Samuel Lewis:

Castlebellingham - Faughart

 

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1837 Castlebellingham - Faughart

 

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CASTLE-BELLINGHAM, a post-town, in the parish of GERNONSTOWN, barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 6 miles (S.S.E.) from Dundalk, and 34 (N. by W.) from Dublin; containing 115 houses and 611 inhabitants. This town, which is situated on the river Glyde, and on the mail coach road from Dublin to Belfast, takes its name from a castle belonging to the Bellingham family, which was burnt by the forces of Jas. II. in their retreat before the army of King William, previously to the battle of the Boyne. The neighbourhood is embellished with several handsome seats, of which those of Lady Bellingham, Miss Bellingham, Major Sweeny, and Mrs. Filgate are the chief. An extensive brewery, in which the celebrated Castle-Bellingham ale is made, and a large malt­house, both belonging to J. Woolsey, Esq., give employment to about 70 persons. Fairs are held on Easter­Tuesday and Oct. 10th, for cattle, linen, &c. Here is a constabulary police station. The parish church, remarkable for its neatness, is situated in the town, and contains a fine font and some handsome monuments. There is a school supported by subscriptions; and a dispensary. Near the church, and at the entrance to the castle demesne, some neat cottages in the Elizabethan style have been erected for four widows, and endowed with £64 per ann., in 1826, by Sir W. Bellingham, Bart. There are some remains of the ancient castle near the river; and. in a small bog adjoining, several perfect heads, with part of the horns of the elk or moose deer have been found - See GERNONSTOWN and GREENMOUNT.

 

 

 

CASTLETOWN, a parish, partly in the barony of LOWER, but chiefly in that of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1 mile (N.W.) from Dundalk; containing 838 inhabitants. This place is situated on the bay of Dundalk, and on the roads leading respectively to Castle-Blayney and Armagh, which branch off near the village. It derived its name and most probably its origin from the erection of an ancient castle, which in 1318 was assaulted and partly destroyed by Edward Bruce, and which, after sustaining great injury during the parliamentary war, was finally surrendered to Cromwell. The castle occupies an eminence about a mile from Dundalk: the remains, which are nearly in a perfect state, consist of a large quadrangular massive pile, defended at two of the angles by small projecting square towers, and at the two opposite angles by similar towers of larger dimensions, all rising above the high pointed roof of the main building, and crowned with battlements, forming an object of very imposing character. Tradition says that it was a residence of Fingal: it subsequently belonged to the lords Bellew, whom the Boyne family succeeded; and the present proprietor derives his title from a fee-farm grant made by Mr. Sibthorpe, trustee to the late Lord Boyne. The buildings are at present occupied only as offices of the modern mansion adjoining, which is the residence of J. Eastwood, Esq., who intends immediately to convert the castle into a residence. Near the demesne is the residence of Jacob C. Murphy, Esq. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 2610¾ statute acres, of which 2047¾ are in Upper and 563 in Lower Dundalk. The system of agriculture, though better than it was, is still capable of great improvement; the gentlemen who cultivate their own lands have adopted the improved system, but many of the working farmers adhere to the ancient mode. There are some good quarries at Greenfield, from which stone is raised for building and mending the roads. The mountain streams of Philipstown, Dungooley, and Forkhill, unite in this parish, a little before their influx into the sea, forming the river of Castletown, up which the tide flows nearly a mile, affording every facility of navigation.

 

It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, and forms part of the union of Dundalk: the tithes amount to £200. 6. 5¼. In the churchyard are the ruins of an old chapel, which, from an inscription over the altar, appears to have been erected in 1631, by Sir Walter Bellew, Priest, in honour of St. John the Baptist. In the R.C. divisions it is part of the union or district of Dundalk. A national school has been built in the churchyard, and an infants' school is supported under the patronage of the rector, Mr. and Mrs. Eastwood, and Mr. Murphy. On the summit of the hill, on the brow of which the castle is situated, is a remarkable fort, forming a conspicuous object from the plains round Dundalk: in the centre is an extensive circular mount, having on the top a depressed surface, 460 feet in circumference, surrounded by an intrenchment with a high counters carp on the outside. Adjoining this, on the east, is a quadrangular intrenchment, with a rampart, fosse, and counterscarp; and on the west is a semicircular intrenchment similarly formed, but of smaller dimensions. These fortifications occupy the entire summit of the hill, and are prominently conspicuous for many miles around. Various lines of circumvallation may be traced around the castle; and on the plains below are the remains of a fort, little inferior to that on the summit of the hill, and the ruins of the old church or chapel, covered with ivy and presenting a picturesque object, in the cemetery, which is still used as a burial­ground. About a mile from the castle are the ruins of Balrichen castle, within half a mile of which are the remains of a singular fort, called Mount, or Moat Albani, situated near the small river Carrickasticken. The castle or Balrichen, or Balbriggan, which formerly belonged to one of the chiefs of the English pale, is situated on a gradual ascent between two winding rivers: it consisted of a lofty quadrangular tower, with a walled court-yard capable of containing a numerous retinue. Beyond this castle is the pleasant little promontory of Balrichen, between the rivers of Balrichen and Philips­town, which unite near this place. Various druidical remains are scattered over this promontory, the chief of which are a circle of five large upright stones on the summit of a hill, a cairn and several pillars, some detached, and some in groups. On an elevated piece of ground, called Carrickedmond, at no great distance from Balrichen, and near the Carrickasticken river, are numerous druidical relics, consisting of a temple of two concentric circles of large stones, with two smaller stones in the centre, two cairns, the foundations of a circular building, several small circles in which rude earthen kistvaens and human bones have been found, and detached upright stones, some of large size and probably monumental.

 

 

CHARLESTOWN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Ardee; containing 1407 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from Ardee to Monaghan; and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 2699½ statute acres, of which 1797 acres are applotted under the tithe act and valued at £2870 per annum. The land is very fertile, and the system of agriculture much improved: there is some bog, which supplies the inhabitants with fuel, but very little waste land in the parish. A few individuals are employed in weaving linen; but the principal part of the population are engaged in agricultural pursuits. There are some quarries of stone fit for building, but none of limestone. Rahanna, the seat of Clarges Ruxton, Esq., is in this parish. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, united by acts of council, in 1737 and 1754, to the vicarage of Tallanstown, and the rectories of Philipstown, Maplestown, and Clonkeehan, which five parishes constitute the union of Charlestown or Philipstown, in the patronage of the Lord-Primate; the rectory is impropriate in the Hon. Baron Foster. The tithes of the parish amount to £271. 17. 6., of which £234. 17. 6. is payable to the impropriator, and £37 to the vicar: the amount of tithes for the union, including glebe, payable to the incumbent, is £476. 15. 4. The church, a handsome edifice in the later English style, with a tower and spire, together 108 feet high, was erected in 1827, at an expense, exclusively of the spire, of £1385, a loan from the late Board of First Fruits: the spire was added at an expense of £220, defrayed by the Rev. R. Olpherts, the present incumbent, and several of the resident gentry. The churchyard is enclosed with a handsome iron palisade resting on a low wall of hewn stone, towards the expense of which the lord-primate contributed £50. The glebe-house, a handsome residence within a quarter of a mile from the church, was built by a gift of £250 and a loan of £550 from the late Board of First Fruits: the glebe comprises seven acres of land, valued at £3 per acre, but subject to a rent of £11. 10. 9. per annum, payable to the representatives of the late Alexander Dawson, Esq. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Tallanstown. Adjoining the church is the parochial school-house, containing two large school-rooms, each for 60 boys and girls respectively, with suitable apartments for the master and his family; it was built in 1827, chiefly at the expense of the Rev. R. Olpherts, aided by a grant from Government and some charitable donations: the master, in addition to other contributions, receives £10 per annum from the incumbent. There are some remains of the ancient parish church.

 

 

CLOGHER, or KILCLOGHER, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 6¼ miles (N.E.) from Drogheda; containing 1392 inhabitants. This place, which was anciently called Kilfinnabhoir, was distinguished, in the earliest ages of Christianity in Ireland, by the foundation of a religious establishment, of which St. Nectan, nephew of St. Patrick, was abbot or bishop. It is situated on the eastern coast; and the village, which is about half a mile to the west of Clogher Head, contains about 80 houses and 592 inhabitants, who are chiefly engaged in the fishery, which employs seven smacks from 25 to 40 tons burden each, and 20 row boats. On the north side of Clogher Head is a small cove or dock, partly natural and partly excavated, to which a passage for boats has been cut through the beach, It is much frequented by fishing vessels, on account of its affording shelter from all winds but the north-east; it was much improved by the late Wallop Brabazon, Esq., and might be made one of the best safety harbours in the kingdom. On the south side of the promontory a broad strand extends four miles to the mouth of the Boyne; and to the north of the village, stretching to Dunany Point, is a sandy bay with low reefs, of which one, nearly in the centre, called Cargee, is covered at high water. At Clogher Head is a coast-guard station, one of the six that constitute the Dundalk district. The parish contains, according to the Ordnance survey, 1861¼ statute acres, and is principally under tillage; and there is no waste land. The principal seat is Glaspistole House, the residence of J. Markey, Esq. It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, and is part of the union of Termonfeckan: the tithes amount to £98. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Rathdrummin, and has a neat chapel at Hackett's Cross, with a national school adjoining, There are also a school aided by Capt. Hanfield, and a small hedge school. Near Mr. Markey's seat are the ruins of an ancient castle, consisting principally of a square tower, and at the village of Clogher are the ruins of the old church.

 

 

CLONKEEHAN, a parish, in the barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (N.E.) from Ardee; containing 333 inhabitants. The river Glyde separates this parish from those of Tallanstown and Maplestown, but it is connected with the latter by a bridge on the road from Ardee to Dundalk. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 605 statute acres, two-thirds of which are included within the demesne of Corballis, the seat of T. Lee Norman, Esq. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and is part of the union of Charlestown, or Philipstown : the tithes amount to £46. 3. 1. The church is in ruins. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Tallanstown.

 

 

CLONKEEN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (N.W.) from Ardee, on the road to Monaghan; containing 1981 inhabitants. It comprises 4321½ statute acres, according to the Ordnance survey, valued at £4582 per annum: the soil is fertile, and the land is mostly under cultivation; the system of agriculture is in a highly improved state. There are some quarries of greenstone, which is raised for building and for repairing the roads. The principal seats are Rogerstown, the residence of Miss Young; Cardistown, of J. Caraher, Esq.; Glach, of R. Shegog, Esq.; and Cromartin, belonging to the Clement family. The living is a rectory and vicarage in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate: the tithes amount to £300. The glebe-house is a good residence, built by the present rector, the Rev. W. Lee, and has attached to it 12a. lr. 17p. of glebe. The church is an ancient structure, and contains a neat monument to the Caraher family. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Tallanstown. There are two hedge schools, in which are about 80 boys and 30 girls. Near Lagan bridge are the ruins of an ancient castle.

 

 

CLONMORE, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2½ miles (E. by N.) from Dunleer; containing 769 inhabitants, of which number, 74 are in the hamlet. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1905 statute acres, two-thirds of which are under tillage. The land is of superior quality and highly cultivated, producing excellent crops of wheat and barley; the farms and farm-houses are of a superior description. There is a constabulary police station in the hamlet. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate. The tithes amount to £170. The glebe-house, which is a handsome building, was erected in 1782, on a glebe of 17 acres. The church is a small but handsome edifice, built in 1794, at the sole expense of Primate Robinson. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Dysart, and has a chapel at Wyanstown. There is a parochial school, established and supported by the rector, in which about 20 children are educated. Here are the ruins of a castle, said to have been the residence of the De Verduns, also the walls of an ancient church, where a patron is held annually on the 9th of June, in honour of St. Columbkill, the reputed founder.

 

 

COLLON, a post-town and parish, partly in the barony of LOWER SLANE, county of MEATH, but chiefly in that of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 6 miles (W.N.W.) from Drogheda, on the road to Ardee, and 28 (N. by W.) from Dublin; containing 3217 inhabitants, of which number, 1153 are in the town. This place formerly belonged to the celebrated abbey of Mellifont, and was confirmed to the abbot by Hen. II., at the close of the 12th century. The town has a remarkably neat appearance, and consists of two streets intersecting near the church, and contains 215 houses, of which the greater number are slated. It owes its present prosperity to its proprietors, the Fosters, who established a cotton-manufactory here, which for some time employed more than 600 looms. Linen was previously made here, and its manufacture has been resumed, but the cotton manufacture has entirely ceased. There is a bleach-green, employing more than 50 persons, with a steam-engine of 10-horse power; also a flax-mill, and in the town and its vicinity are three corn­mills, worked by steam and water power. It is a chief constabulary police station. On the 20th of Sept., 1229, Hen. II. granted to the abbot and convent of Mellifont a market on Tuesday in their town of Collon: there is a market-house and an open area at the north end of the town for holding a market, but, except for butchers' meat, none has been held lately. Fairs are held on May 10th, June 29th, Oct. 20th, and Nov. 24th. Petty sessions are held every alternate Thursday.

 

The parish contains about 8600 statute acres, which are mostly under tillage; there is no Waste or bog, but 513 acres of woodland. Here is Oriel Temple, the seat of Viscount Ferrard, whose predecessor was the Rt. Hon. John Foster, the last speaker of the Irish House of Commons, who, in 1821, was created Lord Oriel: it is distinguished by the beauty of its surrounding grounds; and the richness of its extensive plantations. The demesne contains about 1000 acres: in it is a grotto, of which the interior is lined with shells, stained glass, coloured stones, &c., said to be the work of Lady Ferrard; there is also a beautiful rustic cottage. The house contains some good pictures, among which is a full-length portrait of the first Lord Oriel, by Sir Thos. Lawrence. In the vicinity of the town is a nursery of forest trees, consisting of seven acres, which is the property of Lord Ferrard. About a mile from it is Mount Oriel, from which there is an extensive and magnificent view, including the Bay of Carlingford and the grand chain of the Mourne mountains. Belpatrick mountain, which, according to the Ordnance survey, rises 789 feet above the level of the sea, is also within the parish.

 

The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, united by act of council, in 1769, to the rectory and vicarage of Mosstown, and in 1782 the rectory of Dromin was added to the union, which is in the patronage of the Lord Primate and Viscount Ferrard, in the latter of whom the rectory is impropriate, and by whom the land is let tithe-free. About 1769, the late Chief Baron Foster gave a glebe of ten acres, and built the glebe-house, on condition that an augmentation of £50 should be granted from Primate Boulter's fund, and that he should have the patronage of the endowed vicarage two turns out of three. The living was subsequently augmented by the impropriate tithes of Mosstown, which were purchased for the purpose by the Trustees of Primate Boulter's fund, and now produce £248. 14. 11. Besides the glebe at Collon, there is one of three acres at Mosstown, and another at Dromin of nearly 10 acres; and the gross tithes of the benefice amount to £453. 4. 6. The church, an elegant structure of hewn limestone, in the ancient style of English archi­tecture, was built in 1813, during the incumbency of Dr. Beaufort, author of the "Ecclesiastical Map and Memoir of Ireland" the cost was about £8000, of which £3800 was a gift and £700 a loan from the late Board of First Fruits; the members of the Foster family contributed bountifully towards its erection; the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have lately granted £368. 6. 9. for its repair. The interior is 90 feet by 40, the ceiling beautifully groined, and it has five windows on the south side, besides a large east window over the altar. All the side windows are of stained glass, the gift of the present Baron Foster; the east window is in course of preparation, being the gift of the impropriator. Under the church is the burial-place of that family, and in it is a marble monument to the memory of Catherine Letitia Foster, widow of William, Lord Bishop of Clogher, which was erected by her daughter, the Countess de Salis. The ecclesiastical duties of Collon were formerly performed by a monk from Mellifont abbey. The R.C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; the chapel is a neat structure. There is also a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. A male and female school, under the trustees of Erasmus Smith's charity, is aided by a donation from Lord Ferrard; and there are two others aided by the vicar. Besides these, there are an infants' school, supported by Mrs. Green, and two private schools. At Belpatrick is a school principally supported by Edward and James Singleton, Esqrs. There is also a dispensary in the town.

 

 

CREGGAN, a parish, partly in the barony of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, but chiefly in the barony of UPPER FEWS, county of ARMAGH, and province of ULSTER, 8 miles (W.N.W.) from Dundalk, on the road to Newtown-Hamilton; containing 14,261 inhabitants, of which number, 1674 are in that part of the parish which is in the county of Louth. This parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 24,815¼ statute acres, of which 21,823½, including 419½ of water, are in Armagh, and 2991¾ in Louth. Of these, 21,640 acres are applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £19,708 per ann.; and 1088 are mountain, bog, and lakes. The surface is irregularly broken and the general aspect bold: the soil is generally good, and the system of cultivation improving. Linen cloth and yarn are manufactured to a small extent by the farmers, whose principal dependence has been the breeding of cattle, but now most of the grazing land has been converted into arable, and even much of the mountainous district has been brought into cultivation. The river Creggan, which divides this parish into two nearly equal parts, turns several mills and contains fine trout. Near the village are several hundred acres of bog or moorland used for fuel; and here is a coarse kind of granite and also a coarse slate, which is very hard and durable: the quarries, however, are not much worked, except by the neighbouring farmers, who use the stone for building. The village is pleasantly situated, and the surrounding scenery is picturesque. A market is held on Friday at Crossmaglen, for provisions, and fairs on the first Friday in every month for farming stock. Cullyhanna, also a village in this parish, is an im­proving place. Fairs are held in it on the second Tuesday in January, April, July, and October; and there are two at Ball's-Mills. There is a penny post to Dundalk; and petty sessions for the Crossmaglen district are held in the school-room at Creggan, on alternate Saturdays, or weekly if requisite. The principal seats in the parish are Urker Lodge, the property of T.P. Ball, Esq., to whom the parish principally belongs; Crossmaglen, of Capt. Ball; and Clohog Lodge, of R.G. Wallace, Esq.

 

The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Armagh, and forms the corps of the treasurership in the cathedral of St. Patrick, Armagh, in the patronage of the Lord-Primate. The tithes amount to £1050: the glebe-house, which is near the church, is romantically situated on the river Creggan, which flows through a deep glen abounding with picturesque scenery, and ornamented with evergreens, rustic seats, and walks cut out of the solid rock: the surrounding grounds have been greatly improved by the Rev. Dr. Atkinson, the rector. The glebe, comprising 300 Irish acres, consists of the whole townland of Cregganban except 40 acres appropriated as a glebe for Newtown-Hamilton, when that parish was severed from Creggan. The church is a spacious and handsome edifice in the centre of the parish, built in 1758, and to which a lofty square tower was added in 1799. In the R.C. divisions the parish is the head of two unions or districts, called Upper and Lower Creggan; the former contains four chapels, situated at Crossmaglen, Glasdrummond, Mowbane, and Shela, of which that at Crossmaglen was built in 1834, on a site given by T.P. Ball, Esq., at an expense of £750; and the one at Glasdrummond is a large and handsome building. The part called Lower Creggan is united with the parish of Newtown-Hamilton, and contains a chapel at Cullyhanna and one in Newtown-Hamilton, both in that parish. At Freeduff is a meeting-house for Presbyterians in connection with the Synod of Ulster of the second class; and there is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists at Ball's-Mills. The parochial schools, in which are about 50 boys and 40 girls, are supported by the rector, who gives the house, which was built in 1822, and a garden and two acres of land rent-free for the master, besides books for the children. There is a female working school in the church-yard, and an infants' school superintended by Mrs. Atkinson; also schools at Tullynavale and Anavachavarkey, built by the rector, aided by some subscriptions, and chiefly supported by him; in the former, which is a large and handsome edifice, divine service is performed by the rector, or his curate, on Sunday evenings. At Darsey is a national school; and there are thirteen private schools in the parish, in which about 460 children are educated. A dispensary was established at Crossmaglen in 1830. In the northern part of the parish are vestiges of an ancient intrenchment, which extended more than a mile in length and about one third of a mile in breadth; it is now intersected by roads.

 

 

DARVER, a parish, in the barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 3½ miles (N.W.) from Castle-Bellingham; containing 631 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1992 statute acres of good arable and pasture land, of which 1935 are applotted under the tithe act. Darver Castle is the seat of J. Booth, Esq. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, separated on the death of the last incumbent from the parish of Dromiskin, pursuant to the recommendation of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1831, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate. The tithes amount to £230: the glebe comprises 1¾ acres valued at £8 per annum. The ruins of the church are near Darver Castle: there is no glebe-house. In the R.C. divisions it is the head of a union or district, comprising Darver and Dromiskin, in each of which is a chapel. There is a school under the National Board, in which are about 190 boys and 150 girls.

 

 

DROMIN, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1½ mile (N.W.) from Dunleer, near the road from Drogheda to Dundalk; containing 855 inhabitants, of which number, 141 are in the village. According to the Ordnance survey, it comprises 2042¼ statute acres. Rathcoole House, the seat of E. Tisdall, Esq., is situated in a neat demesne. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and forms part of the union of Collon: the tithes amount to £204. 9. 7., and the glebe comprises 9¾ acres. In the R.C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Dunleer: the chapel adjoins the village. About 180 children are taught in a school under the patronage of the Rev. W.H. Forster, the incumbent, who pays the master £10 per ann. Contiguous to the village are the remains of the old church, and a churchyard; and near the chapel is a large rath.

 

 

DROMISKIN, a parish, in the barony and county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, on the road from Drogheda to Dundalk; containing, with the post-town of Lurgan-green, 2621 inhabitants, of which number, 377 are in the village. According to the Ordnance survey it comprises 5312 statute acres, mostly of good quality and under an improved system of tillage; there is neither waste land nor bog. The principal seats are Dromisken House, the residence of the Brabazon family; the glebe-house, of the Rev. J. Smythe; and Miltown Grange, of Mrs. Fortescue. The living is a rectory and vicarage, recently separated from Darver, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord­Primate: the tithes amount to £573. 17. 7. The glebe-house was built in 1766, at an expense of £993. 10. The glebe comprises 21 acres, valued at £63 per annum. The church is a handsome structure, with a tower, rebuilt in 1823 by aid of a loan of £800 from the late Board of First Fruits. In the R.C. divisions the parish is part of the union or district of Darver; the chapel is a neat building, erected in 1823, at a cost of £800. About 400 children are educated in the parochial and another school; the former is aided by the incumbent. The castle of Miltown is a quadrangular building, defended at the angles by round towers, 45 feet high, surmounted by tall graduated battlements. Near the summit of a rising ground, two or three furlongs distant, is an arched subterraneous vault, extending for a considerable length, and supposed to have been a secret entrance to the castle. About 30 yards from the church is the lower part of an ancient round tower, which is surmounted by a modern pointed roof and used for a belfry.

 

 

DRUMCAR, a parish, in the barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1½ mile (N. by E.) from Dunleer, on the river Glyde, and near the high road from Dublin to Belfast; containing 1634 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 4041½ statute acres, of which, 3712 are applotted under the tithe act, and 18½ are in the river Glyde. The soil is fertile and the lands, are mostly under tillage; the system of agriculture is in a highly improved state; there is neither waste land nor bog. Two streams, abounding with salmon and trout, unite at a bridge, and form what is thence called the river of Drumcar. Drumcar, the seat of J. McClintock, Esq., is an elegant mansion, beautifully situated in an extensive and richly wooded demesne, commanding a fine view of the Carlingford and Mourne mountains and the sea; and at Annagasson is the residence of R. Thompson, Esq., pleasantly situated on the sea shore. Petty sessions are held every fortnight, near the seat of Drumcar. The parish is in the diocese of Armagh; the rectory is impropriate in the Lord-Primate, having been purchased by Primate Marsh, for the endowment of such clergyman as his lordship may appoint to it, and subject to the payment of £50 per annum to the perpetual curate of Moylary under certain provisions of the testator's will. The vicarage forms part of the union of Dunleer. The tithes amount to £343, of which £292 is payable to the lord-primate and £51 to the vicar; the glebe comprises 11 acres. The ruins of the parish church form an interesting relic on the demesne of Mr. McClintock; the Protestant parishioners attend the church at Dunleer, and divine service is performed every Sunday evening by the curate in the school-room at Drumcar; the old churchyard is still used as a burial-ground. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Dysart: there is no regular chapel, but a house bas been given to the priest, in which he officiates. A school is supported by Mr. and Lady McClintock, who pay a master for teaching more than 100 children, and other expenses, amounting to £50 per annum. A school is also supported by Mr. Thompson, in which 40 children are instructed. A religious house appears to have existed here at a very early period.

 

 

DRUMGOOLSTOWN, a village, in the parish of Stabannon, Barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 4 miles (E.) from Ardee, on the road to Castle-Bellingham; containing 117 inhabitants. It consists of 20 houses and is a constabulary police station.

 

 

DRUMSHALLON, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 4 miles (N.) from Drogheda, on the coast road to Dundalk; containing 1048 inhabitants. This parish was distinguished as the site of a monastery founded at Druimineas­cluinn, now Drumshallon, by St. Patrick, for Canons Regular, of which the abbot Tiarnach, who died in 876, and some of his successors were generally styleed Bishops: in 969, being in the possession of the Danes, it was plundered by Muirceartagh, Prince of Oileach, and son of Donell, King of Ireland, on which occasion many of the Danish occupants were killed. The priory of the Holy Trinity, now Christ-Church, Dublin, had a cell of three canons at this place; but Albert, Archbishop of Armagh, desirous of reforming the state of religion, suppressed it, as preserving no regular order or discipline. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 3585½ statute acres, including 372 acres in the detached townland of Labanstown on the sea coast, and 9¾ acres in Lough Kircock. Drumshallon is the residence of Gorges Henzill, Esq. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, partly appropriate to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Dublin, and partly forming part of the corps of the precentorship in that cathedral, annexed to which are lands here comprising 494a. 1r. 29p. statute measure, let on lease to Mr. Henzill, at a rent of £46.3. 1., with an annual renewal fine of £77. 10. 9¼: the tithes amount to £178. 17. 4½, wholly payable to the precentor. The Protestant parishioners attend divine service in the church of Ballymakenny, the incumbent of which is paid £10. 10. per annum by the appropriators, for performing the occasional duties of this parish. In the R.C. divisions the parish is partly in the union or district of Termonfechin, and partly in that of Moylary; the chapel is at Fieldstown. The parochial school is under the patronage of the Countess de Salis, and aided with £12. 12. per annum, from the appropriators; and there is a private school, in which are about 40 boys and 20 girls.

 

 

DUNANY, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 5 miles (E.N.E.) from Dunleer; containing 571 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the eastern coast, contains, according to the Ordnance survey, 1661¾ statute acres, chiefly under tillage. Dunany House, the residence of Lady Bellingham, is surrounded by an extensive and finely-planted demesne, and commands fine views of the sea and the Carlingford mountains. Dunany Point is distinguished at sea by the church, which stands on the summit of the rising ground: at the Point is a chief station of the coast-guard. The parish is in the diocese of Armagh; the vicarage was united in the 18th century to those of Parsonstown, Marlinstown, and Salterstown, and is in the patronage of the Marquess of Drogheda; the rectory is impropriate in Lady Bellingham. The tithes amount to £154. 0. 8. of which £90. 16. 8½ is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar; and the tithes of the entire benefice amount to £111. 18. 10½. The church, which is in excellent repair, was built in 1814, and the glebe about the same period, by aid of a gift of £400 and a load of £364 from the late Board of First Fruits; the glebe comprises 20 acres, valued at £27 per annum. In the R.C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Dysart. About 20 children are educated in a private school.

 

 

DUNLEER, a post-town and parish (formerly a parliamentary borough), in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 10 miles (S.E.) from Dundalk, and 30 (N.) from Dublin, on the great north road to Belfast; containing 1603 inhabitants, of which number, 710 are in the town. This place appears to have been first brought into notice by its proprietor, Geo. Legge, Esq., ancestor of the Dartmouth family, to whom Chas. II, in 1671, granted a market and fairs; and on whose petition, for the greater encouragement of settlers, the same monarch, in 1678, incorporated the inhabitants by charter, vesting the government in a sovereign, 12 burgesses, and an indefinite number of freemen. The sovereign, who with his deputy was a justice of the peace and coroner for the borough, was annually elected, subject to the approval of the lord of the manor, from the burgesses, who also filled up vacancies in their own body, and by a majority of whom the freemen were admitted by favour, and a recorder and town-clerk and all other corporate officers were appointed. The corporation returned two members to the Irish parliament till the Union, when the borough was disfranchised, and the £15,000 awarded as compensation was paid in equal moieties to the Right Hon. John Foster, speaker of the Irish House of Commons, and to Henry Coddington, Esq. From the Union till the year 1811 a sovereign was regularly elected, but since that period no election has taken place, and the corporation is now virtually extinct. The town contains 130 houses indifferently built, and is the property of Rodolph de Salis, Esq. The market has been long discontinued, but fairs are held under the charter on July 5th, Dec. 11th, May 14th, and Sept. 19th, and other fairs toll-free on Jan. 6th, Feb. 1st, March 9th, April 1st, June 9th, Aug. 11th, and Nov. 1st. A chief constabulary police force is stationed in the town. The parish, according to the Ordnance survey, comprises 2378¾ statute acres. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, united by act of council, in 1682, to the rectories of Dysart, Cappog, Monasterboyce, and Moylary, and to the vicarage of Drumcar, and in the patronage of the Crown. The tithes amount to £153. 12. 3., and of the whole benefice to £741. 11. 7. The glebe-house was built by a gift of £100 and a loan of £1125 from the late Board of First Fruits; the glebe comprises 20¼ acres, of which 19¼ are subject to a rent of £3 per acre. The church has been recently enlarged and repaired, at an expense of £300 granted by the same Board. In the R.C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, comprising also the parishes of Cappog, Mosstown, Dromin, and Richardstown, and part of the parish of Kildemock; the chapel is a neat edifice, and there are chapels also at Dromin and Mosstown. About 50 children are taught in the parochial school, which is supported by the rector and curate; an infants' school is supported by subscription; and a handsome schoolhouse has been built in connection with the New Board of Education. There is also a private school, in which are about 80 children; and a dispensary. The horn of a large moose deer was found some years since near the town.

 

 

DYSART, a parish, in the barony of FERRARD, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Dunleer, on the coast road from Drogheda to Dundalk; containing 699 inhabitants. The land is of superior quality and well cultivated: about two-thirds are in tillage, and there are about 50 acres of bog. The village of Grange Bellew, consisting of about 25 houses, occupied by the labourers of Sir Patrick Bellew, Bart., has a neat appearance. There is a mill for grinding oatmeal, and another for dressing flax. Barmeath, the residence of Sir Patrick Bellew, stands in a richly wooded demesne, commanding extensive views. The old castle of John Bellew (one of the lords of the English pale) is incorporated in the present mansion; and in the demesne is Windmill Hill, on which is a circular tower forming a conspicuous landmark. The parish is in the diocese of Armagh, and is a rectory, forming part of the union of Dunleer: the tithes amount to £129. 19. 7½. In the R.C. divisions it is the head of a union or district, which also comprises the parishes of Clonmore, Port, Dunany, Salterstown, and Drumcar; and contains three chapels. That of Dysart is a handsome building, the site for which was presented by Sir Patrick Bellew, who also contributed towards its erection. A school of about 160 children is aided by Sir Patrick, who also contributed largely towards the erection of the schoolhouse. Some vestiges of the ancient church still remain in the burial­ ground.

 

 

FAUGHART, or FAUGHER, a parish, in the ba­rony of UPPER DUNDALK, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 1½ mile (N.N.E.) from Dundalk, on the road, through Forkhill, to Armagh; containing 1640 inhabitants. This place, which is also called Foghard, probably takes its name from a very ancient fort of singular construction, which occupies an elevated situation in the neighbourhood. In 638 St. Monenna founded a nunnery here for 150 sisters, over whom she presided for some years, but subsequently resigned her charge to Orbila and Servila, and erected a convent for herself at Kilslieve, in the county of Armagh. A monastery for Canons Regular was also founded at an early period and dedicated to St. Bridget; but there are no remains of either of the buildings, and the only vestiges are two small pillars or crosses, called respectively the stone and pillar of St. Bridget, one having the figure of a horse-shoe sculptured in high relief, and the other a square pillar raised on two circular steps. The ancient fort of Faughart consists of an artificial mount 60 feet high, surrounded by a deep trench with a counterscarp; the whole area of the summit is circumscribed by the foundations of an octagonal building, but whether a tower or only a parapet is uncertain. It is situated near the ancient frontier of the English pale, and in 1596, the Archbishop of Cashel and the Earl of Ormonde, on the part of the English government, held a conference here with the Irish chieftains O'Nial and McDonnel, to negotiate a treaty of peace, which was rejected by the latter. During the insurrection of the Earl of Tyrone, Lord Mount joy frequently encamped at this place and in the neighbourhood, and in 1600 remained here from the 15th of October till the 9th of November, while the Earl held the pass of Moira, about a mile distant. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 2480½ statute acres, three ­fourths of which are arable and the remainder pasture; there is neither waste land nor bog; the soil is fertile and the system of agriculture improved. Limestone of good quality abounds, and there are several limekilns. The principal gentlemen's seats are Faughart House, the residence of Neale McNeale, Esq., pleasantly situated in a well-planted demesne; Fort Hill, of the Rev. G. Tinley, beautifully situated on an eminence commanding a fine view of the town and bay of Dundalk, and having in the demesne a Danish fort, from which it takes its name; and Mount Bayly, the residence of D. Courtenay, Esq. A constabulary police force has been established here. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Armagh, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate: the tithes amount to £250: there is neither glebe-house nor glebe. The church, a very neat modern edifice, was erected by aid of a gift of £800 and a loan of £800 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1815; it is situated on the townland of Kilcurry, which is a detached portion of the parish of Ballymascanlon. In the R.C. divisions this is the head of the union or district of Faughart and Jonesborough, comprising those parishes and part of Ballymascanlon, and containing two chapels, one in this parish and one in Jonesborough; the former is on the townland of Kilcurry. About 80 children are taught in the parochial school which is aided by the rector; and a school is held in the R.C. chapel. There are some remains of the ancient church of Urney, and also of the old castle of Dungooley, on the townland of that name; the latter is said to have been one of the seats of the Earl of Tyrone. St. Bridget is said to have been born in this parish.


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