, lately science master at St Mary’s College and formerly of the staff of the Dundalk Technical School, has received a commission in the Royal Irish Rifles. Mr Starkie served previously in the South African War.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 December 1914)

 

STEPHENS, PATRICK, from Annagassan. In the navy. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

STEWART, RICHARD THOMAS, 343,  9 Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth,  age 20. Church of Ireland. Occupation Station Hand. Previously 4 years as a clerk with Great Northern Railway Dundalk. Next-of-kin,  Richard Thomas Stewart,  c/o Plympton Post Office, Plympton,  South Australia, father.  Church of England.  Enlisted 19 October 1914. To Gallipoli  16 May 1915. To hospital ship 12 June 1915 ‘shrap(nel )wound back pen(enetrated) Spine severe’. Transferred to Malta 20 June 1915. To England 6 July 1915. To Australia 7 November 1915. Landed 21 December 1915. Discharged  5 May 1916, medically unfit. Two letters from Pte Stewart in January and February 1927 looking for copies of his discharge papers. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

1911 Census: Richard Thomas Stewart, age 17, lived at 45 Broughton Street, Dundalk, Co Louth. Occupation Clerk.  Father , Richard Thomas Stewart,  age 47, Railway Foreman.  Mother  Jane Stewart, age 41, Seven siblings, including William John, see below.  All born Co Louth.

 

STEWART, Sapper, WILLIAM, Royal Engineers. From 47 Castle Road, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916). See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers

 

STEWART, WILLIAM JOHN,  2832, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Ireland.  Age 18. Church of Ireland. Occupation Blacksmith’s Striker. Next-of-kin, Mrs Jane Stewart, Plympton Post Office, South Australia, mother.  Previous military service, Senior Cadets (still serving).  Enlisted 29 January 1916. Embarked from Australia 20 February 1916. In France 17 May 1916. Tunnelling Company 29 September 1916. To hospital England with influenza 13 February 1917. To France 14 April 1917. Wounded in action (Gas) 7 March 1918. Rejoined unit 19 April 1918.Charged March 3, 1919, absent without leave, 12 February 1919 to 23 February 1919. Awarded 11 days Field Punishment No 2. Returned to Australia 7 July 1919. Discharged 21 November 1919.  Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal . See also Stewart, Richard Thomas.

 

STITT, J A, Royal Artillery. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000) see entry following.

 

STITT, W A, son of Mr W R Stitt, of the Boyne Mills, has obtained a commission. A popular cricketer and vocalist. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

Drogheda Officer gain distinctions. T/Capt Wm Hewitt Stitt MC, Royal Irish Fusiliers attached Royal Dublin Fus.) a son of Mr W R Stitt, Wellington Park, Belfast, Chairman of the Boyne Spinning Company, has received the DSO for gallantry. When the battalion was entirely surrounded by the enemy this officer carried out a personal reconnaissance of the bridgeheads which were both occupied by the enemy. He ascertained the enemy’s password and dispositions and then led the column over the bridge, killing one of the sentries himself. Further on finding the enemy in possession of a village he again reconnoitred abd ascertained their dispositions, getting their his column safely through and rejoining our line, bringing with him some ten officers and 350 other ranks. Lieut James A Stitt, another son has gained the Military Cross and both brothers are at present at home on leave. ( Drogheda Advertiser, September 1918(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

 STOKES, Lance-Corporal, E, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 1 July 1916)

 

STOWELL, Warrant Officer, ROBERT, Royal Naval Reserve. From 12 St Mary’s Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SULLIVAN, -, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From West Gate, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SULLIVAN, Private, B, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

SULLIVAN, EDWARD, Leinster Regiment. From West Street Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SULLIVAN, JAMES, 126125, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 6 August 1882,  Drogheda Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Teamster. Previous service, three years in the Royal Irish Constabulary. Next-of-kin  Mrs Annie Moor(e), York Road (Barracks?),  Belfast.  Attested on 2 September 1915, Berlin, Ontario, Canada.

 

SULLIVAN, JOHN, from Annagassan. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

SULLIVAN, Private, P, Leinster Regiment. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SULLIVAN, Petty Officer, ROBERT, Royal Navy later Private in RAF. Caretaker in civilian life.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

SUTHERLAND, EDWARD, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

SUTHERLAND, Private, GEORGE C, 4 Battalion Seaforth Highlanders. From 19 Vincent Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SUTTON, THOMAS. Attested twice

2025151, 50 Regiment Reinforcements, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  General Delivery, Victoria, British Columbia.  Born 6 August 1882, Drogheda, Ireland. Religious affiliation,  Church  of England. Occupation Teamster. Next-of-kin,  Mrs L Moore, R.I.C. Barracks, Greencastle, Ireland, sister.  Previous military service, three years, Royal Canadian Regiment, Halifax. Attested on  5 December 1916 at Victoria, British Columbia. 

 

2706278, 11 Battalion, Canadian Garrison Regiment,   Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 6 August 1882, Co Louth, Ireland.  Religious affiliation Church  of England. Occupation Teamster. Next-of-kin,  Mrs Lizzie Moore, Greencastle, Co Down, sister.  Previous military service, three years, Royal Canadian Regiment. Attested on 11 March 1919, at Vancouver, British Columbia. 

 

SWETTENHAM, Major, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Jenkinstown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

SWIFT, JOHN,  2 Battalion, King’s Own Royal Lancasters. Born in Dundalk 1896. Moved to Dublin 1912 and to London 1917. Arrested for absenteeism under the Military Service Acts, imprisoned and then drafted into the army as a conscientious objector, served in France. General Secretary of Irish Bakers’ Confectioners and Allied Workers Amalgamated Union from 1943 to 1947. President of the Dublin Trade Union Council and Iris Trade Union Congress.  Died in Dublin 19190. His memoir  Told in Toberona – A Memoir (Published by Watchword, 146 Sundrive Toad, Dublin 12) was published in 2008.

 

SWIFT, Lance-Corporal, M J, 1 Battalion  Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

SWIFT, Lance-Corporal, MICHAEL, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From North Road, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TAAFFE, Private, P, 12 Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 1 Chapel Street, Dundalk.

Amongst those at present in hospital in Birmingham is Pte P Taaffe, of the 12th Dublin Fusiliers. Pte Taaffe, who formerly resided at No 1 Chapel Street, Dundalk, was severely wounded in the right arm on 13th July last. He is progressing very favourably. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 September 1916)

 

TAAFE, Major, Smarmore Castle, also his son

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

TAAFE, Private, PATRICK, Irish Guards. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

TAAFE, PETER, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Prisoner of War.

Mr Macardle has had a letter from Peter Taaffe, of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who is a prisoner of the Germans since the battle of Mons, in which  he was thrice wounded. Taafe is a native of Broomfield, where his uncle lives, but lived on Castletown Road, Dundalk, prior to enlistment, and his mother and young sister live there still. He writes that he has a chum from Seatown sharing his captivity, but does not mention his name. He says they would be glad to get groceries, bread or cakes, and cigarettes, and gives directions on how they should be sent. “I must have a holiday at Blackrock, “ says the writer, “when I get home: and I hope it will be soon.” (Dundalk Democrat, 26 June 1915)

 

TAGGERT, T W, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Wynne’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

TEELING, Private, JAMES, 2 Battalion, Leinster Regiment. See George Teeling below.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TEELING, Private, GEORGE, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Both the Privates Teeling belong to no. 12 Bolton Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TEMPEST, Sapper, H G, Royal Engineers. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Sapper Harry Tempest, who less than three months ago joined the Royal Engineers and passed the test examination at Southampton as a “skilled” draughtsman, has been ordered to join the Base Camp in France.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 August 1916)

See TEMPEST, Second Lieutenant, W C (TREVOR) below. 

 

TEMPEST, NORAH, Scottish Women’s Hospital for Serbia. From Douglas Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Mrs A Coulter (Miss Nora Tempest) is to deliver an illustrated lecture in the Town Hall on Thursday evening next, for the benefit of the Red Cross on her experiences in Serbia. Our readers will remember that this plucky and adventurous young Dundalk lady, who was doing Red Cross work with the Serbian Army took part in the dreadful retreat of the Serbs from the Danube front through the pathless Albanian mountains in the dead of winter – a retreat in which thousands perished of cold, hunger and fatigue in the moist savagely inhospitable tract in Europe. We have been awaiting with keen interest the story of her experiences and we are sure she will tell it to a packed and appreciative house on Thursday evening. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 March 1917)

 

TEMPEST, Second Lieutenant, W C (TREVOR), Royal Flying Corps. From Douglas Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

A week or so ago we mentioned that Mr E Ward, solicitor, had joined the ‘fliers’. It appears he did not go alone as he has been joined by Mr Trevor Tempest (younger son of Mr Wm Tempest. J P) and Mr Charlie O’Hagan (son of the late Mr John O’Hagan, Belfast Bank). Mr Tempest’s eldest son, Harry, joined the Engineers about a year ago and has been for months in France.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 March 1917)

           

We are sorry to hear that Lieut Trevor Tempest R F C, has been missing for the pasty two weeks or so. He had been in France for some time and had a good deal of experience of aerial welfare, went out as usual  with his squadron, and did not return. Beyond this up to the present, nothing is known. But the flying men have all sorts of extraordinary adventures. More than one of them has come down well behind enemy lines, laid perdu, and then got back as opportunity afforded. They have plenty of friends amongst the Belgian and French civilians in the territory occupied by the Germans. Let us hope that this, or something like this, will be found true of Trevor Tempest. He is the younger son of the late Mr Wm Tempest J P and for a time before he joined up, assisted in the management of his father’s business and by customers of the firm and his social intimates was exceedingly well likes being a lad of frank and pleasant manners and friendly disposition. (Dundalk Democrat, 13 July 1918)

 

It was reported in town last evening (we hope the rumour is well-founded) that Lieut Trevor Tempest of the Flying Corps who was reported missing five weeks ago has been heard from , that he is wounded and a prisoner in Germany and getting on well. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 July 1918)

 

TOAL, MICHAEL, Royal Navy. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

TODD, Driver, H, Royal Army Service Corps. From John Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

THOMAS, PATRICK, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

THOMPSON, ANDREW (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

THOMPSON, R, Royal Field Artillery. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

THORNTON, Private, BERNARD, Irish Guards. From Castletown, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

THORNTON, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916)

 

THORNTON, JOSEPH. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

THORNTON, Private, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

THORNHILL, Colonel, C. From Abbey House, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

THORNHILL, Sub-Lieutenant, HUMPHREY, Royal Navy, HMS King George V. Son of Colonel C Thornhill. Abbey House, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

THORNHILL, Lieutenant, H B, 5 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Another correspondent points out that Lieutenant H B Thornhill gave up a good post in the Federated Malay States to rejoin his regiment – the 5th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers – though officers from the East had not been recalled.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

           

Recruiting in Co Louth

Meeting at Louth.

On last Sunday, Lieutenant Thornhill, recruiting Officer for Co. Louth, addressed the congregation after leaving Mass. Mr John Byrne, Louth, introduced him to the gathering.

Lieut. Thornhill explained that the Recruiting Department were anxious to bring home to the people in a quiet friendly way the requirements of the Army. Whilst admitting that Louth and district had done very well, having sent almost 50 to the colours, still more men were wanted, and it would be a pity not to provide more help in the new Irish Army, and to fill up the gaps that in the ordinary way must occur. He also dwelt on the danger the country was in if Germany should secure a victory. Every man present would feel the effects in taxes: the huge costs of the war would have to be borne. At all costs victory must be secured

The meeting gave a cordial hearing to Lieut. Thornhill’s address.

(Dundalk Democrat, 11 December 1915)

 

THORNHILL, JOHN CECIL, of Rathmullan. Father of two children, Phyllis and Peter John (born 29 July 1912) Described as a gentleman and husband of Florence Augusta. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

THORNHILL, KATHLEEN, Red Cross, Military Hospital, Warminster. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

TIGHE, Private, PATRICK. Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TORMAY, WILLIAM, Leinster Regiment. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda. Formerly of ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TOWNLEY, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

 

TRAINOR, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

 

TOWNLEY, JAMES, Royal Irish Rifles. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TOWNLEY, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TRACEY, PATRICK, 5 Lancers. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TRACEY, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TRAYNOR, Gunner,  FRANCIS, 28809, 1st Reinforcement Heavy Battery, Australian Imperial Force,  age 29 and one month. Born Parish of St John, Dundalk (sic).  Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin, Elizabeth Traynor, Post Office, Newcastle, New South Wales (sister). Previous military experience,  Royal Engineers one and a half years, (medically unfit).  Enlisted 18 April, 1916.  At sea, on 13 October 1916 charged with conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline. Awarded 168 hours detention. To England 5 November 1916. Last paid at Parkhouse Camp 30 November 1916.  Absent Without Leave from  30 November 1916. Declared absentee by Court of Enquiry held at AIF Head Quarters London, 27 February 1917.  Discharged from AIF 1 April 1920 in consequence of desertion.  Letter to sister 20 April 1923 seeking information as to his whereabouts returned undelivered.

 

TRAYNOR, Private, P, Royal Irish Regiment. From Dromintee, Co Armagh. Wounded, shell-shock (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

 

TRAYNOR, Stoker, THOMAS, Royal Navy. From Carrickedmond, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

TREADWELL, ROBERT, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

TRIMBLE, MOSES, Royal Irish Rifles. Formerly a printer in the Drogheda Advertiser. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TUITE, Cattleman, JAMES, From St Brigid’s Terrace, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

TUITE, Lance-Corporal, T, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Reported  wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916)

 

TUMULTY, R, Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

TURNER,  Irish Guards. From Dundalk.

In the battalion of the Irish Guards now undergoing training there are over forty Dundalk lads. One of them, a son of J W Turner, has been raised to non-commissioned rank. Amongst the others who ought to climb the military ladder are Jack Goodman and Patrick Rooney. The latter was assistant teacher in Dromiskin when the war broke out. We notice a statement in yesterday’s papers that owing to the failure of the Educational Authorities to provide substitutes or pay for teachers volunteering, only one Irish National Teacher has joined the colours. Apparently this is Mr Rooney. His uncle holds a captains commission in the artillery, having risen to that rank by sheer merit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 November 1914)

 

TWIBILL, Second Lieutenant, GERALD, Royal Field Artillery. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

(Home on leave) Mr Gerry Twibill, who was on active service in the R F A for some six months past, and who has been promoted to a commission.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 January 1917)

           

We hear that Mr Gerald Twibill, youngest son of Mr Wm Twibill, has received his commission in the RFA and has been ordered to take up duty at Chelmsford. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 October 1917)

 

VESEY, Captain, JOHN R M, Suffolk Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

WADE, JOHN. From Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

WAIDE, PETER, 47411, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 29 June 1880, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin, Hettie Waide, (address possibly reads “Homestead,  P A, W.L.D”.)  Previous military experience, 10 Grenadiers Toronto 3 weeks, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, 12 years  ?? days, India, Africa, Malta, Crete.  Attested on 28 September 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, Canada. Handwritten note records as follows  ‘Discharged Oct 31st `1917 “Physically Unfit” ‘.

 

WAKEFIELD, JOHN CHARLES, 112152,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 13 April 1890, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Boilermaker. Next-of-kin, Mrs Mary Frances Wakefield, 6 Hyde Gardens, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.  Previous military experience, 2 years 32 Regiment, has Sergeant’s certificate. Attested on 26 January 1915, at London, Ontario, Canada.

 

WALKER, ERIC, son of Mr W J D Walker, C B, Drogheda, has obtained a commission.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL, Private, -, Irish Guards. From Duleek, Co Meath.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL, Sergeant, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL, Private, JAMES, Connaught Rangers. From John’s Gate, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL, Private, PATRICK, Irish Guards. From John’s Gate, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL,  Private, THOMAS, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From John’s Gate, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALL, Private, WILLIAM, King’s Own Scottish Borderer’s. From John’s Gate, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALLACE, CHRISTOPHER P, 15 Battalion, 5 Infantry Brigade, Australian Contingent. From Kilkerley, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

In a letter home, Private Christopher p Wallace, late of Milltown, Kilkerley, sends all his friends his best wishes and hopes to soon return. Private Wallace left for Australia in March, 1914, and was there three months when the war broke out. He joined the Australian Contingent, 15th Battalion of the 5th Infantry Brigade, did six months training in Australia and then went to Egypt, whence after three weeks, he was sent to the Dardanelles. His letter shows him in high spirits and he shows it in his finish: “If I don’t come home, what about it!”

(Dundalk Democrat, 30 October 1915)

 

WALLACE, Captain, J, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WALLACE, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

WALLACE, MICHAEL,  from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

WALLACE, PATRICK. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WALLACE, V, Irish Guards. From Seafield, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WALSH, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mary Street, Drogheda. Formerly worked in Drogheda Railway station.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALSH, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WALSH, PATRICK JOSEPH, 3186203, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 24 Fifth Street, South Boston, Mass. USA.  Born Drumcondra, Co Louth (sic.). No religious denomination indicated. Occupation Teamster. Next-of-kin, Mrs Mary Walsh, Castle Street, Donegal, Ireland, mother. Attested on 18 July 1918 at Boston Mass. USA.

 

WALSH, Corporal, THOMAS, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Wounded September 1916.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Mrs Walsh, Church Street, has received intimation, that her son Corpl. Tom Walsh, has been wounded and is in hospital in England.

(Dundalk Democrat,16 September 1916)

           

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

WALSH, THOMAS C (nephew of M Clinton Esq. Annagassan). (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

WALSHE, THOMAS, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WARD, Drummer, -,  5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WARD, ALFRED, 204922, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address, 276 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada. Born 3 April 1890 in Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, Mrs Ashby, 5 Dorchester Street, Belfast, Ireland, sister. Attested on 18 September 1916 at Camp Hughes,  Carberry, Manitoba, Canada.

 

WARD, Lance-Corporal, F G, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WARD, Lieutenant, E, Royal Flying Corps. Solicitor, Ulster Bank House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918) No 4 Squadron, BEF France. (Tempest’s Annual 1919). Brother of Captain J H Ward, RAMC (see below)

Mr E G L Ward, solicitor, has joined the Flying Corps. That spells pluck of a high order – the more so as just at the time he joined there was one of the intermittent wails in some sensational newspapers as to the supposed inferiority of the British to the German Air-service. It is since that we have had the announcement that in one days fighting in the air, 15 German machines were smashed up and 24 more driven down behind their own lines with a loss of only two British. Mr Ward’s elder brother has been in the Army Medical service for some two years and spent a very considerable time in the front line at Ypres at a time when the town was the great objective of the Germans. We hope the new recruit will enjoy the same good fortune. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917).

 

Lieut. Eddie Ward was home on leave this week, and judging by his appearance the Flying Corps is a distinctly better place than the law-office – not to say a stuffy draughty law court, like that fine building with the classic portico that adorns the Market Square. (Dundalk Democrat, 15 September 1917).

 

Lieut. E G L Ward, R A F, has now been demobilised and has resumed his legal practice in Dundalk. Lieut Ward has been nearly two years with the flying force, one year on active service in France, and had the good luck to come through without a scratch. He chanced to be the airman of the Allied Force to fly over Lille after the German retirement from that city, and it was he who notified the land force of the fact. We had heard of that airman before, but without suspecting that it was our plucky, and lucky, townsman.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 March 1919)

 

WARD, Captain, J H, MB, Royal Army Medical Corps (S R)1 Cavalry Division. From Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) DSO, MC, MB (Tempest’s Annual 1919). Brother of Lieut. E Ward, RFC (see above).

Two young  Dundalk doctors – Dr Carroll and Dr Ward – have joined the army medical staff. They will, we fear, have no lack of practice if this war goes on for any length of time. Let us hope they will not find themselves amongst their “subjects” any of their fellow-townsmen.

(Dundalk Democrat, 10 August 1914)

 

Mr Ward, manager of the Ulster Bank, has received a letter form his son, Dr Ward, who is with the British Red Cross corps, and who was missing after the retreat from Mons. Dr Ward managed to evade the Germans, who took many of his colleagues prisoners; and after wandering for ten days in North-East France has rejoined and is again tending the wounded at the front.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 September 1914)

 

(Death of Mr E Ward, Ulster Bank, Dundalk) … A pathetic incident in connection with this sad event was the return a few hours after Mr Ward’s death of his eldest and favourite son, Hubert, who has been labouring devotedly at the front since the outbreak of the war as a surgeon in the Army Medical Staff. Dr Ward had got three days leave after months of incessant work in the very heart  of the recent heavy fighting and hastened home to cheer his ailing father’s heart as nothing else would have done. He reached Dundalk to find that father, to whose side he had hastened with so much filial love, was no more. Need we say that to him, as to Mrs Ward and other members of the family, public sympathy goes out unstintedly… (Dundalk Democrat, 5 June 1916)

           

Captain Ward, RAMC, was home this week on a brief furlough and has gone back on duty. He is now attached to a Hussar regiment as regimental surgeon. Captain S M Cox RAMC who has been in Malta all winter along with Captain Lavery, is home on leave. Our doctors are doing their bit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 April 1916)

 

Captain J. H. Ward RAMC writing to a friend in Co Louth the other day had the following interesting note: “Two days ago I saw the good old Dundalk Motor Ambulance in the 1st Cavalry workshops undergoing repair. It is to be repainted. When this is done I will try and get it photographed and will send you a copy. This is properly styled the ‘Dundalk and Co. Louth Motor Ambulance’. It was provided by the very generous ‘town and county’ subscription over two years ago, and has been at work ever since. Probably some of those who put up the money for it hardly expected to hear of it surviving two years of such rough usage as a motor ambulance has to endure in France. As a matter of fact it has had its narrow squeaks. The hood was blown off while it was doing its splendid work of bringing the wounded back from the firing line at Ypres in April, 1915; but no one was hurt, so it may be regarded as one of the lucky caravans. It must have been quite a friendly meeting, that of Captain Ward with the battered and worn, but still useful ambulance that has carried the colours of Co Louth during the two years of such experiences on the Western battle field. (Dundalk Democrat 10 March 1917)

 

Another Dundalk man who has not forgotten Dundalk is Captain Hubert Ward, R A M C. Writing from France and forwarding £2 for the Coal Fund, he says the description of the local blizzard in the ‘Democrat’ convinced him of the necessity of the Fund. Over in Northern France the winters are as a rule more severe than in our island – a fact which geographers explain by talking of ‘continental climate’ and the influence of the Gulf Stream. As a matter of fact the men in the trenches know more about blizzards than we do, though actually in the country which somebody has called ‘the sunny land of France’.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 January 1918)

 

Dundalk, which has sent so many of it best and bravest sons to do their part in the present war, is to be congratulated on another distinction won by Lieut-Colonel J F Ward who has been awarded the D S O and has had the privilege of being decorated on the Field. Lieut-Col Ward has been on continuous service with a Cavalry Division since the very beginning of the war, and is now in command of No 1 Cavalry Field Ambulance. He has been previously mentioned in despatches and only recently we had the pleasure of announcing that he had gained the Military Cross. (Dundalk Democrat, 22 June 1918)

 

WARD, Private, P, Royal Engineers. From Railway Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WARD, Private, P, Munster Fusiliers. From Ardee. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

WARD, THOMAS, 3186159, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 58 Dunstin Street,  Brighton, Mass.  USA. Born 18 April 1878, Ardee, Co Louth.  No religious denomination indicated.  Occupation Carpenter. Next-of-kin, Jane Buckley,  58 Dunstin Street,  Brighton, Mass.  USA, sister. Attested on 5 July 1918, at Boston, Mass. USA.

 

WARNOCK, Private, DANIEL, 100 Provisional Battalion. From Market Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WARREN, Private, FRANK, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

WATERS, F, Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WATT, HUGH JAMES, 1843 Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant, then  2nd Lieutenant, Ordnance Corps, Australian Imperial  Force,  born Drogheda, Co Louth.  Age 28 years and 7 months. Church of England. Occupation Malster. Address c/o Castlemaine Brewery . Brisbane, Queensland. Next-of-kin, originally   Mr A Watt, Provincial Bank, Dublin, brother,  then Mrs Emily Watt,  19 Cabra Place, Phibsboro, Dublin, wife.  Previous Military Service, 5 years Irish Vol. (sic).  Enlisted as private 26 January 1915. To Gallipoli 22 July 1915. Wounded left arm, Gallipoli 1915. To Alexandria 4 January 1916. To France 18 March 1916. Wounded left thigh France 1916. To England with inflammation of the stomach 22 April 1917. To France 11 November 1917.   To England, leave 11 October 1918. Promoted to 2nt Lieutenant 31 January 1919. Returned to Australia  23 August 1919.  Appointment Terminated 13 December 1920. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Letter to 2nd Lt Watt

18 December 1919.

Base Records Office

31st October 1919.

            Dear Sir

I have much pleasure in forwarding hereunder copy of extract from Fifth Supplement No 51370, to the London Gazette, dated 3rd June 1919, relating to conspicuous service rendered by yourself, whilst serving in the Australian Imperial Force

Awarded the Meritorious Service Medal

His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Meritorious Service Medal to the under-mentioned Warrant Officer, in recognition of valuable services rendered with in e armies in France and Flanders:

No  1843   Conductor  M.J, Watt.

The above has been promulgated in Commonwealth of Australia Gazette,  No 113,

Major

I/C Base records 

This W.O. has carried out his duties in a very able manner, and, during the period 17th September 1918 to 31st December 1918 in particular, has shown remarkable keenness and capability. Owing to numerous changes in the Staff, much additional responsibility has been thrown on him, and he has performed everything to my entire satisfaction.'

Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 113

Date: 6 October 1919

1901 Census: Hugh James Watt, age 16, lived at 3 New Quay,  Westgate,  Drogheda, Co Louth, occupation scholar.  Born Co Louth. Father  Andrew Watt, age 50, occupation Corn Clerk, born Scotland. Mother  Alexandra Watt,  age 40, born Co Louth. Hugh James is eldest child, there were four others including a brother Alexander. All children born Co Louth.  Family at No 2 New Quay, Westgate, Drogheda. 

 1911 Census. Hugh and Alexander Watt  are shown living as a boarders in 33 Charleville Road, North Circular Road. Glasnevin, Dublin, occupation,   Distillery Clerk and Bank Clerk respectively. 

WATTERS, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

WATTERS, Sergeant, JOSEPH, Connaught Rangers. From Ivy House, Dunleer. ‘Was at the front, and got home for a few days; is now gone back.’

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

WATTERS, Nurse, Miss G, Red Cross Hospital, Dublin Castle.  From Kincora House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WATTERS, Nurse, Miss C, Lemnos, Mediterranean. From Kincora House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WATTERS, Private, N. Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

WATTERS, PETER, 3021, 29 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, age 26 years and two months.  Born Dundalk, Co Louth. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin,  Peter Watters, Rosey Brook (sic) , Ardee, Co Louth, father. Enlisted 18 January 1916. Roman Catholic. Arrived  England 16 June 1916, to  France 6 September 1916. To hospital France, sick, 26 November 1916, to hospital in England influenza, 21 December 1916. Return to Australia 27 July 1917. Discharged 9 November 1917. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal . Letter from Pte Watters, to Officer in Charge, Base Records enquiring re certificate which should have been issued with Kings Silver Medal, 26 October 1949.  Home address  was  Colac Post Office, Colac, Victoria, Australia.  Certificate issued 20 October 1949. Died 21 November 1959.

 

WATSON, Nurse, Sister D, Malta. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Sister D Rowan Watson (of Dundalk) writes us from St Andrew’s Military Hospital, Malta, this week: - “Would you kindly thank all kind friends in Dundalk (through your paper), for their great goodness in sending comforts to me for the wounded here. The Red Cross Society have been more than kind. They sent me one large case of things and last week I received a cheque for £5 to buy extras for the poor men; and today I got a large case of cakes from friends. I can’t tell you how grateful the poor men are for any little thing.”

(Dundalk Democrat, 4 September 1915)

 

Mrs Murgatroyd will be glad to receive and forward to the great military hospital at Malta, in which her sister, Miss Watson, is nursing wounded soldiers from the Dardanelles, gifts of fresh eggs and unsweetened milk. In a recent letter Miss Watson mentions that these are much needed, but that cigarettes, being supplied in plenty, are not now required. (Dundalk Democrat, 6 November 1915)

 

A lot of the boys and girls are drifting home from the battlefields… Miss Dora Watson, who has had remarkable experiences as a nurse in Malta, Cairo and Mesopotamia, has reached home. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 January 1919)

 

WATSON, JOHN L A, Cadet Corps, 197 (sic) Royal Irish Rifles, From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

WAYTE, 2nd Lieutenant, JOHNSTONE. Royal Irish Rifles. Wounded. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

WELDON, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

 

WELDON, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. ‘In training in Cork.’ From Collon

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916) (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WHEELER, Private, W E, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Chapel Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

WHELAN, Sergeant, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WHELAN, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 December, 1917)

 

WHITE, FRANCIS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Rathmullen Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WHITE, THOMAS, Royal Navy. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

  

WHITE, PATRICK JAMES, 105685, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Winnipeg, Manitoba. Born 13 March, Co Louth, Ireland. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Occupation Marine Fireman.  Next-of-kin, Patrick White, Co Louth.  Attested on 31 December , 1915 at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

WHITE, PETER, Royal Navy. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WHITE, Warrant Officer, W A J, Education Department. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WHITEHOUSE, Driver, J, 129 Battery, Royal Field Artillery. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WHITELEY, A, Royal Field Artillery. From 30 Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WHITLEY, Private, Suffolk Regiment.. From Heynestown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

WHITNEY, HARRY, Army Reserve. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WHITTY, Lieutenant, J L, Royal Army Service Corps. From Drogheda. On six months leave of absence from Ceylon had been granted permission by the Government of the Colony to join the Imperial Service. Has been granted a commission. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

WHITTY, Lieutenant, W, Brother of Mr B Q Whitty, Manager, Belfast Bank, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

  

WILLIAMS, Trooper, CHARLES, 8 Hussars. From River Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMS, Private, GEORGE, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From River Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

  

WILLIAMS, GEORGE, Royal Field Artillery. From Barrack Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMS, Gunner, HENRY, ‘P’ Battery, Royal Horse Artillery. From River Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMS, H. From Mill Street, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMS, Private, JOHN, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From River Lane,  Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

 

WILLIAMS, Private, R, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

WILLIAMS, Gunner, ROBERT, 8 Mortar Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. From River Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMSON, Nurse, Miss Mary, Alexandria. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMSON, Second Lieutenant, T B, 11 Battalion Sherwood Foresters. From Jocelyn House, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILLIAMSON, HENRY CARSON, 467639, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Athabasca, Alberta, Canada. Born 21 April, 1895, Dundalk Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation ?? Clergy.  Next-of-kin, Hueston Maxwell Williamson, Jocelyn House, Dundalk, Co Louth, father. Attested on 10 March 1916, at Athabasca, Alberta, Canada.

WILLIAMSON, Private, H, Royal Canadians. From Jocelyn House, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Jan 9th Am going back to 3rd (indecipherable) D Coy, Seaford on Friday. So don’t write here any more but use the old add. Will try for leave right away and will write as soon as possible.

(Postcard dated 9 January 1916, addressed to Mrs H M, Williamson, Jocelyn House, Dundalk, Co . Louth in possession of DH)

 

WILSON, Private, -, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WILSON, ALAN. Royal Navy. From Bellurgan, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

WILSON, Private, ARTHUR, 2 Division, 4 Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WILSON, Captain, CLAUD, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dulargy, Ravensdale. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WILSON, J. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WINTER, Lieutenant, PHILIP H, Royal Army Service Corps. Son of Mrs Winter, St. Peter’s Place, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

WINTER, Second-Lieutenant, R, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Peter’s Place, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Lieutenant RLV Winter, Royal Irish Fusiliers, youngest son of th elate Rev A Winter, Rector of Ballyconnell and Philipstown, King’s County and of Mrs Winter, Grove Park, Dublin, late of the Alleys, Drogheda, has been reported by the British Red Cross to be a prisoner of war in Germany and in good health. (Drogheda Advertiser April 1918, McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

WOOD, Warrant Officer, Education Department. From Castle Road, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WOOD, Sergeant Major, WILLIAM, Royal Army Service Corps. From Castle Road, Dundalk.  (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WOODS, Electrician, GEORGE, HMS Rainbow. From Chapel Lane, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

WOODS, Private, P, Leinster Regiment. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WOODS, P, Royal Naval Reserve.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

WOODS, ROBERT, 1057372, 215 Battalion Overseas , Canadian Grenadier Guards,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 25 December 1877, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Driver.  Previous military experience, three years in the Lancers, England.  Attested on 24 February 1917, at Montreal  Canada.

 

WYKES, Private, A, Royal Irish Rifles, from Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,  30 September 1916) again (Dundalk Democrat, 29 December 1917), and again (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

WYKES, G, from Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

                                                                                       

¦ Introduction ¦ Abernethy - Durnan ¦ Earl - Knox ¦ Ladley - Myles ¦ Neary - Wykes ¦

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