Samuel Lewis:

Gernonstown - Newtown-Drogheda

 

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1837 Gernonstown - Newtown-Drogheda

 

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GERNONSTOWN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, on the river Glyde and on the road from Drogheda to Dundalk; the population, including that of the post-town of Castle-Bellingham, is returned with the parish of Kilsaran. This parish, which for all civil purposes is considered a part of Kilsaran, comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1302 statute acres, of which 17 are in the river Glyde; the soil is principally clay, with some loam and gravel; the system of agriculture is greatly improved, and the land generally in a good state of cultivation. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and part of the union of Kilsaran; the tithes amount to £146. 15. 4. The church of the union is in this parish, and is situated close to the town of Castle-Bellingham. In the R.C. divisions it is part of the union or district of Kilsaran.

 

 

GREENMOUNT, or DROMKEATH, a village, in the parish of KILSARAN, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1 mile (S.) from Castle-Bellingham, on the road from Drogheda to Dundalk; containing 44 houses and 243 inhabitants. Here is an extensive camp, consisting of a high mound with a hollow area at the top, and partly encompassed by a single trench. At one extremity is a tumulus, on the side of which is an embanked area with a circular end, in which local tradition states that the first parliament ever assembled in Ireland was held.

 

 

HAGGARDSTOWN, a parish, in the barony of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (S.) from Dundalk, on the road from Dublin to Belfast; containing, with the village of Blackrock. 1011 inhabitants. This parish comprises 1400¼ statute acres, according to the Ordnance survey, nearly the whole of which is very excellent land and under tillage. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, entirely impropriate in T. Fortescue, Esq.: the tithes amount to £178. 16. 3½. There is neither church, glebe-house, nor glebe. In the R.C. divisions it is the head of a union or district, also called Kilcurley, which comprises the parishes of Haggardstown, Heynstown, Ballybarrack, Philipstown, Dunbin, and part of Baronstown: a handsome chapel was erected here in 1833, and there is another at Baronstown. Here is a school of about 150 children; and there are some remains of the old church and also of an ancient castle.

 

 

HEYNSTOWN, or HAINSTOWN [HAYNESTOWN], a parish, in the barony of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2½ miles (S.) from Dundalk, on the road to Ardee; containing 442 inhabitants. This parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1980½ statute acres, which are chiefly under tillage. It is well planted, and the scenery is highly picturesque; there is an abundance of good building stone. Prospect, the seat of W.H. Richardson, Esq., commands a very extensive view; and Clermont Park, that of T. Fortescue, Esq., stands in a handsome and well wooded demesne, comprising about 600 statute acres. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate: the tithes amount to £350; there is neither glebe-house nor glebe. The church is a plain modern structure, near which are some remains of an ancient round tower. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Haggardstown, at which place is the chapel. Here are the ruins of Dunmahon castle, consisting of a quadrangular pile, with circular towers of dissimilar sizes at the angles.

 

 

INNISKEEN, or ENNISKEEN, a parish, partly in the baronies of LOUTH and UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, but chiefly in the barony of FARNEY, county of MONAGHAN, and province of ULSTER, 4 miles (N.) from Louth, on the road to Castle-Blayney; contining 3698 inhabitants. According to the Ordnance survey it comprises 6192¾ statute acres, of which 86¼ are in the barony of Louth, 1116½ in Upper Dundalk, and 4990 in Farney; 5534 acres are applotted under the tithe act. Here is a constabulary police station. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Clogher, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £447. 13. 10¼. The glebe-house was erected by aid of a loan of £675 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1821. The church is a neat plain structure with an ancient burial-ground, in which is a vault bearing the date 1672, built by Col. Mac Mahon, a descendant of the corbes of Clones: the belfry is one of the ancient round towers. In the R.C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, including also part of Donaghmoyne, and containing a neat chapel here and one at Drumcatton, erected on land given by F. Evans, Esq., of Mountjoy-square, Dublin, who also gave a site adjacent for a school-house. The parochial school, which is a good stone building, was erected at an expense of £200 by subscription and a grant from the Lord-Lieutenant's fund. Here are also two Sunday schools. St. Dagens is said to have founded an abbey or bishoprick here in the beginning of the sixth century, which is not mentioned later than the eleventh century, although some remains of it still exist. Here is an extensive Danish fort.

 

 

KENE, or CAINE [KANE], also called INISKIN, a parish, in the barony of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (N.N.W.) from Dundalk, on the road from that place to Crossmeglan; containing 373 inhabitants. It comprises 749½ acres, and in it is Falmore Hall, the residence of Mrs. Eastwood. At Killen are some large limestone quarries and kilns. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and is partly appropriate to the see and partly one of the four parishes which constitute the union of Baronstown: the tithes amount to £72. 15. 7. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Dundalk, and has a chapel at Killen. There is a private school, in which about 70 children are educated. At Killen hill and in its vicinity formerly existed some druidical remains; and about a quarter of a mile from them is a mount with two successive slopes and terraces, surmounted by the ruins of a building shaped like the hull of an ancient ship.

 

 

KILDEMOCK, or KILDERNOCK, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1 mile (S.S.E.) from Ardee, on the road from that place to Drogheda; containing 996 inhabitants. According to the Ordnance survey it comprises 3246 statute acres, of which 2754 are applotted under the tithe act. The land is principally under tillage, with no waste or bog; there is a good limestone quarry. Drakestown is the seat of N. Manning, Esq. There is a constabulary police station at that place. The parish is in the diocese of Armagh, and is a rectory, forming part of the union of Ardee: the tithes amount to £200. The glebe-house of the union, built in 1781, at an expense of £1010. 1. 6., is situated here; the glebe comprises 40 acres, valued at £120 per annum. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Ardee, and has a handsome chapel at Drakestown. About 360 children are educated in two public schools, one of which is supported by the rector. The old church is in ruins.

 

 

KILLANEY, a parish, partly in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, but chiefly in the barony of FARNEY, county of MONAG­HAN, and province of ULSTER, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Carrickmacross, on the road from Carrick to Dundalk; containing 4823 inhabitants, of which number 1424 are in Louth. The rivers Glyde and Ballymackney flow through this parish; and the Earl of Essex had an interview, in 1599, at Essexford, with O'Nial, Earl of Tyrone. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey (including 167¾ acres in the detached townland of Essexford, and 106¼ under water), 7127¼ statute acres, of which 1939¼ are in Louth, and 5188 in Monaghan; 5870 acres are applotted under the tithe act, and chiefly in tillage, and 500 acres consist of bog. The principal seats are Moynalty, the residence of T. McEvoy Gartland, Esq., and Ballymackney House, of W. Daniel, Esq. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Clogher, and in the patronage of the Bishop; the tithes amount to £461. 10. 9¼. The church is a small ancient structure. There is a glebe-­house, with a glebe of 90 acres. In the R.C. divisions this parish is partly in the union or district of Carrickmacross, and partly the head of a district, comprising also three or four townlands in the parish of Louth; it contains two chapels, one at Corcreagh, belonging to the Carrickmacross district, and the other in the village of Killaney. About 270 children are educated in five private schools, and there is a Sunday school. Here are the ruins of an ancient church, and of a fortification on a conical hill, called Mount Killaney.

 

 

KILLINCOOLE, a parish, in the barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 4 miles (S.E.) from Lurgan-Green, on the road from Ardee to Dundalk; containing 770 inhabitants. According to the Ordnance survey it comprises 1397¼ statute acres, without any waste land or bog. It is mostly under tillage, and the soil is good and well cultivated. Here is a flax and an oatmeal mill. Stone is quarried for building, and repairing the roads. The principal seats are Fair Valley, the residence of Mervyn Pratt, Esq.; Killincoole Castle, the property of M. Fortescue, Esq.; and the glebe-house, of the Rev. J. Wright. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate; the tithes amount to £241. 18. 3. The church is a neat plain building, erected about 1805 by aid of a loan of £500 from the late Board of First Fruits, and has lately been repaired by a grant of £126 from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The glebe-house is a handsome residence on a glebe of 15 acres. In the R.C. divisions this parish forms part of the union or district of Darver and Dromiskin. About 14 children are educated in a public school, which is supported by the rector, and about 70 in a private school. The ancient castle of Killincoole is a square building with circular towers at the angles, and has a cave under its eastern side, which is supposed to lead to a well.

 

 

KILSARAN or KILSORRAN, a parish in the barony of ARDEE, county of Louth, and province of Leinster, on the mail coach road from Dublin to Belfast; containing, with the parish of Gernonstown and the post-town of Castle-Bellingham, 3254 inhabitants. A commandery of Knights Templars was founded here in the 12th century by Matilda de Lacy, which was granted, in the reign of Edw. II., to the Knights Hospitallers. In 1483, Keating, prior of Kilmainham, appointed Marmaduke Lomley preceptor, but some time after threw him into prison, where he died of a broken heart. According to the Ordnance survey the parish comprises 3393½ statute acres, of which 8127 are applotted under the tithe act and valued at £3732 per ann. The land is of superior quality, and is chiefly under a good system of tillage; there is neither waste nor bog. The surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified, and the neighbourhood is embellished with several hand­some seats, among which are Milestown, the residence of J. Woolsey, Esq.; Greenmount, of T. Macan, Esq.; Maine, of B.B. Stafford, Esq.; and Kilsaran, of M. Chester, Esq. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, united by statute of the 9th of Anne, cap. 12, to the rectory of Gernonstown, and in the patronage of J. McClintock, Esq.: the tithes of this parish amount to £359. 1. 6.; and the value of the union, including tithes and glebe, is £544. 16. 10. The glebe-house was built about 70 years since by Mrs. Spencer; the glebe comprises 19½ acres of profitable land, valued at £39 per ann. The church of the union is at Castle-Bellingham. In the R.C. divisions this is the head of a union or district, comprising the parishes of Kilsaran, Gernonstown, and Stabannon, and containing chapels at Kilsaran and Stabannon, of which the former is a large building adjoining the ruins of the ancient church. The parochial school is aided by an annual donation of £10 from the rector; adjoining the R.C. chapel is a national school; and there are also a female and an infants' school, supported by subscriptions: about 320 children are educated in these schools.

 

 

LOUTH, a post-town and parish, partly in the ba­ronies of ARDEE and UPPER DUNDALK, but chiefly in the barony of LOUTH, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 5½ miles (W.) from Dundalk, on the road to Kingscourt, and 39½ (N. by W.) from Dublin; containing 9721 inhabitants, of which number, 613 are in the town. This place, called anciently Knockfergus, and also Cluain-Caoin, was celebrated for an abbey founded here by St. Patrick, over which he placed St. Mocteus or Mochtalugh, a Briton, who died at a very advanced age in 534. The monastery became a very extensive seat of learning under the superintendence of St. Mocteus and his successors; and it is said that 100 bishops and 300 presbyters, all eminent for learning and piety, were educated in this school. St. Dichull, who became abbot about the commencement of the 8th century, and several of his successors, were styled indifferently abbots or bishops; and the monastery continued to flourish till 880, when it was pillaged by the Danes, by whom the abbey was destroyed in 839 and many of the brethren killed. In 968, while in the possession of the Danes, the abbey was plundered by Muirceartagh, son of Donell, King of Ireland, who slew many of  these invaders; and in 1043, this place and the adjacent country were plundered by Andatus O'Ruairc, who was himself soon after slain. In 1075, the town, with all its churches, was destroyed by fire; and in 1133 and 1148 the abbey experienced a similar calamity, from which it never seems to have recovered. Donchad O'Kervaill, prince of Orgial, and Edan O'Coellaidhe, Bishop of Clogher, who had recently founded the abbey of Knock, jointly erected a priory on its site for Canons Regular, which was subsequently made a sanctuary by Malachy, Archbishop of Armagh: the prior sat as a baron in parliament. The town was destroyed by fire in 1152, 1160, and 1166, when it was also plundered; and in 1242 a grand chapter of the order was held in the priory by the Archbishop of Armagh, at which were assembled all the abbots and priors of the Canons Regular in the kingdom; Edward Bruce and other leaders of the Scottish army were entertained here, in 1315, by the prior, who was afterwards pardoned by Edw. II. on payment of a fine of £40; and in 1488, the prior, who had been concerned in the insurrection of Lambert Simnel, received the king's pardon. John Wile, who had alienated a considerable portion of the revenues of the establishment, and who was prior at the time of the dissolution, voluntarily resigned his office into the king's hands and received a pension of £16. 13. 4., for the remainder of his life; and the priory, with all its revenues, was granted in the 33rd of Hen. VIII. to Oliver Plunkett, ancestor of the present proprietor. The town is situated on the river Glyde, and from a grant made by Hen. IV. to the "Bailiff and Commons of the Town of Loueth," releasing them from two parts of the chief rents during the minority of Lord D'Arcey, it appears to have had a municipal government prior to 1406. It contains 126 houses, and has a sub-post-office to Ardee, Carrickmacross, and Dundalk. There is a constabulary police station, and another at Glyde Farm, in the parish. Fairs are held every month in the village of Mullacrew, and petty sessions every Thursday in the town.

 

The parish; according to the Ordnance survey, comprises 17,842¼ statute acres, of which 2081¼ are in the barony of Ardee, 1654½ in that of Upper Dundalk, and 14,107 in that of Louth. The land is of very good quality and principally under tillage, producing abundant crops; the system of agriculture is improved; there is very little bog, and not any waste land. The principal seats are Stephenstown, the residence of M. Fortescue, Esq., a handsome mansion in a highly improved demesne of 500 acres, well planted and watered by the river Fane, which here separates the parish from that of Killincoole; Glyde Farm, the property of T. Fortescue, Esq., at present in the occupation of G. Wade, Esq., a handsome residence in tastefully disposed grounds; and Corderry, of Faithful Fortescue, Esq. There is an extensive flour-mill at Channon Rock, and there are also two corn-mills at the southern extremity of the parish, near Killincoole. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Crown for two presentations, and the Lord-Primate for one. The tithes amount to £1988. 1. 9.; the glebe­house was built in 1813, at an expense of £4940. 6. 1¾., and the glebe comprises 64¾ statute acres of cultivated land, valued at £147. 14. 2. The church is a plain structure, erected about 1807 and enlarged in 1828 by parochial assessment; it has a tower and spire, which are not yet completed, and has been recently repaired by a grant of £242 from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The R.C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; there are three chapels, situated at Louth, Knockbridge, and Stonetown; the two first are spacious edifices. About 500 children are taught in four public schools, of which the parochial school in the town, with an infants' school attached to it, is partly supported by the rector; one near Glyde Farm by the trustees of Erasmus Smith's charity, also aided by the rector; and one on the demesne of Stephenstown, supported by the rector and M. Fortescue, Esq. There are five private schools, in which are about 400 children; and a dispensary for the poor, who, when unable to attend, are visited at their own dwellings. At Ardpatrick, in this parish, a church was founded by St. Patrick, of which no part remains; and at Knock a monastery for Canons Regular, and dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, was founded in 1148, by Donchad O'Kervaill, prince of Orgial, and Edan Coellaidhe, Bishop of Clogher, who also founded the priory of Louth. Marian O'Gorman, who was abbot in 1167, composed a martyrology in the Irish language, which existed in the time of Colgan and was then in great esteem; the endowment was augmented by Hugh de Ardiz, in 1260, but was yet insufficient for the maintenance of its establishment. The abbot surrendered the monastery, with its revenues, in the 31st of Hen. VIII.; and Jas. I., in the 3rd of his reign, granted it to Sir John King, Knt., at the yearly rent of £16. 10. 4.; there are no remains. On the summit of a hill near this place is Mount Ash, a curious fort, supposed to be of Danish origin; it consists of an oval mount, the surface of which is depressed, and surrounded with a vallum, and around two-thirds of the circumference is a second vallum with a ditch. On the glebe land is Fairy Mount, an abrupt conical eminence surrounded by a high earthen vallum; and Castle-Ring, near the town, is of similar construction, but more elevated, and has a small stream surrounding it between the vallum and the counterscarp; on the summit are the foundations of a hexagonal mural fort. The remains of the ancient abbey of Louth, founded by St. Patrick, or rather of the priory subsequently erected on its site, are extensive but in a very dilapidated state; and the cemetery is still a favourite place of interment. Dr. Plunkett, the R.C. Archbishop of Armagh, who was executed in London for high treason, was for some time resident here.

 

 

LURGAN-GREEN, a post-town, in the parish of DROMISKIN, barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (S.) from Dundalk, and 37 (N.) from Dublin, on the mail road to Belfast; containing 41 houses and 224 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Fane, and immediately adjoining the beautiful and extensive demesne of Clermont Park, the seat of Thos. Fortescue, Esq. A constabulary police force is stationed here, and fairs are held on July 25th, and Nov. 11th.

 

 

MANFIELDSTOWN, or MOUNTFIELDSTOWN, a parish, in the barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2½ miles (W.) from Castle-Bellingham, on the river Glyde; containing 1061 inhabitants, of which number, 182 are in the village. According to the Ordnance survey, it comprises 2417¾ statute acres, in general of excellent quality, and nearly all under tillage: there are about 50 acres of bog; the system of agriculture has much improved. The village, which is neat, consists of 28 houses. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate: the tithes amount to £271.9. 8½.; and the gross revenue of the benefice, tithes and glebe inclusive, is £283. 9. 8½.; The glebe comprises two acres, on which some cabins have been built, forming part of the village. The church is a very ancient structure in good repair. There is a R.C. chapel, and a parochial school, in which about 40 boys and 10 girls are taught; the master receives £10 per annum from the incumbent.

 

 

MAPASTOWN, or MAPLESTOWN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2½ miles (N.N.E.) from Ardee, on the road to Dundalk; containing 458 inhabitants. This parish, which is the estate of Charles Cobbe, Esq., of Newbridge, county of Dublin, is situated on the river Glyde, which is crossed by a bridge, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1446¼ statute acres of good arable and pasture land: the system of agriculture is rapidly improving. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, forming part of the union of Charlestown or Philipstown; the rectory is impropriate in the Hon. Baron Foster. The tithes amount to £107. 19. 2., of which £9 13. is paid to the vicar, and the remainder to the impropriator. The church is in ruins. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Ardee.

 

 

MARLlNSTOWN [MARLESTOWN], a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1½ mile. (S. E.) from Dunleer, on the coast road from Drogheda to Dundalk; containing 202 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance, survey, 758¾ statute acres, the greater portion of which is under tillage, and the remainder affords excellent pasture; the soil is fertile, the system of agriculture improved, and the lands are all in a state of profitable cultivation. The surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied; and in the parish is Rokeby Hall, the property of Sir Richard Robinson, Bart., now in the occupation of the Count de Salis, a spacious mansion, situated in a well-planted demesne commanding some very interesting views; the house contains a fine collection of paintings by some of the old masters. The parish is in the diocese of Armagh; it is a vicarage, forming part of the union of Dunany; the rectory is impropriate in -- Hall, Esq. The tithes amount to £70. 9. 11. of which £40. 19. 2 is payable to the impropriator, and £29, 9. 11. to the vicar. About 60 children are taught in a private school.

 

 

MAINE [MAYNE], a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 5¾ miles (N.E. by N.) from Drogheda; containing 360 inhabitants. It is situated on the eastern coast, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1060¾ statute acres of excellent land, principally under tillage; there is no bog. It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, forming part of the union of Termonfechan: the tithes amount to:£90, and there is a glebe of 6 acres, valued at £9. 16. 10½. per annum. In the R.C. divisions it is part of the union or district of Clogher. About 60 children are taught in a private school. The ruins of an ancient church exist here.

 

 

MELLIFONT, a parish, partly in the barony of UPPER SLANE, county of MEATH, and partly in that of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 4 miles (N.) from Drogheda, near the road to Ardee, by way of Collon; containing, with the parish of Tullyallen, 3964 inhabitants. This place derived its chief celebrity from the foundation of a monastery in 1142, by Donough McCorvoill or Carrol, Prince of Uriel, for Cistercian monks sent over by St. Bernard from his abbey of Clairvaux, and of which Christian O'Conarchy, the first abbot, was, in 1150, consecrated Bishop of Lismore. In 1157 a great synod, at which the Archbishop of Armagh, then apostolic legate, and many princes and bishops were present, was held here for the conse­cration of the church, on which occasion, among numerous munificent benefactors, Devorghal, wife of Tiernan O'Rourk, Prince of Breffny, who afterwards died here in seclusion, presented 60 oz. of gold, a chalice of the same metal for the high altar, and furniture for nine other altars in the church. The ample endowments of the abbey were confirmed by charter of Hen. II., and by King John, who augmented its possessions; and in 1347 and 1349, Edw. III. greatly extended its possessions and privileges; he granted to the abbot the power of life and death within his territories, and the liberty of acquiring a burgage holding in the town of Drogheda, for the residence of the abbots during the sittings of parliament and other great councils. In 1471 and 1472, parliament disannulled the grants, rent-charges, annuities, leases and alienations made by the late Abbot John. In 1540, Richard Conter, the last abbot, resigned the monastery into the King's hands and received a pension of £40 per ann. for life. After the dissolution, the monastery and its revenues, at that time valued at £315. 19., were, on account of the difficulty of defending these possessions against the incursions of the native Irish, granted to Sir Gerald Moore, who converted the abbey into a baronial residence and place of defence. Though situated so near the border of the English pale, the place maintained itself in security against all the attacks of the Irish, till, in the war of 1641, it was besieged by a strong body of the insurgents, when the garrison, consisting only of 15 horse and 22 foot, made a vigorous defence, in which they killed 120 of the enemy, and on their ammunition being exhausted, forced their way through the besiegers and retreated to Drogheda in safety, with the exception of 11 men who were intercepted and put to the sword. The castle was plundered by the insurgents, who, taking advantage of the absence of Lord Moore with his troop of 66 horsemen for the protection of Drogheda, desolated the place and put the servants to death. Mellifont continued for some time after to be the chief residence of the Moore family, till the Earl of Drogheda removed to Monastereven, now Moore abbey, in the county of Kildare, since which time this once magnificent pile of building has become a heap of ruins.

 

The parish is situated in a beautiful small valley intersected by the Mattock rivulet, which flows into the Boyne; the land is fertile and in good cultivation. Near the ruins of the abbey is a large flour-mill, worked by water which flows under the ancient gateway, and turns four pairs of stones. It is an impropriate curacy, in the diocese of Armagh, forming part of the union of Tullyallen; the rectory is impropriate in the Marquess of Drogheda, In the R.C. divisions it is also part of the union or district of Tullyallen. The ruins of the ancient abbey, for which this parish is chiefly celebrated, consist principally of the lofty gateway leading into the area of the abbey grounds, and a massive square tower carried up on one side to a considerable height, and forming a strong protection against the frequent assaults to which the place was exposed; it is connected with the rock by a wall, affording entrance only through a low circular archway. Within the area are the elegant remains of St. Bernard's chapel, the splendid doorway of which, a highly enriched and deeply receding pointed arch in the most elaborate style of Norman embellish­ment, has been removed. The interior of the chapel is plainly groined with arches springing from columns on the side walls with ornamented capitals, and lighted with an east window of two lights, enriched with delicate tracery, and with three windows of similar design on each side. The baptistry, an octagonal building of great beauty, has only four of the walls remaining, each resting on an arch of graceful form and richly moulded; the roof is wanting but within are the corbels on the walls from which the arches sprung for its support; above the roof of this building was a reservoir of water, from which every part of the monastery was supplied. There are also the foundations of a spacious quadrangular building, probably the cloisters; and near the summit of the hill is a large cemetery, with some remains of a church, apparently of a much later date; there are numerous fragments of richly sculptured pillars scattered over the site, and though these very interesting ruins afford but an imperfect idea of the original grandeur of this celebrated monastery, they present in their details many of the richest specimens of architectural embellishment to be found in any part of the country.

 

 

MILESTOWN, a village, in the parish of KILSARAN, barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, ¼ of a mile (S.) from Castle-Bellingham, on a mail road to Dublin; containing 23 houses and 108 inhabitants.

 

 

MONASTERBOICE, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2½ miles (E.S.E.) from Collon, near the road from Drogheda to Dunleer; containing 705 inhabitants. This place is chiefly distinguished for the remains of the monastery from which it derived its name, founded by St. Bute or Boetius, the son of Bronagh, who died in 521; it was plundered in 968, and in 1097 was destroyed by fire. From this time it appears to have subsisted only for a few years; the last abbot of whom any notice occurs died in 1117. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 2316½ statute acres, most of which is good land, and in a profitable state of cultivation. Monasterboice, the seat of W. Drummond Delap, Esq., who has a large estate here and is planting on an extensive scale, is undergoing great improvement, and a spacious mansion is now being erected by the proprietor. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, forming part of the union of Dunleer; the tithes amount to £116. 12. The ruins of the monastery are of very interesting character: at a short distance from each other are the walls and gables of two churches or chapels, the architecture of which denotes very great antiquity; the windows are of freestone, but the rest of the building is of a slaty stone found in the surrounding hills. On the south side of the western church are two ancient and elaborately sculptured stone crosses, one 18 and the other 16 feet high; the larger, apparently formed of an entire stone, and called St. Boyne's Cross, has near its base some obliterated characters, supposed to be traces of the name Muredach, King of Ireland, who died in 534; the arms are enclosed within a circle, and the shaft and other parts are ornamented with figures sculptured in relief, which, though much defaced, appear to have represented scriptural subjects; on one side is the crucifixion, and on the other a figure of St. Patrick. Near the western extremity of this chapel are the remains of an ancient round tower, diminishing gradually in circumference from its base, which is 18 feet in diameter, to the summit which has an elevation of 110 feet; it is divided by circular projecting abutments, for the support of floors; the internal diameter is 9 feet, and the doorway is about 6 feet from the ground. The surrounding cemetery is still used; in digging a grave were found three ancient Anglo-Saxon coins, two of the reign of Edmund and one of Athelstan.

 

 

MOSSTOWN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (S.W.) from Dunleer, on the road to Collon; containing 1229 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 3817¾ statute acres, chiefly in tillage, and under an improved system of agriculture. Rathescar, the seat of the Hon. Baron Foster (formerly belonging to a branch of the Barnewall family), is a spacious mansion, erected on the site of an ancient castle. The Baron has erected an excellent observatory, which being raised to a considerable height above the house, forms a conspicuous object at a distance, and commands extensive views: the gardens and hot-houses are of the first character; and the demesne, which comprises about 480 statute acres, is well planted, tastefully disposed, and embellished with a fine sheet of water. It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, forming part of the union of Collon: the tithes amount to £248. 14. 11., and there is a glebe of three acres, valued at £5. 9. 10. per annum. In the R.C. divisions it is part of the union or district of Dunleer, and has a chapel at Philipstown. The school at Philipstown is aided by an annual donation of £10 from the Hon. Baron Foster: in this and in a private school about 180 children are educated.

 

 

MULLACREW, a village, in the parish, barony, and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 6½ miles (S.W.) from Dundalk, on the road from Ardee, by Louth, to Castle-Blayney; containing 124 houses and 596 in­habitants. It is much resorted to as one of the most extensive marts for wool in Ireland, and for its fairs for cattle and pigs, which are held on Feb. 2nd, March 25th, April 4th, May 1st, June 17th, (which is the great wool fair), July 26th, Aug. 15th, Sept. 8th, Oct. 18th, Nov. 16th, and Dec. 21st

 

 

MOYLARY [MULLARY], a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1¾ mile (S. by W.) from Dunleer, on the road from Dublin to Dundalk; containing 1183 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 3635¾ statute acres, chiefly under tillage: the soil is in general light; there is some marshy bog; and within the limits of the parish are several quarries of good building stone. Stone House, the residence of Michael Chester, Esq., is situated in a neat demesne. It is a rectory and perpetual cure, in the diocese of Armagh, the rectory forming part of the union of Dunleer; the perpetual cure, erected in 1818, is in the gift of the Incumbent. The tithes amount to £173. 3. 1.; and the stipend of the curate is £105. 7. 8½. per ann., of which £50 is payable by the rector of Drumcar, under certain stipulations in Primate Marsh's will, and the remainder by the incumbent of Moylary. The glebe, comprising 13¼ acres, is held by the curate, subject to a rent of £27. 13. 10. The glebe-house was built in 1820, at an expense of £507. 13. 10½., British, of which £450 Irish was a gift, and £50 a loan from the late Board of First Fruits. The church is a neat modern structure, altered and repaired in 1811 by a parochial assessment, amounting to £300 Irish. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Moylary, also called the district of Ballymakenny, comprising this parish and parts of Drumshallon and Ballymakenny, and containing the chapels of Tenure in Moylary and Fieldstown in Drumshallon. Attached to the former is a school, in which, and in a private school, about 110 children are educated.


King William's Glen. The obelisk, commemorating the battle of the Boyne (1690), was constructed in the 1730s, and was blown up in the 1920s. The above etching comes from The Gentleman's Magazine September 1799. See below. Reference is also made to the obelisk in Lewis's account of Tullyallen. For additional information click Here.


NEWTOWN-DROGHEDA, a village, in the parish of TULLYALLEN, barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (N. E.) from Drogheda, near the road to Termonfechan; containing 24 houses and 126 inhabitants. It was formerly a chapelry belonging to the abbey of Mellifont, but is not now noticed in the ecclesiastical divisions: it is in a detached portion of the parish, near the river Boyne, and separated from the main body by the county of the town of Drogheda. Here is one of the three R.C. chapels belonging to the district of Tullyallen; and in the demesne of Newtown, immediately adjoining the village, are some vestiges of the ancient church. Newtown House, a handsome residence, is the seat of Fras. Donagh, Esq.; and Green Hills, that of Geo. Smith, Esq., is in the vicinity. In this part of the parish, and near the Boyne Obelisk, is a small picturesque valley, called "King William's Glen."


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