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THE RETURNED ARMY

 

County Louth Servicemen in the Great War 1914 -1918

 

 

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¦ Introduction ¦ Abernethy - Durnan ¦ Earl - Knox ¦ Ladley - Myles ¦ Neary - Wykes ¦

  

LADLEY, Private, A, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 27 Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LADLIE, C H, Royal Navy. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LAMBE, JAMES, Leinster Regiment. From Greenhills, Drogheda. Section commander, ‘A’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LAMBE,  JAMES, Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

LAMBE, Private, THOMAS, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LAPPIN, W. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LARKIN, Private, JAMES, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From The Gardens, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LARKIN,  JAMES HENRY, 5164, 13th or 3rd Field Company Engineers, Australian Imperial Force.  Born Carlingford, Ireland. Age 44 years and 11 months. Roman Catholic. Widower.  Next-of-kin, Lizzie Doyle, Alameda, Elsham Street, Lewisham, Sydney, New South Wales, sister.  Enlisted 4 November 1915. To England , 14 September 1916  and then to France 4 December 1916. To England from Etaples, France,  13 February 1917. An application for a pension dated 27 September 1917 names his wife Josephine Mary Larkin, Eltham Street, London. Returned to Australia, Rheumatism, 8 April 1917. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

LARRISSY, Private, ANDREW, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 6 Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

LAUGHRAN, Private, R, Royal Garrison Artillery. From  Collon. ‘In training at Southampton. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

LAVERY, Captain, J P, Royal Army Medical Corps, Malta. From Roden Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

During the week Naval Engineer Lieut. Laurence Farnon, of Church Street, has been home on a short holiday. For some time past he has been in the Special Service Squadron doing duty at the Dardanelles, and while at Malta on his way home he say Lieut J P Lavery who, he states, is looking fit and well. Lieut Farnon himself does not look anything the worse for the exacting service on which he has been engaged. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 June 1915)

 

We were glad to see Lieutenant Lavery, RAMC, in town during the week, looking remarkably fit and well. We understand he came over from Malta as one of the doctors in charge of a troopship, bringing wounded soldiers to home hospitals, and that he is returning to Malta immediately.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 August 1915)

 

Captain Ward, RAMC, was home this week on a brief furlough and has gone back on duty. He is now attached to a Hussar regiment as regimental surgeon. Captain S M Cox RAMC who has been in Malta all winter along with Captain Lavery, is home on leave. Our doctors are doing their bit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 April 1916)

 

We had the pleasure of seeing Surgeon Lavery, R A M C in Dundalk this week. He spent the greater part of last year doing duty in the military hospitals in Malta, and as the relinquishment of the Gallipoli campaign relieves these hospitals of the greater part of the heavy work they had to do during its continuance the staff are being distribute where there is more need for them. Surgeon Lavery is now under the Irish Command, and will probably be attached to one of the Dublin Military hospitals. He looks remarkably well, after a trying and arduous experience. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916)

 

Some of our young Dundalk men who joined the army in the past year are just gone to the front. They include Lieuts. Roe, Brown, Flynn and Hall who are all serving in the same Irish Battalion. Surgeon Lavery has also gone to France to join the medical corps there. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

LAWRENCE, Private, C,  Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

At the Military Barracks on Thursday, Brigadier General Hacket Pain decorated Sergeant Chas Lawrence, R I R, son of ex-Quartermaster Sergeant Lawrence with the Military Meal and the Mons Star. In the official despatch the awards were given for most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the attack near Neuve Eglise on September 9, 1918. When without an officer he led his platoon to their objective using his Lewis guns very effectively. Later in the evening he did good work in stopping a counter attack by the enemy. Sergeant Lawrence was out with the First Expeditionary Force in August 1914, and during the campaign was wounded three times. His eldest brother was recently decorated with the DCM by Brigadier General Pain at Dundalk. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 June 1919)

 

See LAWRENCE, Lance Corporal, V J, Royal Irish Regiment.

 

LAWRENCE, J J, Recruiting Sergeant. From Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

From Barrack Street (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LAWRENCE, Corporal, C R, Royal Irish Regiment. From Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LAWRENCE, Private, M J, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

LAWRENCE W J, Royal Army Medical Corps,  from Barrack Street. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Private Lawrence R A M C who joined along with Pte. Jim Callan, is reported wounded. He is son of Sergeant Lawrence of the Recruiting Depot, Dundalk. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 January 1917)

 

LAWRENCE, Lance Corporal, V J, Royal Irish Regiment. From Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) From Barrack Street (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in command of his company. When the two officers and the senior N C Os had become casualties he continued to advance and with a mere handful of men established a strong point, and maintained our line close in front of an enemy machine-gun position.”

For this act, Sergeant V J F Lawrence R I R of Dundalk (son of Colour-Sergeant Lawrence) was on Tuesday presented with the Distinguished Conduct Medal by Brigadier-General Hacket Pain, Commandant of the Northern District. The presentation took place in the barracks in the presence of a good crowd, which included the Royal Scots, the men of the R I C, a large number of wounded soldiers and Boy Scouts. In making the presentation the Brigadier congratulated Sergeant Lawrence. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 July 1918)

           

            See LAWRENCE, Private, C,  Royal Irish Rifles.

 

LAWSON, A, Royal Irish Rifles. From 16 Brook Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LAWSON, Sergeant, J, Royal Irish Rifles. Son of Mr A Lawson, Manager, Manager of Lipton’s Drogheda. Joined Kitchener’s Army.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

Drogheda Soldier’s Distinction. Sergeant L Lawson, R I R, son of Mr A Lawson, Manager, Lipton’s Drogheda, has been awarded the Meritorious Medal for preventing a bomb explosion at considerable personal risk, while serving on the Balkan Front. (Drogheda Independent, 10 November 1917)

 

LEEBURN, G (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LELAND – GET  report DD 13 Nov 1915. “this is the third member of the C’Bellingham …”

 

LELAND, Major, F, Royal Army Service Corps.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LELAND, Colonel, F W H, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Son of Mr H Leland, late of Drogheda. Brother of  Second Lieutenant John  Henry Frederick Leland, 5 Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, killed in action on 10 August 1915. Son of Henry and Laura Jane Leland of 6 Idrone Terrace, Blackrock, Dublin.(CWGC) (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). Died 22 September 1943.

 

Drogheda Officer’s promotion – Colonel F W Leland, second son of Mr John Leland, Beltichburne has been appointed Director of Transport in Mesopotamia and leaves England shortly to take up his new duties.

(Drogheda Independent, 12 August 1916)

 

Francis W G Leland CMG, DSO Colonel RASC, 2nd son of John Leland, buried in Beaulieu. Born 20 August 1877, died 22 September 1943. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

LELAND, T P C, Royal Navy, HMS Urana. From 1 Mary Street, Drogheda. Son of Mr R Leland. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LELAND, Captain, THOMAS, wounded. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

LENNON, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

LENNON, Lance Sergeant, J. Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 May, 1916)

 

LENNON, Sergeant, M, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LENNON, Private, P, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Louth. Reported wounded and missing. (Dundalk Democrat, 15 July 1916).

 

LENNON, Private, STEPHEN. Royal Army Service Corps. From Lurgankeel, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LENNON, Private, T, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Mill House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LENNON, W, Royal Irish Rifles. Son of Mr Peter Lennon, Fair Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

Le PETON, J E, clerk of the Boyne Mills, also a popular concert artiste, footballer and cricketer.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LEWIS, Private, PETER, Royal Munster Fusiliers. From River Lane, Dundalk. Prisoner of war. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LINNANE, E J, worked in Post Office in Dundalk. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers

 

LISTON, Corporal, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Mary Street North, Dundalk.

 (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LIVINGS, Private, P, 7769, Royal Munster Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Prisoner of war.

See BENNETT, Private, P

 

LIVINGSTON, OSWALD. (Tempest’s Annual 1917). On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

LLOYD, Private, G, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Carnbeg, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LOCKHART, Sergeant-Major, W, North Irish Horse. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LONG, Lieutenant, BERTRAM, Royal Irish Rifles. Worked in Bank of Ireland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

LOUDON, Private, CHARLES H, 10 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Jocelyn Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

A second son of Mr Joseph Loudon, Dundalk (Charles Herbert), who was wounded in France last June and has been in hospital since then, has returned to the front accompanied by 100 men of his regiment, The Royal Irish Fusiliers. The draft when passing through Dundalk on Thursday presented a fine appearance and were in splendid spirits. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

(Corporal Benjamin H Loudon, 18 Battalion Durham Light Infantry, from Jocelyn Street, Dundalk, son of Joseph and Matilda Loudon, died of wounds on 12 July 1916. DH)

 

LOUDON, Private, C HERBERT, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Jocelyn Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

           

LOUDON, Adjutant-Major, J S, South African Horse. From Dundalk.

Mr Joseph Loudon has received a letter from his son, Adj-Maj J S Loudon, South African Horse, who has passed through the East African campaign (now nearing its close) without receiving a scratch, and as he had lived for years in its climate, he escaped the fevers that laid  so many of the white men low in that vast country of unending forest, slow moving rivers and swamps

            (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

 

LOUGHEED, Sergeant, JOHN C. Eldest son of Sergeant Lougheed, Royal Irish Constabulary, West Gate, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Wounded and prisoner in 1915. Died on 14 June 1924 aged 28 years as a result of a tragic shooting accident. He left a young wife and two infant daughters. He is buried with his parents, wife and daughter Phyllis (RIP May 2000) in St Mary’s Church of Ireland, Mary St., Drogheda. The gravestone bears the inscription ‘Not my will but Thine be done’

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

LOUGHEED, WILLIAM, Royal Engineers. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

LOUGHRAN, Gunner, R, Royal Irish Rifles. From Collon. ‘At present in France.’

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1915)

 

LOUGHRAN, PETER, 20 Regiment, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth.  Age 25. Occupation Farm Labourer. Next-of-kin, Michael Loughran, Adavoyle, Meigh, Co Armagh, father.  Enlisted  2 August 1915. Discharged 20 October 1915, “Disciplinary reasons”.

 

LOUTH, Private, P, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 5 Casey’s Row, Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LOVE, Private, FREDERICK,703,  C Company,30 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Ballymascanlan, Co Louth. Church of England. Occupation Labourer. Age 37. Next-of-kin, John Love, Ravensdale, Dundalk, father.  Enlisted 19 July 1915. To Suez  11 December 1915. Admitted to hospital Appendical abscess, 27 February 1916.  Returned to Australia for further treatment,  28 June 1916, discharged on medical grounds, 9 October 1916. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

1901 Census: At house 1 Bellurgan, Ballymascanlan, John Love, age 62, occupation, Farmer. Wife, Emily, age 48. Four children, Robert, Albert, Louisa and Frances.  John Jnr not present.  All born Co Louth. Church of Ireland. By 1911 Census John Love senior is living as an old age pensioner with John and Louisa Logan at house 24, Annaverna, Ravensdale, Co Louth. 

 

LOVE, RICHARD HAMILTON,  36 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, age 42 years and two months. Church of England. Occupation Engineer. Next-of-kin, Mr J Love, Dundalk. Ireland, father.  Enlisted 13 February 1916. Discharged 20 August 1916, ‘Medically Unfit (not due to misconduct). Another enlistment  document dated 6 June 1916, gives his serial no as 2626, 4th Regiment 35th Battalion. Next-of kin is Mrs L Logan, Annaverna, Ravensdale, Dundalk, Ireland, sister.  Previous military service is 44 days in 36 Battalion, discharged medically unfit.  To 3rd Light Mortar Battery  July to September 1916. Disembarked England 29 February 1917. Landed in France 26 February 1917. Wounded in the head 3 July 1917. To England 13 July 1917. To Australia 21 November 1917, discharged as medically unfit 28 December 1917. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

LUNHAM, W Irish Guards. From Water Lodge, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

LYNCH, EDWARD, Royal Navy. From Stockwell Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, Lance-Corporal, H, 2 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Castlebellingham, Co. Louth. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1917). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

(Possibly listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

LYNCH, J, Royal Navy, HMS Britannia.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, PATRICK, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. See THOMAS LYNCH

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, PETER, from Annagassan. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

LYNCH, THOMAS, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Brother of Patrick Lynch (above). Both are sons of Mr James Lynch, Corporation Cottages, Duleek Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYNCH, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

LYONS, J J, son of Mr J J Lyons, J P, Dublin and nephew of Alderman P Lyons, J P, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MACARDLE, Lieutenant, JOHN, B Battalion, 88 Brigade Royal Field Artillery. From St. Margaret’s,  Dundalk.(Tempest’s Annual 1916) Captain (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Brother of Second Lieutenant Kenneth Macardle, who was killed in action 9 July 1916. (DH)

 

Mr John Ross Macardle, St Margaret’s Dundalk, has been gazetted to a Second Lieutenancy in the 88th Brigade, Royal Files Artillery (19th Division) now stationed at Bulford. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 October 1914)

 

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

A copy of Lancaster paper sent us a report of the regimental sports of 7th Royal Lancasters, now in camp on Salisbury Plain, and presently destined for the front… Yet another officer in the division of which the battalion forms a unit is Mr “Jock” Macardle, of Cambrickville, who holds a commission in the 88th Brigade Royal Field Artillery. Our readers will remember that Mr Macardle joined as a private immediately after the outbreak of war, and after several weeks service was promoted to commissioned rank. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 July 1915)

 

Captain ‘Jock’ Macardle, son of Mr T C Macardle, High Sheriff of Louth, has been at home on leave. He enlisted as a private on the outbreak of the war, was advanced to a commission later, and has now attained his captaincy at the age of 24. This is something of a record. Captain Macardle, who has been in several big engagements, is exceedingly fit, and we hope to hear equally good accounts of him in the future. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 January 1917)

 

T/Lt. John Ross Macardle, R F A

(Award of Military Cross)

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His battery came under heavy fire, and the camouflage at one of the gun pits was set on fire. He at once ran in and extinguished it, and thus prevented the fire from spreading to the ammunition It was largely due to his gallant act that the battery was able to keep all its guns in action. (Supplement to the London Gazette, 22 March 1918)

 

In the last Gazette we notice that Lieut John Ross Macardle, 88th Brigade, R F A. elder surviving son of the High Sheriff of Louth, has been awarded the Military Cross. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 November 1917)

           

We take the following from the ‘London Gazette’ which gives the names of recent recipients of the military Cross with details of the service for which the Cross was conferred: - (Quotes citation in full) –

We congratulate our townsman. Capt Macardle was recently home on leave, but on that occasion he gave no details of the very gallant action which won him this merited and coveted distinction. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 March 1918)

 

Captain Macardle, R F A, son of Mr T Callan Macardle, D L, (who also has the Military Medal) has been home on short leave prior to leaving for a distant field of war. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 August 1918)

 

MACALISTER, Private, SAMUEL, Irish Guards. From St. Alphonsus Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MACMAHON, DERMOTT, Artillery Regiment. Formerly a reporter of the Drogheda newspaper. Obtained a commission in the Artillery Regiment having first joined the Royal Army Service Corps as a private. Well-known Association and Gaelic footballer and cyclist.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MACMAHON, HEBER, BA, Trinity College Officer Training Corps, Dublin.

(Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

MACKIN, P, Northumberland Fusiliers. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

MACOUN, Lieutenant, JAMES, Royal Engineers. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MACOUN, Private, STEWART, 45556, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Enlisted 27 August 1914. Next of kin Mrs M.J. Macoun, Aspinvale, Strandtown, Belfast. Noted as a casualty in register of St. Peter’s Church of Ireland, Drogheda. (JODS)

 

MAGUIRE, JOHN, 121880, 69 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 28 May 1889, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, Mrs Margaret Maguire, 69 Dane Street, Liverpool. Attested on 7 April 1916 at St  John, (New Brunswick or Newfoundland), Canada.

 

MAHER, D, was the first tenant of 21 Legion Avenue, Dundalk, which was owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

MALLY, Sergeant, HENRY, Leinster Regiment. Wounded. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MARKEY, EDWIN, 623000, 44 Overseas Battalion,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 4 April 1895, Ardee,  Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Clerk.  Next-of-kin Mrs Gardner Markey, 72 Creighton Avenue, East Ham,  London E6, wife.  Attested on 24 September 1915 at Camp Hughes, Carberry, Manitoba, Canada.

 

MARTIN, GEORGE, 811153, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 17 May 1875, County Louth, Ireland.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, Mary Martin, Reeston (Reaghstown?), Co Louth. Relationship not recorded.  Attested on 7 December 1915 at Edmonton,  Alberta, Canada.

 

MATHIAS, JOSEPH GEORGE, 273583, 216 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address, Cobalt, Ontario, Canada. Born 9 December 1874, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation,  Church of England. Occupation Travelling Salesman.  Next-of-kin, Florence Evelyn Mathias, 75 Nelson Road, Hornsey, London, England, wife. Attested on 18 May, 1916 at Cobalt, Ontario, Canada.

 

 McADOREY, Private, JAMES J, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

            Dundalk Guardsman at the front.

[The following extracts are from letters sent home by James M’Adorey (of Dundalk) who has been out with the Irish Guards for the past fifteen months]

Next day we were ready to march at a moment’s notice. … All the roads we had passed along since we left our resting place were nothing but troops everywhere, mostly cavalry. That day was just the limit – we had our packs on until eleven that night, and it poured the whole time, standing and sitting along the road the whole time. The officers told us that things were going on grand up at the front, and everywhere we saw – motor drivers, Flying Corps, or R.A.M.C. fellows – had all a different story. I thought we would never get to our billets, and then I thought of the retreat from Russia, 1812, and thought of the awful time they must have had. However  all the news we heard was good, so that made up for a lot. The billets we got that night was just a big hay-shed, like the one down at Castletown schools: there were horses in one part of it, and I was only a few yards from them, in fact they hacked down on me, and wakened me twice during the night, but when you are tired its no trouble to sleep any place. You have no idea of how and where we sometimes get down to it; that’s what we say when we are going to have a sleep, and sleep well, too, just as well as anybody, no matter how good a bed they have at home.

Next day we watched the wounded passing down the firing line, always ready, of course, to leave at a moment’s notice, but as the news was good we were all anxious to get up and see something for ourselves. This was Sunday. We left here about 2 o’clock that day and went on up to the reserve trenches, but although they were reserve trenches they were a long way from the firing line, and then after the advance it left them still further away. We got down to it the best way we could that night, but it was fine, although very cold.

I saw Fox the vet, who was in Clinton, pass that evening. I am not sure, but it was very like him. On Monday morning we went up to the firing line with shovels, and on our way we got shelled losing four or five men. Nearly all the shells were falling round the dressing station (an old farmyard) and I am sure it upset the nerves of the wounded greatly. On our way we passed over the ground where the advance had taken place. It was covered with dead – some with a pleasant face, others the picture of pain to the very end. That was on the Monday, and I won’t say anything about the German trenches, as I expect you saw all about them in the papers. It was surprising how well made they were; some of their dug-outs were down twenty feet under the ground, and there is no doubt about it, the Germans never thought they would be driven out of those trenches. They were well prepared for the winter, and everything showed they intended to stop in them for a long time so well were they made.

On Tuesday night we were up again digging. It was a lovely night, though very cold, and our big guns were going all the time. I watched the flash from the guns away behind us, then heard the reports, then I could hear the whiz of the shells going over our heads, and then listening for the noise when the shell burst over the German lines. I will never forget it all.

On Wednesday night our battalion went up and relieved the Munsters; they were in trenches just outside a village held by the Germans, but I think we have since taken it (you will see it on the map; I expect you know the place I mean). It was very cold, and no dug-out of any sort. I was at the end of the trench and bombs ready in case they should try and rush us, but it was quite ‘nothing doing’ only the artillery going all the time. Next morning I was asleep in the bottom of the trench when somebody wakened me,. It was poor Father Gwynn. He thought something high (sic) happen us and came round to give us absolution; that was the last time I spoke to him. I should have told you the night before a man got shot in the back in the place  I was watching out of; he was my relief, and it just happened as I was going to take his place.

Next morning we were relieved about 1 o’clock (this was Friday, the 1st), and on our way to billets we passed over the ground where the dead were still lying, but they had all been carried up and left in rows ready to be buried. I will never forget seeing all those dead with the moon shining on them. It was a sight to be remembered.

Well, after a hard march we got to billets, such as they were, and the next day I saw - -. He was grand although he told me he had been gassed, but not much. The only thing that was troubling him was the fleas, he was not used to them yet.

On the Sunday we again went up to the reserve trenches, and on Tuesday went to the firing line, and it was a very hot spot too. The Germans kept shoving over big “coal-boxes”, and they fell every place round me except right down in our trench; but I thought we would never get out of it, as there was a lot killed round there before we went to it, and since then sixteen of our fellows got knocked out there with one shell. But I kept a good look-out all the time, and I saw nearly every one of them coming, and once I got my eye on it and knew it was not coming on top of us, I shouted to all the fellows that we were safe from that one, and did my best to help those that were most afraid near me.

We then went to the support trench, and on the Thursday night went for rations, which we could not get as we missed them. It would take me too long to tell you how I spent that night wandering round a deserted village in ruins. I am getting tired, and I am sure you are too, trying to make out this, it’s very hard writing.

However, we went to the firing line again on Saturday, and when out C.O. Lieut. Madden and Father Gwynn were having lunch in their dug-out a shell came in on the front of it, with the result that Father Gwynn died a few days after, and our Colonel will never be the same man again – Castleknock College Chronicle (Dundalk Democrat, 1 July 1916)

 

Jim McAdorey, who was wounded by shrapnel in the left arm and side, is at present in hospital at Exeter. He has been for the best part of two years at the front, and up till now escaped without a scratch. He may be congratulated on his luck and his many friends will like to know that while his convalescence will be tardy he is going on all right. (Dundalk Democrat, 7 October 1916)

           

            Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

           

The latest information from Private Jim M’Adorey is that he is progressing well and hopes that he will get leave to come home after Christmas. He has to undergo a slight operation, but is very cheerful about it.

(Dundalk Democrat, 23 December 1916)

 

McALEAVEY, Private, JOHN, 24258, D Coy, 4 Battalion, South Wales Borderers. From 4 James’ Street, Dundalk.

 

McALEAVEY, Private, P, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Yorke Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McALESTER, Private, BENJAMIN, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Brunswick Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McALESTER, Private, S, Irish Guards. From St. Alphonsus’ Road, Dundalk. Wounded and prisoner-of-war. (TA1918)

During the week word reached Dundalk that Edward Doherty, of Chapel Street and Sam M’Alester (son of Mr Edward M’Alester of St Alphonsus Road), both of the Irish Guards, were missing since the big fight over a month ago in the Cambrai sector – a fight in which the Guards displayed a splendid heroism, of which the French papers speak enthusiastically, though few details of that affair have as yet appeared on this side. Mr Doherty who is a married man with a large family, is one of the family so long and well known in Dundalk as monumental sculptors. He joined the Irish Guards a couple of years ago and has been in many big engagements from which he emerged scatheless. Mr M’Alester, who is one of the finest and most popular lads of his generation in Dundalk, enlisted in the Irish Guards on the day that the news came to Dundalk of the death of his special chum Jack M’Parland, and has been in much of the recent fighting. It is quite likely that news will come later on the safety of both of these Dundalk men.  IN the fighting at Cambrai in the critical two weeks following Byng’s sensational dash the Germans claim to have taken 6,000 prisoners. It will be some time before details of the identity of these reach the outer world.

(Since the above was written, we hear that Mr M’Alester on yesterday had a post card from his son, who is a prisoner in Germany with a bullet wound in the arm, but doing well. He was – just as he might be expected to be – in the very forefront of the fighting: hence his capture after being wounded. This comparatively good news must encourage the friends of Pvte Doherty to hope for a similar message. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 January 1918) 

 

McALLISTER, ISAAC, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McALLISTER, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

MCALLISTER, ROBERT, 2497681, 14 Railway Construction Draft, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 128 Bowery, New York City, New York, USA.  Born 15 July 1871, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Sailor. Previous military service, twelve years in the 60th King’s Royal Rifles Corps. Next-of-kin, Robert McAllister, 12 Mary Street South, Dundalk, Co Louth, father. Attested on 7 July 1917 at Toronto, Canada.

 

McALLISTER, WILLIAM, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McARDLE, F, Royal Field Artillery. From Market Square, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McARDLE, FRANK, 6 Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Railway Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McARDLE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

McARDLE, MICHAEL, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 9 Castletown Road, Dundalk. Missing. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McARDLE, Private, OWEN, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dublin Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McARDLE, Corporal, OWEN, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 8 Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McARDLE, PATRICK,4549, 46 Battalion Australian Imperial Force.  Born Dundalk, Co Louth. Age 35 years and 10 months.  Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin Ethel McArdle, c/o R Dunlop, 28 Albert Street, Victoria, West Brunswick, wife. Enlisted 8 November 1915.  In England March 1917 and in France by July 1917.  Spent a great deal of time in hospital with heart problems.  Back in Australia 8 May 1919, discharged 10 November 1919.   Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

McARDLE, Corporal, T, 1 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers, 23 Cuchulainn Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MCARDLE, THOMAS, 2008874, Canadian Engineers, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address YMCA, Chicago. Illinois, USA. Born  8 May 1889, Co Louth, Ireland. No religious affiliation indicated. Occupation Fireman (Marine). Next-of-kin, Mrs Catherine McArdle, Mag Browns Cross, Ballybinaby, Co Louth. Attested on 29 April 1918, at Toronto, Canada.

 

McATEER, PETER, Royal Navy. From Annies, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McAULEY, Lieutenant, DANIEL JOSEPH, Labour Corps.

Born in Dublin 1868.

Enlisted in Royal Irish Rifles, 22/06/1885 serial no. 1225:

 

Served with the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles from 1885 - 1891.

Served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles from 1891 - 1899.

Served with the 6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles from 1899 - 1906.

 

Appears to have served in England and Ireland, for various periods between 1885 and 1891. He embarked for Malta with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on the 20th December 1891 where he served until the 18th November 1894. From there the Battalion was posted to Poona in India where he served until 1899. Posted to the Louth Militia (6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles) 1899 in Dundalk  and was with the Louth Militia in Sheffield during 1900. He returned to the 6th Battalion in Dundalk, and was discharged on retirement from the Army on 21st June 1906.

 

Dundalk Herald July 21, 1906

 

“ On Tuesday evening last Colour Sgts R. Moore and D.J.McAuley on their retirement on pension, were each made the recipients of a handsome watch as a small token of regard from their fellow-sergeants of the 6th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. The presentation took place in the sergeants mess ands speeches were made regretting the departure of Sergeants Moore and McAuley, and wishing them the acme of prosperity in civilian life. Subsequently the meeting took the form of a “smoker” and an attractive musical programme was submitted and heartily enjoyed. The singing of “for he’s a jolly good fellow” and “Auld Lang syne” concluded an enjoyable evening.”

 

He was a postman in civil life living with his family at Feede Cross, Dundalk

 

He re-enlisted with the Royal Irish Rifles at Dundalk on 19th Sept. 1914 and was posted the newly established 7th (Service) Battalion. To France on 19th Dec. 1915, as part of the British Expeditionary Force. He served with the 7th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles until 14th November 1917 when that Battalion was amalgamated with the 2nd Battalion R.I.R. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and served with the Labour Corps from 13th Aug. 1918 until he was demobilised on 7th Feb. 1920.

 

After the war he resumed his position as postman living in Edenappa, Co Armagh. He died in 1948 and is buried in Castletown Graveyard, Dundalk. (Source: Great-grandson of Lieut. Daniel J McAuley)

 

McBRIDE, JOHN, Royal Naval Division, Moorland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCABE, Corporal, Irish Guards, From Fane Valley. Wounded September 1916.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Corporal M’Cabe (Fane Valley) of the same company is reported to his family as wounded, and in hospital in France. The Corporal has a brother serving  in the Dublin Fusiliers under, we understand, Lieutenant W A Doran, Chairman of the Louth County Council. (Dundalk Democrat, 7 October 1916)

 

McCABE, B, Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. ‘Took part in several engagements in France, where he sustained wounds.’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

McCABE, Rifleman, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk.

On Monday morning in Belfast, Major M L Ferrar, commanding officer of the depot, presented the Military Medal awarded for bravery in the field to Rifleman J M’Cabe, Royal Irish Rifles, from near Dundalk. Major Ferrar said that on the 5th January Rifleman M’Cabe as one of a bombing party raided the enemy trenches. His comrades were wounded but they gave the Germans more than they got, and McCabe accounted for at least two of them. He was very pleased to be the medium of presenting the medal to the recipient, and he was sure they would all join in wishing him long life to wear it. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

 

McCABE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 May, 1916)

 

McCABE, Corporal, J, 1 Battalion Irish Guards.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

Corporal J M’Cabe, 1st Irish Guards, who was wounded in the advance on the Somme on the 15th September, an explosive bullet having shattered his left leg, is home on invalid leave. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 January 1917)

 

McCABE, Private, J, Military Medal, Royal Irish Rifles. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

McCABE, JAMES,  Irish Guards. From Ballymagoragh, Dunleer. ‘Home Wounded’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

McCABE, Lance-Corporal, JAMES JOSEPH, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

McCABE, JOHN, 140543, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 19 June, 1871, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation, Stoker.  Next-of-kin, Mary McCabe, 5 Tongue Street, Hayward, Lancashire, England, wife. Previous military service, 14 years in 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Currently serving in Militia. Attested 22 July, 1915, Toronto, Canada.

 

McCABE, MICHAEL, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCABE, THOMAS, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McCABE, THOMAS, Jnr. from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McCABE, Private, WILLIAM, Royal Irish Rifles. . Formerly in ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. Joined in November ( 1915).

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Pte Wm M’Cabe, R I Rifles, a young Drogheda man, has been awarded the Military Medal. (Drogheda Independent, 25 August 1917)

 

Drogheda Soldier’s Distinction – For carrying his officer, who was badly wounded, into safety while under heavy fire, Private Wm McCabe, R I R, whose family lives at the Ropewalk, Drogheda, was complimented by the brigadier-General and awarded the Military Medal.

(Drogheda Independent, 8 September 1917)

 

Drogheda soldier wins the Military Meal.

We congratulate Private Wm M’Cabe of the Royal Irish Rifles, whose people reside at the Rope Walk, Drogheda, on having been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the battlefield. This young soldier has seen a good deal of fighting, having fought at the Dardanelles, where he was one of the fortunate few to escape injuries; also in France and Flanders for over a year and nine months. It was as the result of his daring act of bravery on the 21st July last that he won the distinguished honour. During a severe charge by the enemy one of his officers was severely wounded, and Young M’Cabe, seeing his dangerous plight, rescued his from falling into the enemy’s hands, and carried his for over a mile amid a fusillade of bullets, from the zone of fire. Pte M’Cabe has just returned to France after a short visit to his sisters, Mrs Cunningham and Mrs Carolan, in Drogheda. (Drogheda Argus, 8 September 1917)

 

McCAFFREY, Master Gunner, JAMES, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

All ex sailors and ex-servicemen who are in need of advice or assistance should apply to Mr James McCaffrey, Secretary, Dundalk Local Advisory Committee, 5 Market Street. For further particulars see our advertising columns.

(Dundalk Herald, 27 October 1919)

 

Dundalk Ex-Service Men’s Club.

The hut presented by the Government for the use of disabled ex sailors and es-soldiers, and for others who have been demobilised, has now been erected at St Helena, off Castle Road, kindly placed at the disposal of Lord French’s Local Advisory Committee by Mr S Lockington, J P. An influential local committee is endeavouring to furnish the hut, and the Dundalk Comrades of the Great War, who number nearly 200 hope in a very short time to raise sufficient funds to purchase a billiard table and to make this Club quite a comfortable meeting place for the officers and men of the Army and Navy who have now returned to civil life. A great many friends and well wishers of these ex-service men have expressed a desire to help; and Colonel D Guinness, the Chairman of the County Louth Local Advisory Committee, will be glad to receive any furniture, pictures, carpets, lamps, armchairs, tables, &c; and also any newspapers, games and money contributions so that the clubhouse may at once be opened. The Secretary of the Dundalk ex-Service Men’s Club is Mr James McCaffrey (late first-class Master Gunner, Royal Artillery); his address is 5 Market Street, Dundalk.

(Dundalk Herald, 1 November 1919).

 

 McCANN, H. From Platten, Drogheda. Son of Mr H J McCann, Solicitor.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCANN, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Colpe, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCANN, JOSEPH, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Colpe, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCANN, MICHAEL, 2293337, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address ‘L.S.H. (R.C.)’.Born 18 May 1888 Ardee, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Salesman. Next-of-kin, Mrs M A McCann, Mitchellstone (sic), Ardee, Co Louth.  Currently serving in Permanent Active Militia.  Attested on 10 February, 1917, at  Winnipeg, Canada.

 

McCANN, Private, N, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Son of Mr T McCann, Dyer Street, Drogheda. Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCANN, OWEN, 105588, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Earl Grey, Saskatchewan, Canada. Born 10 December, 1889, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Farmer. Next-of-kin, Owen McCann, Carlingford, Co Louth, father.  Attested on 11 December, 1915, at Regina, Saskatchewan,  Canada.

 

McCANN, PATRICK, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Colpe, Drogheda. In Kinhorn Scotland. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCANN, PETER, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Colpe, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(All four McCann’s from Colpe are brothers)

 

McCANN, Private, PETER, Royal Army Service Corps. From Jocelyn Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCARTHY, Private, CHARLES, Connaught Rangers. From 13 Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCARTHY, JOHN. From Castle Road, Dundalk.

Mr Charles M’Carthy, of Castle Road, has had a letter from his soldier son, Jack, who when he wrote was en route to hospital in England after figuring in the casualties. He was hit in the chest and left arm by the explosion of a rifle grenade just in front of him: and his letter tells what a rifle grenade is like – “they are terrible things, made like a long bomb, the size of a porter bottle, fired from a rifle and explode when they alight. With the explosion the shrapnel gets red hot so it burns as well as wounds. All I had on was scorched: shirt, jacket, scapulars and all.” He adds: “The Red Cross doctors and nurses here work wonders. They deserve great credit. “ Jack M’Carthy has lost his left arm, which had to be amputated, so hew is finished as a fighting man,; but he writes quite cheerfully and is apparently very far from being downhearted.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 April, 1916)

 

 McCARTHY, WILLIAM, Royal Navy. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCARTNEY, JAMES, Royal Navy. From Whiterath, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCARTNEY, Private, T, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

McCARTHY,  EDWARD, Royal Irish Rifles. From Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCARTHY, Sergeant, GEORGE, Irish Guards. Worked in Belfast Bank. Military Medal. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

McCARTHY, JOSEPH, 18 Royal Irish Regiment. From Rope Walk, Drogheda. Member of ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers, and of the staff of Drogheda Advertiser.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCARTHY, WILLIAM, Royal Navy. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCLEARY, Sergeant, R, Band, Royal Horse Guards. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCLINTOCK, Midshipman, GEOFFREY, HMS Centurian, Royal Navy. Eldest son of Mr F F McClintock, Rath House, Termonfeckin.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) Sub Lieut (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

McCLINTOCK, MILLICENT, Red Cross

 

McCOMB, WILLIAM ROBERT,  249048, 208 Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 26  Badgerow Ave.  Toronto, Canada. Born 1 August 1890, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Presbyterian. Occupation Book-Keeper. Next-of-kin Eliza McComb, Milestown, Co Louth, mother.  Currently serving two years in Militia. Attested 26 February 1916, Toronto, Canada.

 

McCONNELL, Private, DAVID, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 10 Vincent Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Miss M’Connell of Vincent Avenue, has received official notification that her brother, Private David M’Connell, is in Rouen Hospital suffering from a gunshot wound in the leg. Private M’Connell was known as a notable gymnast and athlete, and some years ago was a well-known figure as a competitor in local athletic and cycling contests. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 May 1915)

 

McCONNELL, Private, WILLIAM, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From10 Vincent Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCONNELL, William, Attached to Royal Irish Rifles. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCONVILLE, Lance-Corporal, BERNARD, 8 Dragoon Guards. From Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

McCORMICK, -, In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCOURT, Sergeant, ALFRED M, Irish Guards. From Park Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Sergt Alfy M’Court, Irish Guards (son of Mr S J M’Court), has been wounded by bomb explosion: and two days later his brother Willie (also a Sergeant) was rather more seriously wounded. The two brothers have fought side by side in all the Guards’ battles in the past 18 months. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 January 1918)

 

Sergeant Alfred M’Court, son of Mr and Mrs Samuel M’Court has been wounded and is now in a base hospital in Boulogne. His brother Sergeant Willie M’Court, who was wounded in the right arm some six months ago, has now been discharged and has returned home. (Dundalk Democrat, 31 August 1918)

 

The Co Louth War Pensions Committee has appointed Sergt. Alfred M’Court (son of Mr S J M’Court, Park St) to the position of Secretary. Sergt. M’Court has had four years war service with the Irish Guards. The Committee advertise for an Assistant Secretary to reside in Drogheda. (Dundalk Democrat, 15 March 1919)

 

McCOURT, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Collon. ‘In training at Cork.’

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

McCOURT, Sergeant, JAMES,  Royal Army Ordnance Corps. From 3 Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCOURT, Private, JOHN, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCOURT, Private, PATRICK, Royal Army Service Corps. From 3 Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCOURT, Seaman, PATRICK, from Nicholas Street, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat attack, 14 October 1918.

Patrick M’Court, a young married man living in Nicholas Street, told our representative that (he) was asleep in the forecastle when, he was awakened by the explosion. He ran on deck and jumped into the port after lifeboat, which was floating when he got in. Moonan and he picked up Fitzgerald, Mulqueen and O’Neill. Fitzgerald’s whereabouts in the water was discovered by his calls for help. When they got Mulqueen into the boat he was so bad that they were afraid he was dying. The submarine came between the two lifeboats but neither of the three men on the U-boat spoke. “I saw the submarine and the Carlingford about the same time,” he continued. “I knew it was the Carlingford and I hailed her and shouted “Carlingford ahoy! Pick up the Dundalk’s crew up.” Somebody shouted back, “Aye, aye”. Later I saw her come round, and I thought she was picking up some of the men out of the small boat, but we saw her no more.”

Before he was picked up Mulqueen’s ribs had been injured, probably by being struck by some of the wreckage. Mulqueen had come up on deck to oil the dynamo, and while engaged in this job the vessel was hit. From the forecastle to the deck two ladders had to be climbed. As M’Court got up one of the ladders it smashed, and he had just crossed the gangway plank when it gave way almost under him. Frank Kierans and he were on the same watch, and both were in bed when the vessel was hit. He called on Kierans to rush for the deck but he fears that he was unable to get up owing to the breaking of the ladder. M’Court when he got into the lifeboat was only half dressed. He was two years on the Dundalk and was a member of the crew when a German U-Boat shelled her almost a tear ago. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

McCOURT, Corporal, WILLIAM G, Irish Guards. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

Corporal William M’Court, 1st Battalion Irish Guards, recently wounded, has again returned to the firing line. The Corporal is a son of Mr S J M’Court of Park Street. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

See McCOURT, Sergeant, ALFRED, Irish Guards.

 

McCOY, Private, JOSEPH, 1 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 17 New Street, Dundalk. Invalided. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCOY, P, Royal Flying Corps. From Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

McCLELLAND, Private, E, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda

            Dear Sir

We have heard of a rumour in circulation in Drogheda to the effect that Messrs A Davis & Co Ltd have discharged certain of their assistants in order to force them to join the Army. Would you kindly give this rumour a flat contradiction, for it is absolutely false, and no member of the staff has ever been approached on the subject. We have volunteered to fight for our country and Empire of our own free will, and Messrs Davis have not alone at very considerable inconvenience to themselves allowed me us to resign our situations, but gave us each a substantial present on leaving and promised to install us in our situations at the conclusion of the war. Yours truly – Privates H M Namara, F Duffy, E M’Clelland, H Sheckleton, all of the 7th Batt. Leinster Regt.

(Drogheda Independent, 29 May 1915)

 

McCLENEGHAN, J. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

McCONNON, ALEXANDER, Royal Irish Rifles. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCORMACK, Private, B, Leinster Regiment. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCORMACK, Private, C, Leinster Regiment. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCORMACK, P, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCORMACK, WILLIAM, South Irish Horse. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCREADY, Chaplain, Reverend M P. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCREANOR, D, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McCRORY, Private, F, Royal Army Service Corps. From Parnell Park, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916). Possible refers to McCRORY, FRANCIS, 3502, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Awarded Victory Medal. From Dundalk.

 

McCRUM, H P, Royal Navy. From MountainView, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McCULLEN, Rifleman, A, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 2  St Peter’s Terrace, Green Lanes,  Drogheda.

Wounded at the Front – Mrs M’Cullen, 2 St Peter’s Terrace, Green Lanes, Drogheda, has received official intimation from the Regimental Records Office that her son, Rflm. A M’Cullen, 2nd Royal Irish Rifles, has been wounded at the front, and is now in Cambridge General Military Hospital, England, where he is progressing favourably. Mrs M’Cullen has two other sons on active service – one in France, and the other in the North Sea. (Drogheda Independent, 27 May 1916)

 

(According to Tim McCullen, grand-nephew of the above, this entry and that for  McQUILLAN, Private, A, Royal Irish Rifles, may refer to the same person, the difference being due to somewhat casual approach in the family to spelling the surname.  Anthony McCullen was born in Drogheda in 1898 and lived to a ripe old age in Drogheda. DH)

 

McCULLEN, PETER JOHN (see McQUILLAN, JOHN, Royal Garrison Artillery). Brother of Anthony McCullen above. Born in Drogheda 1892. Served in France during the war, and remained after the Armistice in Novemnber 1918 to bury the dead. He died in 1957. (Source, Tim McCullen, grand-nephew)

 

McCULLEN, Able Seaman, VINCENT, P/J41676, Royal Navy

Mrs McCullen’s other son, serving “in the North Sea”, was Vincent McCullen, born 1899 in Drogheda. He volunteered for the Royal Navy in 1915, and was serving in the battleship H.M.S. Marlborough at the Battle of Jutland, 31st May 1916. His ship was torpedoed but managed to stay afloat and in action until reaching safe harbour. He remained in the Navy for the rest of the war, and was present at the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet at Scapa Flow in November 1918.

He stayed in the Navy post-war until 1929, marrying an English girl and living in Portsmouth, then moving to Southampton, due to serving in the transatlantic liners on the Southampton-New York run for 3 years. They had six children all born in Hampshire, England.

He then worked for the Southampton Tram Company until August 1939, when, as a naval reservist, he was called back to active service. He served in the destroyer H.M.S. Acasta on Atlantic convoy duties 1939-1940, and then during the Norwegian campaign in April-June 1940.

 

 His ship was sunk in action on 8th June 1940 by the German battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. Acasta and Ardent were the two destroyers escorting the aircraft carrier Glorious home from Norway. The three ships were attacked by the German ships and all were sunk, with the loss of over 1500 lives, but before she was hit, in a brave and daring act, Acasta was able to torpedo Scharnhorst, forcing the enemy to break off their attack, and saving the lives of 25,000 troops coming home in a lightly escorted convoy that might surely have been massacred by the powerful German ships.

Of a ship’s company of 161, only one man from Acasta survived to tell the tale, Leading Seaman Nick Carter.

Vincent McCullen’s death was only officially presumed in October 1941. (Source: Tim McCullen, grandson of Vincent. See also link at http://www.hmsacasta.co.uk/mccullen%20v.html )

 

 McCULLOUGH, J, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From The Marsh, Drogheda. Wounded and a prisoner in Potsdam. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McDANIEL, JOSEPH, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McDERMOTT, P, South Irish Horse. From Shop Street, Drogheda. Son of Mr C McDermott, victualler.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McDONALD, Private, J, Irish Guards. From Dromiskin, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McDONALD, Private, J, Irish Guards.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McDONALD, JOSEPH, 2 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. Invalided. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

McDONNELL, Private, PETER, 88th (sic) Connaught Rangers. From Termonfeckin, Co. Louth.

Private Peter McDonnell, of Termonfeckin, a member of the 88th Connaught Rangers, has returned to his native home from the front wounded. He was in the fighting at Ypres and went through several hard fought fights. His hands were all scarred with bayonet thrusts, which were the least of all his troubles. On the 2nd December he was in the trenches , and the advanced German trenches were but 30 yards distant. Being anxious to know how matters were proceeding he took a look over the brow of the trench. No sooner had he done so than a German sniper in the branches of a tree fired at him. The bullet struck him in front of his cap from which it was directed by the brass badge of his regiment, and glancing off it, passed down his forehead and face, making an ugly wound. Poor Peter fell unconscious, and there he lay from 8 a m until 5 p m the same day, when he was licked up and carried to the field hospital at the rere. He is fast recovering strength and hopes to rejoin his regiment in a few days.

(Dundalk Democrat, 20 January, 1915)

 

McDONNELL, THOMAS, Royal Engineers. From Bull Ring, Drogheda. Formerly in ‘B’ company, Drogheda Volunteers.

Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McELEAVEY, Private, -, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

McELEAVEY, Sergeant, Royal Irish Rifles. From Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McELROY, JOSEPH JAMES, 3083539, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 282 Basset Street, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Born 28 October 1888, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Piper. Next-of-kin, Mary McElroy, 1 Ann Street, Dundalk, Co Louth, mother.  Attested on 16 April 1918 at Montreal, Canada.

 

McELWAINE, Lieutenant, E J D, 76 Punjabis. From Streathearn, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McELWAINE, P A, BL, Inns of Court Office Training Corps. From Streathearn, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McENEANEY, BERNARD, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From John Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McENEANEY, JAMES, Royal Irish Rifles. From John Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McENEANEY, GEORGE. 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McENTEGGART, PATRICK, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Francis Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McEVOY, Petty Officer, ANDREW, HMS Illustrious, Royal Navy. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

McEVOY, J, London Post Office Rifles. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Ptes. J McEvoy and J Callaghan, P O Rifles, who formerly served on the Dundalk P O staff, and who were both extremely popular in town, are prisoners of war. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916)

 

In the lists received from the United States Embassy the following are given as being prisoner of war in Germany – Pte J M’Evoy, of Dundalk who served with the London P O Rifles. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

 

            See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

McEVOY, Private, M, ‘A’ Battery, 10 Division, Royal Field Artillery. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McEVOY, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Hammondstown, Dunleer. ‘At front since the beginning of the war, and still there.’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1915)

 

McEVOY, WILLIAM, South Irish Horse. From West Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McFERRAN,THOMAS,  2378528, Machine Gun Corps, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 575 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Born 19 November 1883, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Presbyterian. Occupation Farm Labourer. Next-of-kin Eileen McFarren, Mount Pleasant, Dundalk, Co Louth, mother. Drafted on 20 November 1917, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

  

McGUIRE, Private, T, Scots Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

McGAWLEY, Private, Royal Munster Fusiliers. From New Road, Ardee.

            Mrs McGawley of New Road Ardee, has received the subjoined letter from her son, a private in the Royal Munster Fusiliers, who is now in hospital in England. It shows clearly the desperate character of the fighting at Suvla in which he took part, and in which his comrade and fellow Louthman of the same regiment, Private Wm. Scully of Drumleck, was killed. Mrs McGawley attributes her son’s escape from the imminent perils of the campaign to the Masses she has had offered for him once every week since he volunteered for the front.

Private McGawley writes - “We had a hot time of it out there, especially the first day of the landing (at the Dardanelles) We lost a lot of our lads. There are only a hundred and ninety of our regiment left. The 15th of August was a terrible day. We lost four hundred men in about seven hours. I didn’t take off my clothes for three weeks. You may guess the state we were in… I got wounded on August 21st. I got my wound saving a young chum from Belfast. We were retreating at the time, and I went back to pick him up when I heard he was shot. He was only a young boy of seventeen years of age. I was helping him in the road when I got hit myself, taking one finger clean off and badly shattering the forefinger. We still kept going until night. We lay down till next morning until we found the stretcher bearers. My young chum was unconscious all night. I kept with him all the time. Nest morning we were under shell fire, but by good luck none of us were hit. The only think we were short of was water, and that was hardly fit to drink. It was awful – the dead bodies, especially when they happened to set fire to them. We were in a bayonet charge first thing in the morning on August 16th. I came through it quite safe only for a slight scratch on the left eye, but it didn’t knock me out. It was an awful sight, and it nearly sent me mad to see all the men falling. We got a few days rest after it, and all the while we were under shell fire while we were resting, especially on the first night. We suffered badly. We lay a day and a night without moving in one spot – eight of us. The bullets were falling like the rain beside us. The Turks killed five: the other three came out safe.”

(Dundalk Democrat, 11 September 1915)

 

 McGEE, JOHN, 2020382, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address, General Delivery, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.   Born 28 May 1894, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Fireman. Next-of-kin, Patrick McGee, St John’s Road (sic.), Dundalk, Ireland , father. Drafted on 16 November 1917 at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

 

McGILL, J. From Carrickrobin, Kilkerley, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McGOWAN, Private, W, 2 Company, Irish Guards, machine gun section.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGOWAN, Sapper, H, Royal Engineers. From Dundalk. Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917) (Dundalk Democrat, 23 September 1916)

 

McGOWAN, Colour-Sergeant, R, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

           

McGOWAN, Corporal, WILLIAM, Royal Engineers. From Dundalk.

Corporal Wm M’Gowan has been promoted Boiler Inspector on the Military Railways in France. Corporal M’Gowan served his apprenticeship at the G N R Locomotive Works, Dundalk, under the direction of his father. On the outbreak of the war he enlisted in the Royal Engineers, and he was sent to France, where he was wounded. ON recovering he next seen (sic) service in Egypt, and from there  was sent to Salonica, where he was still serving until recalled to France by the Chief Mechanical Engineer, Lieut-Colonel G T Glover, R E, of the Military Railways. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 April 1917)

 

McGOUGH, Private, T, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

McGOUGH, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGOUGH, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGOVERN, Sergeant, G, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGOWAN, JAMES, 5 Lancers. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGRANE, Driver, D, 42 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. From 5 Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McGREGOR, ALFRED, South Irish Horse.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGRORY, Acting Corporal, J, from Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 June 1918).

 

McGUINNESS, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Green Lanes, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGUINNESS, THOMAS. Royal Irish Rifles. Tailor from Windmill Lane. Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McGUIRE, EDWARD, 650, C Company,27 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda, Co Louth. Age 25 years and 4 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, Mrs Margaret McGuire, 34  North Strand, Drogheda, Ireland, mother. Enlisted 22 February 1915.  Absent at embarkation at Freemantle 7 April 1915. Struck off strength as deserter, 25 May 1915. 

 

McGUIRE, MATTHEW, 567, B Company, 23 Battalion,  Australian Imperial Force. Born Ardee, Co Louth, age 37 years and three months. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Mrs Mary Ann Traynor, Ardee, Co Louth, sister.  Enlisted 30 June 1915.  Failed to embark Transport ‘Geelong’ . Struck off strength A.I.F.  as deserter., effective from 16 November 1915. Court of enquiry held on 9 December 1915, reported that Pte McGuire was absent from parade at 06.45 parade,  on 16 November 1915 and was still absent. 

 

McGUIRE, R, worked in Dundalk Post Office. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

McGUIRK, Sergeant, J, Connaught Rangers. From Green Lanes, Drogheda. Prisoner of war in Germany. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McHUGH, JOHN, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. ‘In training.’ From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

McINTEE, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McINTYRE, Private, EDWARD, 4 Canadian Regiment. From Omeath.

According to his attestation papers dated 10 September 1914,  Edward McIntyre was born in Ardrossan, Scotland in 1882, and next of kin was his wife Mrs E M McIntyre, who lived at Knockngonen, Omeath, Co. Louth. Occupation was marine engineer, and he had “4 years imperial service” with the Scottish Borderers in South Africa.  He was 32 years and 1 month old at enlistment, was 5 feet and nine inches high, of medium complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair. He had the following tattoos “Lizzie” and highland girl on right forearm, and a naked woman and snake on left forearm.

 

Private Edward M’Intyre, native of Omeath, now serving with the 4th Canadian Regiment, in a letter to his mother says: - “The trenches which the Germans were holding had been taken from the French on the previous night, and we got orders to get them back, and get them back we did. We fought for about thirteen hours when I got wounded, and consider I was very lucky. I got shot through the hip while I was lying flat on the ground getting my breath before the final charge. How we got so fat I cannot tell you. It was raining lead, and shells were bursting all around, and the dead and wounded were lying everywhere. After I got hit, I had the pleasure of seeing what was left of the gallant Canadians leaping over into the German trenches and letting them have the steel instead of lead. I then left the scene with the battle still going on. And it took me an hour and a half to crawl on my hands and knees to the dressing station. I reached it after many a narrow escape, and felt a bit faintish, but glad to know that we (the Canadians) had made a name in history. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 July 1915)

 

            In a letter to the ‘Newry Reporter’, Private Bruce says:-

I trust I am not imposing on valuable space in giving you the following facts about an Omeath man named Edward M’Intyre. I might term it ‘Bravery In rewarded,’ but Mac himself only looked on it as a sense of duty. In the enemy’s great hacking move to reach the coast via Ypres last April, which we Canadians are proud to know was their main stumbling-block. It was after the enemy had made a gap in that part  of the line held by the French native troops that we were thrown into the field to meet the. During our advance the individual of Private M’Intyre was most conspicuous. Time and again he went to assist wounded comrades. On one particular occasion he and another fellow, in going out to the left front, became exposed to a fierce machine-gun and rifle fire. After carrying him to the rear M’Intyre again rejoined his company. We were strongly reinforced late in the afternoon by British regiments, and it was after advancing to within point-blank range of the enemy position Mac got badly wounded. Although several volunteered to carry him to the rear (he was not able to walk), after having got his wounds dressed, he managed to crawl back to the dressing station alone, and we found out afterwards he had even stopped to attend wounded men.. Our casualties were heavy. Our colonel and adjutant went down leading the advance, and when I tell you that all our company officers were put out of action that day you will understand why I might term this as hard luck on M’Intyre, for I know that had one of our own company officers been spared, Mac would have been awarded highest honours. After recovering from his wounds Mac rejoined us some two months later, and now after months of strenuous warfare has fallen victim to that which we most dread out here – rheumatics.’

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 January 1916)

 

McKEE, ALEXANDER MILLER, 919, 25 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Age 22 years and 9 months, born Castlebellingham, Co Louth.  Next-of-kin, Mrs A A McKee, Darver, Castlebellingham, Co Louth, mother. Church of England.  Occupation Stockman. Attested 8  January 1915. Landed Alexandria, Egypt, 9 January 1916. Landed Marseilles, France 19 March 1916. Gunshot wound neck, 11 November 1916. To England 22 November 1916. Discharged in London, 28 June 1917, being permanently unfit for war service.  Intended place of residence 50 University Avenue, Belfast. Ireland. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. Letter  dated 28 March 1967 from Pte McKee, address 14 Nicholson Street,  Burwood, New South Wales, Australia, requesting Gallipoli badge and medallion.

 

McKEE, Sergeant, W A, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKEEVER, Private, B, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Bayview Terrace, Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKEEVER, BERNARD, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKEEVER, JOHN. Missing (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MCKEEVER, JOSEPH, Australian Imperial Force. Born Ardee, Co Louth, age 44 years. Occupation Tutor. Next-of-kin, Patrick McKeever, Board of Agriculture, Dublin, brother. Address in Australia, 211 Kent Street, Sydney, New South Wales. Previous military experience, one year Fusiliers. Enlisted 2 May 1918. Deemed unfit for military service, 6 May 1918.

 

McKEEVER, LAURENCE, Royal Engineers. From Freeschool Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McKEEVER, Private, M, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916)

 

McKEEVER, MICHAEL, Irish Guards. From Freeschool Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McKEEVER, Private, T, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 May, 1916)

 

McKEEVER, THOMAS, from Annagassan. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McKELVIE, ROBERT, Royal Navy, HMS Exmouth. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

McKELVEY, ALEXANDER, Royal Navy, HMS Carnarvon. .From Marsh Road, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

  

McKENNA, Private, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McKENNA, Private, D, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported missing.

(Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

McKENNA, Sergeant, GEORGE. 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKENNA, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

McKENNA, JOE, with the RLF (sic). From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

McKENNA, JOSEPH, Leinster Regiment. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McKENNA, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McKENNA,  MAXWELL, from Kilsaran. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

McKENNA, P. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual  1916)

 

McKENNA, Private, P, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Knockbridge, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKENNA, Private, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

McKENNA, PATRICK JOSEPH, 28793, 4 Division Ammunition Column, Australian Imperial Force.  Born St Peter’s, Drogheda, Co Louth. Age 22 years and 11 months. Roman Catholic.  Occupation, Labourer. Next-of-kin, Thomas McKenna, 62 Chord Road, Drogheda, Co Louth, father. Mother’s name, Mary-Anne McKenna struck out. Enlisted 28 March 1916. At sea, 13 October 1916 charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order, awarded 120 hours detention.  Arrived in England 2 November 1916. April 9, 1917, charged with being dirty on guard mounting parade, drunk when warned for guard. Awarded 14 days detention.  In France 11 April 1917. July 19, 1917, absent from parade, awarded 14 days Field Punishmenr No.2.  To hospital sick, France  various times from August 1917. Absent without leave 26 September 1917 to 3 October 1917. Awarded 28 days Field Punishment No.1. Forfeit 36 days pay.  Admitted to hospital England 3 January 1918. Lymphangitis in the leg. Absent without leave 26 April 1918 to 27 April 1918. Forfeit 2 days pay. Returned to Australia 25 December 1918. Discharged 5 June 1919. Awarded British War Medal and Victory Medal.

1901 Census, Patrick Joseph McKenna age 5, lived at 126 Chord Road, Drogheda, father Thomas age 59, occupation shop assistant. Mother, Mary Anne age46, born Co Tipperary. Three siblings, William age 18, occupation Shop Assistant, John F age 13, occupation scholar, and Kathleen, age 11, occupation scholar. All children born Co Louth.

1911 Census: Patrick J McKenna, age 15 lived at no 12 Chord Road, Drogheda. Father Thomas age 69, born Co Louth, occupation Shopman, Corn Meal and Flour. Mother Mary Anne, born King’s County, age 57, sister Elizabeth C age 21, born Co Louth.

 

McKENNA, Rifleman, W, Royal Irish Rifles. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKEOWN, BERNARD, Leinster Regiment. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916).

 

McKEOWN, HARRY, 919105, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 40 Ontario Street, West Montreal. Born 26 April 1891, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Clerk.  Next-of-kin, P McKeown, Little Mills, Dundalk, Co Louth, brother. Attested on 20 March, 1916 at Montreal, Canada.

 

McKEOWN, J, Leinster Regiment. From Mell, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

            Possibly 5899 John McKeown, born Sandpit, Drogheda. Enlisted in Leinster Regiment 1899. Served in the Boer War, and in France from September 1914 to September 1918. Discharged 1920. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

Father John McKeown Garristown? Co Louth

Mother Mary McKeown

Brother Thomas McKeown Sanpit.

 

McKEOWN, Private, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

McKEOWN, PATRICK

            Man dies from Burns

            Ex-Soldier’s sad fate.

Patrick M’Keown, a Dundalk ex-Serviceman, died in the Louth Infirmary on Thursday morning, following burns accidentally received the previous night in his house in James’s Street, Dundalk. MacKeown, who was aged about 40, suffered from shell-shock and was permanently disabled. He was in bed when his wife left the house on an errand. When she returned she found him on the kitchen floor, in his nightshirt, badly burned. He was removed to the Louth Infirmary where he died. It is believed that the man got from bed either to attend the fore or to light a cigarette and that his night shirt was caught in the flames.

(Dundalk Democrat, 13 November 1937).

 

McKEOWN, P. From Little Mills, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McKeown, Patrick. Patrick McKeown was born and baptised at Rinkinstown, Walshestown, Clogherhead on 22nd May 1885 (parochial register). Per family tree records (with Declan Quaile, Blackrock) he joined the Inniskilling Fusiliars and fought on the Western Front during the First World War.

Before and after the War he lived at various locations in and around Dundalk, including Little Mills. His final address was at Hill St. Bridge, in the small cottage below the bridge, on the left as you enter Dundalk. He worked as a timekeeper in the GNR in Dundalk.

He died in 1954 and was buried in St Patrick’s Cemetery, Dundalk. (Source: Declan Quaile)

Possibly 26118 Private Patrick McKeown WO 372/13/27733

 

McLOUGHLIN, J, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McLOUGHLIN, J. From Upper Merches, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McLOUGHLIN (recorded as M’Gloughlin), Colour-Sergeant, JAMES, Royal Irish Rifles. From 53 Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McMAHON, GEORGE, Irish Guards. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McMAHON, Private, OWEN, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers.

            Irish Priest at the Front

Christmas Mass in a barn

In the course of a letter from the front to his father, Mr Patrick M’Mahon, Castletown Road, Dundalk, Private Owen M’Mahon, of the 1st Battalion R I F, says: “We have an Irish priest with our regiment here and a brave man he is. Three weeks ago we were going up one night with rations to our firing-line trenches when we met the priest who had been praying over the graves of some of the men who had fallen. We were wet to the skin and he must have been the same. We did not know who he was until he saluted us. Immediately afterwards there came a swarm of bullets across the road and we had to take shelter in an old house. We did not know whether the priest had been struck or not, but three days afterwards we were gad to meet him again,. It was Christmas morning and we were at Mass in an old barn – about 40 of us. The priest was in tears and we did not know the cause. When Mass was over he told us he was not crying with sorrow but with joy to see so many of us at Mass that Christmas morning in the barn – so far from home and from our friends in Ireland. We were quite happy. Father Ryan is the name of the priest.” (Dundalk Democrat, 13 February 1915)

 

McMAHON, Private, PETER J, 2 Battalion Scots Guards. From Clanagha, Crossmaglen, Co. Armagh. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

McMANUS, JACK, Royal Field Artillery. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

McNALLY, Private, E, Irish Guards. From Ardee. Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916)

 

McNAMARA, Private, H, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda

            Dear Sir

We have heard of a rumour in circulation in Drogheda to the effect that Messrs A Davis & Co Ltd have discharged certain of their assistants in order to force them to join the Army. Would you kindly give this rumour a flat contradiction, for it is absolutely false, and no member of the staff has ever been approached on the subject. We have volunteered to fight for our country and Empire of our own free will, and Messrs Davis have not alone at very considerable inconvenience to themselves allowed me us to resign our situations, but gave us each a substantial present on leaving and promised to install us in our situations at the conclusion of the war. Yours truly – Privates H M Namara, F Duffy, E M’Clelland, H Sheckleton, all of the 7th Batt. Leinster Regt.

(Drogheda Independent, 29 May 1915)

 

McNAMEE, Stoker, ALOYSIUS, Royal Navy. From Dungooley, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

McNAIR, CHARLES, 104441, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth, 12 May 1897 (handwritten note on attestation paper that birth certificate states actual date of birth 13 May 1897). Religious affiliation Presbyterian.. Occupation Farmer. Next-of-kin, Andrew T McNair, 2 Homelea, Serpentine Avenue, Ballsbridge, Dublin, father. Attested on 24 August, 1915, at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

McNAIR, Private, ROBERT HENRY, 204090, 13 Battalion Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment) (CWGC) Canadian Highlanders (IMR), Cameron Highlanders (TA 1919), brother of the above.  Enlisted December 1915. Killed in action, Monday 2 September 1918. Age 22.

 

McPARLAND, Private, John. From Dundalk.

Private Jack McParland, another Dundalk man, who volunteered shortly after the outbreak of war, was wounded on April 30 (1915). In a letter received by his parents on Tuesday last he states that he is now all right and is stationed in a quiet little village in France. (Dundalk Democrat, 29 May 1915)

 

McPHILLIPS, Private, -, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McQUAILE, CHRISTOPHER, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Duleek Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

McQUILLAN, Private, A, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

See entry for McCULLEN, Rifleman, A, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

           

McQUILLAN, JOHN, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Green Lanes, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (see entry for McCULLEN, PETER JOHN. Tim McCullen thinks that this may refer to his granduncle Peter John McCullen)

 

McQUILLAN, Private, JOHN, 11370, Royal Engineers. From Green Lanes Drogheda. Enlisted 1915 age 42. Served in France from 1915 to 1917. Demobilised 1917. Full service record available from Ancestry co uk.

 

McVEIGH, PETER, Royal Irish Rifles. From Green Hills Drogheda. Formerly in ‘A’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MACKAY, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MACKAY, RICHARD B, Royal Irish Rifles. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MACKEN, LAURENCE, Royal Navy. From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MACKEY, Driver, V B, Royal Field Artillery. From Market Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MACKEY, Captain, C J, Leinster Regiment, and F C (sic) Royal Flying Corps. Military Cross. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MADDEN, PETER, from Annagassan. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

MAHOOD, D O, Royal Irish Rifles. From Clermont, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MAGOWAN, W, Royal Engineers. From Ardee Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MAGILL, Trooper, Samuel, South Irish Horse. From Collon. ‘In training at Limerick’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916). In Bedford England (15 January 1916). On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

MAGILL, Trooper, W J, South Irish Horse. From Collon. ‘In training at Limerick’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916). In Bedford England. (15 January 1916)

 

MAGINN, EDWARD, Royal Army Service Corps. From West Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAGUIRE, JAMES, Leinster Regiment. From George’s Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAGUIRE, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAGUIRE, Private, PATRICK, 8006, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

From Patrick Street, Drogheda. Enlisted in 1905.  Prisoner of war 1915. Demobilised 1919. Full service file available from Ancestry co uk.

 

MAGUIRE, RICHARD, Royal Engineers. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

MAGUIRE, THOMAS, lived at 82 George’s Street, Drogheda, in a house owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

MAHER, Drummer, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MALCOLM, Lieutenant, JOHN W, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Stapleton Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MALLEY, Corporal, H, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MANNING, EDWARD, Royal Irish Rifles. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARLAY, Private, P, Connaught Rangers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

MARMION, JOHN, 55664, Australian Flying Corps, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda, age 29 years and 6 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation sailor. Enlisted 18 October 1916. Deserted, last known address, Telegraph Hotel, Law Courts Place, Melbourne. Warrant issued 27 June 1917. Proceedings of court of enquiry dated 16 July 1918 found that Pte Marmion  ‘absented himself from the 18th June 1918 to 16th July 1918, a period of 29 days, and is still so absent.’ And also that Pte Marmion,  ‘be struck off the strength as a deserter.’

 

MARRY, DENIS, 5 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Green Lanes, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private, -, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private, FRANCIS, Royal Irish Rifles. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Pte Francis Martin, RIR of Dundalk, enlisted early in the war and served in the 16th Irish Division, being through most of the heavy fighting. He was awarded the Military Medal for leading his platoon at Guinchy when his superiors down to the corporal were knocked out. Pte Martin took the remnants of the platoon back from a hopeless position, and was home in Dundalk during the week on special furlough granted in connection with this exploit, ordinary leave being stopped for the moment in his division. (Dundalk Democrat, 11 November 1916)

 

MARTIN, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private, J. Royal Irish Rifles. From Louth. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

 

MARTIN, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Collon. ‘In training in England. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private, JAMES, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Collon. ‘In training at Cork’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private JOHN, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Collon. ‘In training at Cork’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

MARTIN, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARTIN, P, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Employee of L and Y Railway Co. Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MARTIN, Private, T, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

MATHEWS, Sergeant, GEORGE, 5 Depot Royal Field Artillery. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MATHEWS, JAMES STANLEY, son of the late Mr Patrick Mathews, Mounthanover, Drogheda. Recently married. Volunteered and has secured a Commission in a Cavalry Regiment. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MATHEWS, Lieutenant, DUFF, also a son of of the late Mr Mathews, Mounthanover, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MATTERS, JACK, Royal Irish Fusiliers. ‘In Training.’ Brother of  Joe Matters. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

MATTERS, Sergeant, JOE, Connaught Rangers. ‘In France. Also served in India’. From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

MATTHEWS, -, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MATTHEWS, Private, JAMES, London Post Office Rifles. From Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Telegraphist in GPO (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

We must congratulate Mr Jas Mathews, telegraphist in the Dundalk Post Office, who volunteered for the Colours in the early days of the war. We call it safe; but Mr Mathews, who was wounded on the right knee, chest and chin, in action in France on the 25th of January last, and has since been in hospital is permanently disabled. He is still fit, however, to take on his old duties, to which he has been restored. His brother is the very courteous and efficient steward of the SS Dundalk.(Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916) (Peter Mathews, age 46,  steward on the SS Dundalk was drowned when that ship was torpedoed on 14 October 1918 on a voyage from Liverpool to Dundalk. DH)

 

            See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

MATTHEWS, Gunner, JOHN, Ammunition Column, 35 Battery, 25 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. From Sheephouse, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAXWELL, HUGH, Royal Irish Rifles. At the front.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAXWELL, P, Royal Irish Rifles. Stationed in Dublin.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAY, JACK, 7 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Son of Mr Robert May, Fair Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MAYNE, Lieutenant, M S, Royal Engineers. From Faughart Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MEAD, ERNEST ALBERT, Royal Field Artillery in Chester. Son of Mr E J Mead late of Hughfield House, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MEADE, JACK, 15147, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, Born 17 March, 1892, Castlebellingham, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Butcher. Next-of –kin, Mrs M. Meade, Co Louth, mother. Attested on 24 September 1914, at Valcartier, Quebec, Canada.

 

MEADE, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

MEDLEY, Private, JOHN, ‘C’ Squadron, 8 Hussars.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MEEHAN, Private, FRANK, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MEEHAN, Private, THOMAS, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MEGAN, HENRY, 3081393, 1 Depot Battalion, 1 Quebec Regiment, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 1935 Cartier Street, Montreal, Canada. Born Drogheda Ireland. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Compositor. Next-of-kin Mrs Sarah Megan, 2 St Mary’s Cottages, Drogheda, Co Louth, mother.  Drafted on 8 January 1918, at Montreal, Canada.

 

MELVILLE, Private, JOHN R, Royal Army Medical Corps, 48 Field Ambulance. From The Square, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MELVILLE, Bombardier, JAMES, 3/1 City of Edinburgh Royal Garrison Artillery. From The Square, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Following is an extract from a cheerful and interesting letter received by us from Bdr. James Melville, son of Mr J D Melville, Dundalk. It will specially interest his old comrades in Dundalk.

‘It is wonderful the number of Dundalk men that one comes across while moving about this war-torn country. I had the good fortune to meet four Dundalk boys just over a month ago, one of whom was my own brother. They are with the 18th Field Ambulance, and are all known to you, I am sure – Mr Carson’s son and Mr Callan’s son, of Park Street. It is a real pleasure to meet somebody from the old town. Unfortunately I am now with the Canadian Division and do not get the same chance of meeting old pals. We are at present in the first line trenches with trench mortars, the last word in destruction, work which is very dangerous and very important. One think the boys out here never lose, and that is our good spirits. We are always cheery on it and looking forward to the day when we shall have earned our rest. At present I am under special training for a Commission in the Regular Army, having joined the ranks of the Lowland (City of Edinburgh) R G A shortly after the war broke out. (Dundalk Democrat, 2 December 19016)

 

MILEY, Private, -, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

MILLAR, JOHN MICHAEL, 2043, 2 Field Ambulance Reinforcements, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth.  Age 18 years and six months. Occupation Farming. Congregationalist.  Next-of-kin, David Miller, 23 Egmount Street, Cheetham Hill, Manchester, England, father. Enlisted 30 September 1914.  Served in Gallipoli from August 1915 and in Mudros from November 1915. To France 9 October 1916. October 9, 1916, charged with conduct  to the prejudice of good order and military discipline in that he did make a false statement to an officer. Awarded 7 days Field Punishment no 2. February 27, 1917, charged with drunkenness,  in that he being under the influence of liquor was unable to carry out his duties as a stretcher bearer on 9 February 1917. Awarded 14 days Field Punishment no 2, at 1st Anzac Punishment Compound.  Forfeit 2 days pay. Absent without leave 26 January 1918. Forfeit 2 days pay. Note of 7 days Field Punishment No 2 awarded 2 September 1918, no reason stated. Returned to Australia 2 December 1918. Discharged 31 January 1919. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

MILLS, JASON. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MILNE, Private, T, Leinster Regiment. From Windmill Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MINES, THOMAS, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MINTO, Corporal, GEORGE, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, From 17 Williamson’s Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MOHAN, JOSEPH P, 866, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 1888, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Male Nurse. Next-of-kin, Mary Mohan, 162 Leeson Street, Belfast, mother. Previous military experience, three years one month with 2 Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. Attested on 18 September 1914, place indecipherable.

 

MOHAN, PETER, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Williamson’s Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MOLLOY, JOSEPH GORDON, 2359, 4/41 Battery, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk Co Louth. Age 36 years and 6 months. Occupation Marine Fireman. Next-of-kin, Mrs Annie Neville, Church Lane, Dundalk, sister. Church of England. Enlisted 11 February 1916. Disembarked in England 10 January 1917. Sent home to Australia 27 August 1917, due to over-age and rheumatism, arrived in Australia 24 October 1917. Discharged 29 November 1917. Two letters of enquiry in 1920, following one in 1919, from his sister Annie Neville of Church Lane,  Dundalk, enquiring as to his whereabouts.  The last known address in 1921 was c/o F Armstrong, Logan Lea, Queensland . (Mrs Neville,  Church Lane, Dundalk, lost a son, 1662 Rifleman James Neville, 1 battalion Royal Irish Rifles, on 9 May 1915.) Awarded British War Medal.

 

MONAGHAN, Private, JOHN, Royal Garrison Artillery. Formerly of The Dale, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MONAGHAN, Private, JOHN, 2 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Brother of PATRICK MONAGHAN. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MONAGHAN, Lance-Corporal, PATRICK, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 28 Mary Street, Drogheda. See also JOHN MONAGHAN (above).

 

MONAGHAN, THOMAS, Royal ?, (entry incomplete). From John Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MONEYPENNY, CHARLES, HMS Caesar, Royal Navy. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MONK,  Lance-Corporal, JOHN T, Royal Irish Rifles. Son of Mr T Monk, postman, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported ‘Private’ wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916) also reported wounded and serving in the Royal Irish Fusiliers (Dundalk Democrat, 9 September, 1916), also wounded and presently in hospital in England. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MONK, Sergeant, WILLIAM, Inniskilling Fusiliers. Postman from Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers. From Long Avenue, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

The following members of the Dundalk Post Office indoor staff have been demobilised and resumed duty: - Messrs G J Montgomery, J J Smith, and D Barrett.

Messrs W Stewart, overseer and R McGuire are on demobilised leave prior to resuming duty next month.

Of the indoor staff, Messrs J Callaghan, G James, McEntaggert, McEvoy and McLaughlin; also Mr J Mullen, Inspector of Messengers, have resumed duty.

Messrs Callaghan and McEvoy were prisoners of war in Germany for two years and eight months. Despite the hardships they have gone through all look remarkably fit and well.

Mr E Q Moyter, at present home on furlough, is to join the army of occupation in Germany. Of the other members of the staff who joined up Mr J Matthews, who was severely wounded and rendered unfit for further army service resumed duty some time ago. Mr T Craughwell who unfortunately lost a leg, is still undergoing hospital treatment. Of those who paid the supreme sacrifice were – Messrs J McShane, B Carolan and J Green.

Among those still waiting to be “demobilised” are Messrs M Reilly, WE J Linnane, J J Quigley, J Connell and W Roden, M C.

We think there are few post offices or in fact offices of any description, who can boast a longer Roll of Honour, pro rata, than Dundalk.

(Dundalk Herald, 29 March 1919)

 

MOONAN,  JAMES, 244 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 205 West Street, New York, USA. Born 6 May 1886, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England, Occupation Sailor. Next-of-kin, Mollie Moonan, 33 Beatrice Street, Stanley Road, Bootle. Liverpool. England, wife.  Previous military experience, ten years in Naval Reserve. Attested on 3 November 1916, at Montreal, Canada.

 

MOONAN, Private, T, Leinster Regiment. From John Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOONAN, Seaman, PATRICK, from Drogheda. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat attack, 14 October 1918.

Three of the five men who were landed in Douglas on Tuesday – Patrick Moonan, Patrick McCourt and Hugh O’Neill – arrived home on Sunday last and were met at the station by many relatives and friend. All had quite recovered from the effects of the terrible occurrence …

Patrick Moonan, who is a native of Drogheda, and lives in Quay Street with his wife and family, told the story of the disaster and the plight of the men in the lifeboat afterwards, when he was interviewed by a “Democrat” representative. He had been sailing on the Dundalk for 11 months, and on the night of the 14th October had been relieved at the wheel at 10.30. He was in the forecastle having a cup of tea when the torpedo hit the ship and he at once ran on deck and made for the port after lifeboat. Into the same boat there came another sailor – Patrick M’Court. These were the only two in the boat when she touched water. In the water they picked up Mulqueen, Fitzgerald and O’Neill. They rowed for some time but saw no other survivor. While so engaged they saw the submarine, and Mulqueen saw three men on it – two standing by the gun and one by the conning tower. The latter turned his head away from them The submarine submerged after the Dundalk had gone down – having only remained afloat for about 3½ minutes. “Almost at the same time that we saw the submarine,” continued Moonan, “the Carlingford came up.  We hailed her and told her that we were some of the Dundalk’s crowd. We were answered – I couldn’t say by whom. The Carlingford put her helm hard to starboard after going a distance, but we didn’t see her any more. We got our boat away and ran before the wind until daylight in a short choppy sea. When daylight cane we made a sail out of an oar. We were picked up about 3.30 about 25 miles from Liverpool.

The five men had thus been in the open boat for almost 17 hours. Mulqueen and Fitzgerald were suffering badly and could give little help. Their boat had been damaged and made a good deal of water, necessitation continuous baling. On the ss “Douglas”  and by the people and harbour authorities of Douglas the men were treated extremely well. They vie with one another in paying tribute to the hospitality and kindness shown them.

Moonan, who served his time on the “Countess of Derby” a schooner owned by the late Captain M’Cabe of Dundalk, has had many extraordinary experiences during the 26 years he has spent at sea. He has sailed round the world many a time. When the famous German raider “Moewe” was acting as the highwayman of the ocean, Moonan was one of the crew of the Pacific boat , the “Philoineco” which was captured by the Moewe.  He was one of the prisoners taken and was kept aboard the raider for a month and twenty-seven days. There were hundreds of  other sailors on the raider, and the captain of the Moewe decided to send them off on a prize vessel, the “Westburn” which was seized.  On board the “Westburn” were put 570 sailors with a prize crew of Germans, every man of whom were armed to the teeth. They were provided with seven says’ food, and the intention was to land them on St Nicholas’ Island, which is uninhabited. The neutral sailors of the company objected to this, and it was then agreed to send them to Tenerife. This journey took fifteen days, and long before its conclusion the rations had been exhausted. After landing them the Germans blew up the vessel. Moonan with others, was taken to London.

In 1904 Moonan was one of the crew of a small vessel – the Mary Anne – which capsized three miles off Clogherhead. His father-in-law was drowned, but he and six others kept afloat on three oars for an hour and a half until they were picked up.

When he had related his experiences Moonan said “Don’t forget to say a good word for Captain Kelly, of the Douglas. He’s a gentleman, and treated everyone of us as in the best.” (Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

MOONAN, RICHARD PATRICK, 769145, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 172 South Simcoe Street, Toronto, Canada. Born 17 March 1886, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation, Waiter. Next-of-kin, Marcella Moonan, Coolagh Lodge, Drogheda, Co Louth, mother. Attested on 27 December 1915, at Toronto, Canada.

 

MOONEY, Private, -, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOONEY, MICHAEL, Irish Guards. From Duleek Street, Drogheda. Formerly commander of ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE, C. From Mary Street South, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MOORE, Sister. From Faughart Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MOORE, Corporal, HUGH V, 1/6 Black Watch. From Faughart Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MOORE, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mell, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE, MICHAEL, Royal Engineers. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mell, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE, R S, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Employee of the L and Y Railway Co. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mell, Drogheda. Formerly in ‘D’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOORE-BOYLE. M T, of Prospect House, Dundalk.

We learn from Mr. M T Moore-Boyle, J P, of Prospect House, has volunteered for service in the Irish Division, now being formed for active service.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914).

 

MOOREHEAD, R, Royal Field Artillery. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MORAN, Driver, JAMES, Royal Field Artillery. From Market Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MORGAN, Sergeant, CHARLES, 26 Battery Royal Field Artillery. From Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MORGAN, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. At present in France.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MORGAN, JOHN, from Milestown. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

MORGAN, Private, H, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From 26 Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Information has been received that Private Herbert Morgan, second son of the late Sergeant-Major Morgan, Broughton Street, has been wounded and is at present in hospital in Boulogne. Private Morgan served with the Irish Guards on the Western Front. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 October 1915)

           

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

 

MORGAN, Private, H, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

 MORGAN, M J. From Dunleer.

The war has scattered a number of our Louth boys in out-of-the-way places. Every now and then we have letters from Salonika, from Egypt, from Baghdad and from Palestine. There are local lads in all these places. This week we have a card from Jerusalem. The writer is M J Morgan, of Dunleer, well known a few years back as secretary of the famous Dunleer Harriers, and no bad man across country himself. He says: “It was a blessing from God to drive the Turks from the Holy Land. Jerusalem and all the sacred places in the neighbourhood are splendidly kept by our boys.” We met a sergeant of the Inniskillings the other day, a grizzled man, erect as a ramrod, clean as a new pin. He had come straight fro Jerusalem, travelling 10 days without resting full 24 hours anywhere. He had served in India, in South Africa, for over a year in France, was at the Suvla Bay landing, spent months in the trenches before Salonika, and finally marched most of the way from Cairo to Jerusalem. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 August 1918)

 

MORGAN, WILLIAM, Royal Irish Rifles. At the front.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MORGAN, WILLIAM, Royal Irish Rifles. From Francis Street, Drogheda. At present wounded home. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MORTON, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

MORRIS, Lance-Corporal, A, Leinster Regiment. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOSS, C. Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MOURITY (sic) probably MOURITZ FRANCIS WR, Royal Dublin Fusiliers

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MOTYR (MOYTER), E, Royal Engineers (Telegraphist). From Mountain View, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

MOYNAGH, Second- Lieutenant, STEPHEN H, R O (sic). From Roden Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Not a few fine young men have left Dundalk during the last month or so to join the Irish Guards or other regiments for service during the war. Many of these young men are of a class well described as “comfortable”, and they joined the army at this crises because they believed it a duty upon them to bear a hand in checking the German menace. They went without any drum-beating or flag waving, but not without abundant good wishes for their safety through the imminent perils of war. When our well-known public men volunteer for active service they cannot slip away unnoticed. This week Louth has sent away three such men – Sir Vere Foster, Chairman of the Ardee Board of Guardians, who has gone for training with the Norfolk Yeomanry; Mr W A Doran Chairman of the Louth County Council, who has enlisted in the new Irish Brigade, and Mr S H Moynagh, solicitor, Vice-chairman of the urban Council, who has joined the Rugby battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers. This trio represents a very notable contribution to the new army. We think everybody – even the few who pretend they are Pro-German (but are in their secret hearts nothing of the kind) – will compliment these recruits on their pluck: especially in having “listed” in the rank and file instead of seeking the softer billets to which their position and education would entitle them. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 November 1914)

           

Mr Moynagh attended the meeting of the Urban Council on Tuesday night in uniform. We understand that his legal business will be carried on as usual and, by virtue of special concessions, under his personal supervision. Many lawyers, of both branches of the profession, are now in military service: and their professional brethren are seeing to it that their professional business does not suffer. We are sure it will be so in Mr Moynagh’s case, and that the very big sacrifice of case and liberty which he makes in joining the army at this crises will not involve him in any loss of practice. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 November 1914).

 

Another of our most notable recruits, Mr S H Moynagh, solicitor, who also enlisted as a private (in the Dublin Fusiliers), has been, we regret to hear, rejected as physically incapable of enduring the hardships of the winter campaign in which his battalion is very shortly to engage. Nobody will feel this more acutely that Mr Moynagh himself. He also offered all that a man has, of ease and comfort. It is his misfortune that the sever illness from which he suffered some four or five years ago left traces in his constitution that, in the opinion of the medical examiner, would probably lead to fatal results if he were subjected to the hardships of life in the trenches. Doubtless however amongst the many young men we have in Dundalk, physically fit and demonstratively loyal, there will be many forthcoming to take his place. (Dundalk Democrat, 29 November 1914)

 

It is rumoured in town that Mr S H Moynagh has received a commission as recruiting officer in connection with the Dundalk station, which since the departure  of Major Cliff, has been in charge of Lieutenant Thornhill, Castlebellingham. As our readers know, Mr Moynagh very pluckily volunteered for active service as a private in the Dublin Fusiliers – that was before the formation of the new Irish Division – but after a few weeks preliminary training he developed an illness which was thought by the regimental doctor a bar to his employment on active service. It  is a rather notable fact that, while we hear so many people crying out about the alleged “slackness” of recruiting, an enormous percentage of those who have offered themselves for service since the outbreak of the war have been rejected  on the ground of what we would imagine to be quite trifling physical defects. One of the most active and “fit” young men in Dundalk Mr Willie Gray, was sent down from the Life Guards, because he had traces of an old strain in his knee – a defect that does not bar him from doing a 100-mile non-stop motor cycle run any day in the week his business calls for it. Similarly men were sent down because they were half-an-inch too short, or half-an-inch too narrow in the chest, because they lacked a few teeth or were a bit short-sighted, because they had flat feet or a tendency to varicose veins, or something else that would not prevent them from shooting straight or doing their bit in a bayonet charge. (Dundalk Democrat, 13 February, 1915)

 

Congratulations to Lieut. Stephen H Moynagh, on receiving his commission in the Dublin Fusiliers – the regiment which he pluckily joined as a private when first the call for volunteers was issued, and in which he served in that humble capacity until his health broke down temporarily.  It is not every man in his position who has had the courage to give up the comforts of home for the barrack room. No man therefore, of the thousands who have received commissions deserved it better. He is, we understand, to be placed in charge of recruiting in Co Down with headquarters at Newry. He has already done good service in thi9s respect at Dundalk as understudy to Lieut. Thornhill. His first big adventure in his new sphere of duty will be the War Demonstration in Warrenpoint on Wednesday evening next at which the Lord Lieutenant and many notabilities will be present. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 June 1915)

 

MULHOLLAND Private, PATRICK, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 15 St Brigid’s Terrace, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

             

MULHOLLAND, Private, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Pte Patk Mulholland, RIR, son of Mr Thomas Mulholland, of Happy Valley, has been home invalided and has now rejoined regimental headquarters. He was in the advanced trenches when a heavy shell (known to the Tommies as a Jack Johnston) came over, smashed in the parapet and buried Mulholland and a number of his comrades. He was dug out and found to be suffering from pretty sever injuries in the back and side, and after a stay in hospital in Leeds he was granted home leave. His escape is Providential, as a number of his comrades were killed. Pte Mulholland is a fine young soldier, and was promoted to corporal’s rank, but like many others in like circumstances, he preferred to serve as a private. (Dundalk Democrat, 11 November 1916)

 

MULQUEEN, Second Engineer, J, from Drogheda. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

See McCOURT, Seaman, PATRICK

 

MULLEN, MICHAEL, 1934, Australian Imperial Force. Born Ardee, Co Louth, age 36 years and four months. Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Miss E Mullen, Rosehill, Ardee, Co Louth, sister. Enlisted 5 February 1916. In England 16 August 1916. Charged with overstaying leave 5 September 1916, awarded  3 days confined to camp and forfeit 1 days pay. Absent without leave 20 October  1916 to 4 November 1916. Awarded 6 days Field Punishment No 2, forfeited 21 days pay.  In France 28 November 1916. December 6, 1916 charged with losing one emergency ration, admonished and to pay cost of ration.   Gunshot wound right leg, 4 October 1917. To hospital in France. Absent without leave 2 December 1917 to 3 December 1917. Awarded 12 days Field Punishment No 1 and forfeited 14 days pay. Rejoined unit  in France 27 December 1917. To England on leave, 12 January 1918. To hospital, sick, 30 January 1918. To Australia 10 March 1918. Discharged  13 June 1918. Awarded Victory Medal and British War Medal. Died 9 February 1958.

 

MULLIGAN, JAMES

            Dundalk ex-soldier “arrested” by Sinn Feiners

            A strange affair took place in Dundalk on Friday night. An ex-soldier named James Mulligan, when walking down the Main street, was stopped by three young men, and interrogated as to his movements in the afternoon. While this conversation was proceeding a motor car stopped a few yards away, and the driver entered a shop to make a purchase. While there the shop was visited by three men who presented revolvers at the motorist, and ordered him to take his car down the street. When he did so, Mulligan was pulled into it, and driven off to an unknown destination. He was kept in custody throughout Friday night, but was released early on Saturday, the “police” having declared there was no evidence against him. It is stated that he was arrested in connection with the “hold up”  of a young brewery clerk who was robbed of £50 outside the Courthouse on Friday afternoon while the Assizes

(Irish Times, 5 July 1920)

 

 MULLIGAN, sailor, Patrick. S.S. Dunsley. From Brown’s Row, Dundalk.

About the same time that the White Star Liner “Arabic” was torpedoed by a German submarine on last Thursday, and almost at the same spot, there was sent to the bottom a merchant vessel named Dunsley.  The Dunsley was owned by the London and Northern Steamship Company, London, and was engaged between Liverpool, Boston and New York with general cargoes. SO close to the Arabic was the Dunsley when the German submarine came along that the captain of the liner when being towed to safety saw what remained of the merchant vessel and could clearly discern three shell holes in her.  The crew of the submarine made certain that the Dunsley should not be left afloat, because no less than 28 shells were discharged at her before the Germans left to look for another victim.

Amongst the 37 who formed the crew of the ill-fated Dunsley was a Dundalk youth, Patrick Mulligan, of Brown’s Row, who is at present at home after his adventurous time. Though only 18 years of age, young Mulligan had already served on two vessels previous to joining the Dunsley.  On the night of Tuesday, 17th August, he left Liverpool as a sailor on the merchant vessel. They lay outside the Mersey that night and on Wednesday began their trip. Nothing of note occurred until Thursday morning at ten past six, when Mulligan was awakened from sleep, and on coming on deck discovered that the vessel was being shelled by a submarine. In the shelling two members of the crew – a Russian Finn and an English cook – were killed.  The remaining 36 at once made for the boats and successfully launched the two lifeboats with which the vessels was equipped. The submarine came alongside the Dunsley, but none of the crew could board her, the accommodation ladder having been cut away before the life boats were launched. The crew of the merchant vessel rowed about for some time and were picked up by a Belfast steamer, the Howth Head. When twenty miles off land they were transferred to a torpedo destroyer which brought them to Queenstown.

In getting into the lifeboat young Mulligan had sustained injuries to his hand and back, and on arrival at Queenstown was taken to the hospital for treatment there. He was able to leave next day and arrived in Dundalk early this week looking nothing the worse after his exciting time. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 August 1915)

 

DUNSLEY, Gross tonnage 4930. Built 1913. Sunk on 19 August 1915. Captured and sunk by gunfire in the Atlantic 48 miles S. by W. from Old Head of Kinsale in position 50.50N 08.30W by the German submarine U24 whilst on a voyage from Liverpool to Boston, Mass. With general cargo. 2 lost. (Tennant)

 

MULLAN, Rifleman, J, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MULLAN, GEORGE, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MULLANY, Bombardier, JOSEPH, Royal Field Artillery

Miss Traynor, of Fair Green, has received intimation that her nephew, Bdr Joseph Mullany is a prisoner in Germany. His last letter was dated 27th November, and he seems to have been captured a day or two later, so that it has taken more than a month for the news to come through. His elder brother, who was in the battle of Mons, has been a prisoner in Germany for over three years; and an uncle is serving with the forces in Egypt. Bdr Mullany before joining the army was a clerk with the firm of H F and J M’Cann. His many friends will be glad to know that he is safe and sound, though a prisoner of war. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 January 1918)

 

MULLEN, Bugler, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MULLEN, R J, Inspector of new drafts. Wounded 7 times in Boer War. Mentioned in Despatches. From 2 Maxwell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MULROY, J, Royal Navy. From Hardman’s Gardens, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MUNSTER, PATRICK.

A troublesome ex-soldier. In an adjourned case against Patrick Munster, an ex-soldier who had been wounded at the front, for refusing to leave the licensed premises of Mr Egan.

Constable Miley said the defendant’s conduct was very bad on the occasion. He struck Mr Egan’s shop assistant, and witness had to forcibly remove him from the premises. Two summonses against him were dismissed at a previous court.

The same defendant was summoned by Constable Reardon for drunkenness and disorderly conduct, and for begging on the 16th inst.

Complainant said that when on duty at the Tholsel a couple of touring cars passed and one of the men got off to ask witness some questions. The defendant then came up and demanded money for drink. Witness cautioned him, and he went away, but immediately afterwards returned. Witness cautioned him about his conduct and he made use of very filthy expressions towards him. He was drunk at the time and was evidently anxious to be arrested. He was a perfect nuisance. Any respectable person who saw him approaching turned away from his direction. AT present when he saw the witness on the street he went into the middle of the footpath and came up to give him annoyance. His conduct had become so bad that he was a disgrace to the town.

In the adjourned case he was fines 40s with the option of a month’s imprisonment, and for being drunk and disorderly he was sent o jail for a month. The case for begging was dismissed. (Drogheda Advertiser, 2 September 1916)

 

MURDOCK, FV, Officer Training Corps. Frederick Victor Murdock was born to Frederick William, a merchant of South Quay, Drogheda, and Marion Murdock on 14 May 1900. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MURDOCK, WALTER, Lothian Border Horse. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

MURPHY, ARTHUR, 282957, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address, 97 Custom House Street, Dundalk, Co Louth. Born 12 August 1887, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Seaman.  Next-of-kin, Mary Murphy, 97 Dacre Hill, Rock Ferry, Cheshire, England, sister.  Attested on  28 March 1916, at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. (Note : There was no address  “Custom House Street” in Dundalk. The Custom House was in Quay Street, perhaps this is the street referred to.)

 

MURPHY, BERNARD, Connaught Rangers. Born Dundalk, 1895. Son of Bernard and Bridget Murphy, who emigrated to Cumberland in the mid 1890s.  Brother of Pte. Patrick James Murphy, Connaught Rangers, killed in action in Mesopotamia, 1916. (See The Unreturned Army).

 

MURPHY, EDWARD, Royal Navy. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, Rifleman, GEORGE, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifle. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MURPHY, J. From Gray’s Lane, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MURPHY, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, Private, JACK, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, JAMES. South Irish Horse. Baker from Stameen Lodge, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, JAMES, Canadians. Son of Mr P J Murphy, R D C Blackrock. Brother of Lieutenant Philip Murphy, RAMC

… Mr Murphy’s second son, James, is in the Canadians and has been through some of the severest fighting lately in which the colonials so distinguished themselves. He sent home to Blackrock a tin tobacco box which undoubtedly saved his life, for it diverted a bullet that would otherwise have found a billet in his body. We hope these plucky young Blackrock men will continue to enjoy this ruin of good luck. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 May 1917)

           

MURPHY, JOHN, Royal Navy, HMS Marlborough.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, JOHN, 3677, 25 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Greenore, Co Louth, 20 June 1887. Age 30 years. Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Katherine Murphy, Greenore, Co Louth, mother. Enlisted 21 June 1917.  In England 3 October 1917.  In France 16 January 1918. Charged with drunkenness, admonished by Commanding Officer, 18 February 1918. Wounded in both thighs and shoulder  2 September 1918. To England 5 September 1918. Absent without leave 24.February 1919 to 25 February 1919. Admonished, forfeited  1 days pay. Invalided to Australia 1 April 1919. Discharged 14 June 1919.  Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

MURPHY, MATT, HMS Dreadnought, Royal Naval Reserve. Serving ‘somewhere’.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, MATTHEW, Royal Navy. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, Private, MICHAEL, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Formerly of Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, NICHOLAS, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Chapel Lane, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(Meeting of Dundalk Urban Council). An application was received from an employee named Nicholas Murphy for an allowance during war service.

The Chairman said the general rule would apply.

Mr. O’Rourke – What is the general rule?

Chairman – 4s a week

Mr McCoy – For being a patriot?

Mr O’Rourke – A man with a wife and child gets 4s, and a man with no wife or family gets 15s.

Mr McCoy – Yes but he said in a speech down the country that he had seven of a family (laughter)

It was agreed to allow 4s. (Dundalk Democrat ? November 1915)

 

            Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 26 August 1916)

 

MURPHY, P, Royal Navy, HMS Birmingham. Employee of the L and Y Railway Co. Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, P, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, PATRICK, South Irish Horse. Formerly of ‘B’ company, Drogheda Volunteers. Stationed at Leopardstown.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURPHY, PATRICK, Royal Scots Fusiliers. From Cappoge, Dunleer. Wounded at Ypres; ‘was home and is now gone back’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

MURPHY, Lieutenant, PHILIP, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Blackrock, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1918). Brother of James Murphy who served with the Canadians.

Lieutenant Philip Murphy, R A M C, (eldest son of Mr P J Murphy, R D C Blackrock), had an unpleasant experience lately, having been on board a hospital ship which was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean. The surgical staff and nurses were all saved, through some of the officer and crew of the ship were drowned. (Dundalk Democrat, 19 May 1917)

 

Amongst those on board the Transylvania transport which was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean recently was Lieut. Philip Murphy RAMC, son of Mr P J Murphy J P of Blackrock. In a letter to his mother Lieut Murphy gives some interesting details of his experience.

“I was about three hours on a raft not much larger than your wicker card table. The sea was pretty calm during the morning and even after the torpedo struck us, but towards noon, when we were on boats, rafts etc. it became rather rough, and I was continually washed off my raft, but fortunately God was good to me, and I usually came up within easy reach of it. On my raft there was a major and two captains for about two hours, but after an extra big wave we parted company, but the raft and I stuck together with the addition of two soldiers from another raft. At any rate whatever happens continue your prayers for Jim and me as I really think it is to the Masses you had offered up for our safety that I must credit my good fortune. During all my time on the raft I had a feeling of complete safety although my companions at various times were for throwing up the sponge but I always said ‘No’. I was picked up by a tug boat from the port of refuge, and the first person I saw was the dead major and one of the captains in a collapsed condition. There were five of us very friendly as we had been all the way from  - together and occupied the same tent. Four of us belonged to the RAMC. Unfortunately one of us Lieut Brown as lost. He was Scotch, and great fun and we are all extremely sorry. He was married and had one child. I met his young wife before we left England. GET REST

(Dundalk Democrat, 2 June 1917)

 

Dr Philip Murphy (son of Mr Patrick Murphy, J P Blackrock), who joined the

R A M C in March 1917, has received rapid promotion, now being advanced to the rank of Major. He is at present Registrar to the 19th General Hospital at Alexandria, a post of considerable responsibility for so young a man.

(Dundalk Democrat, 13 July 1918)

 

MURPHY, THOMAS,  1871, 9 Infantry Battalion, 4 Regiment, Australian Imperial Force.  Age 35 years and five months.  Born Dundalk, Co Louth. Occupation Fireman. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin,  Mrs B Murphy,  17 Pincers Lane, Dundalk, Co Louth, mother.  Previous military experience, 12 years in Black Watch. Enlisted 16 March 1915.  Due to embark 8 April 1915, but didn’t. Discharged 14 April 1915.

 

MURPHY TIMOTHY , Originally enlisted October 1915, no 3892, Australian Imperial Force,  to France, 12 June 1916. Wounded 5 July 1916, and 12 August 1916.  To hospital in England 18 August 1916. November 6 to November 11,  1916, absent without leave . Awarded 7 days confined to camp and forfeit 6 days pay.  November 16, 1916, absent without leave from Tattoo until 11.p.m. and creating a disturbance in the hut. Awarded 72 hours detention. To Australia 4 May 1917. Discharged 8 August 1917,’ defective vision of r eye.’  Re- enlisted 18 August 1917, 15287, 22nd Depot.  Age 38, born Dundalk, Co Louth. Occupation Sailor. Next-of-kin, Mrs Rose Hughes, Killencoole Castle, Bellingham, Co Louth., mother  Previous military experience 18 Months 51 Battalion Australian Imperial Force,  wound right shoulder and right eye.  Discharged 18 October 1917, ‘services no longer required’. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

MURTAGH, JOHN, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk.

 

MURTAGH, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham, Co. Louth.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

MURRAY, Second Lieutenant, FELIX, Royal Sussex Regiment.

Felix Murphy, second son of Mr T Murray, chief clerk in the Crown and Peace Office, has been gazetted Second Lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment. He is only 19 years, and was a Civil Service student a little time back. Quite recently he took a very high place in an examination for the Civil Service, but instead of going into an office he joined the Inns of Court O T C. There is no lack of pluck in this boy. His elder brother, too, has been showing the same good stuff. He is in the merchant service and for the last two years has been almost constantly in the ‘war zone’ somewhere or other. Eight months of that time he spent in Mesopotamia. (Dundalk Democrat, 15 December 1917)

 

MURRAY, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 MURRAY, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MURRAY, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Peter Street, Drogheda. Formerly Section Commander, ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers.

Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

MYERS, Driver, P, Royal Field Artillery. From Priorland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

MYERS, Rifleman, THOMAS, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Priorland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

MYLES, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Ardee. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 September 1916)

 

¦ Introduction ¦ Abernethy - Durnan ¦ Earl - Knox ¦ Ladley - Myles ¦ Neary - Wykes ¦

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